Comments

2

ziq wrote (edited )

I've pretty much already deserted. I don't think there's any way to stop what's coming at this point, even if most people gave a shit, which they don't. But I can't just stop being affected by fucked up shit that happens, even tho I know full well I have no control over it. I still have the need to spread awareness about what's coming and why it's happening and who is doing it. I still want others to know everything that has been taken from us. I want them to know who did this and what we've lost. Even if it's all under the sea in a century, I want the skeletons to know.

the rich are preparing for a world after collapse. at some point climate change will spook them so bad that they'll start killing the poor off in a desperate attempt to slow down the collapses. millions of climate refugees trying to get north will be slaughtered en-route. these are things we have to prepare for.

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ziq wrote (edited )

The rich can survive underground as long as they have LEDs to grow food and can tap into deep aquifers for water. In remote countries undiminished by industry (especially fracking, which renders the water toxic). The bunkers they're building now in new zealand are pretty primitive in comparison to the underground cities they'll have to build to stay alive for multiple generations tho.

Humidity may prove breaking point for some areas as temperatures rise, says study:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171222090302.htm

What Are the Limits of Human Survival:

https://www.livescience.com/34128-limits-human-survival.html

Most humans will suffer hyperthermia after 10 minutes in extremely humid, 140-degree-Fahrenheit (60-degrees-Celsius) heat. Death by cold is harder to delimit. A person usually expires when their body temperature drops to 70 degrees F (21 degrees C), but how long this takes to happen depends on how "used to the cold" a person is, and whether a mysterious, latent form of hibernation sets in, which has been known to happen.

The boundaries of survival are better established for long-term comfort. According to a 1958 NASA report, people can live indefinitely in environments that range between roughly 40 degrees F and 95 degrees F (4 and 35 degrees C), if the latter temperature occurs at no more than 50 percent relative humidity. The maximum temperature pushes upward when it's less humid, because lower water content in the air makes it easier to sweat, and thus, keep cool.

The Deadly Combination of Heat and Humidity:

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/opinion/sunday/the-deadly-combination-of-heat-and-humidity.html

If CO2 Levels Continue to Rise "Humid Heatwaves" Will Start to Kill Healthy People within Hours in the next Decades as Climate Scientists Say the Wet Bulb Temperature Survivability Threshold may be Beached Sooner than Projected:

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/8/e1603322.full

Asia Soon To Be Too Hot & Humid To Live In = 800 million new refugees:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/17/climate/india-heat-wave-summer.html

https://insideclimatenews.org/news/02082017/heatwaves-deadly-heat-humidity-wet-bulb-human-survivability-threshold

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/8/e1603322.full

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ziq wrote (edited )

This is only true to an extent. Eventually, the damage to the climate will destroy all above ground human habitats. Humans and other mammals simply can't survive the temperature / humidity combo we're going to reach; eventually even in the arctic (which is already on fire every summer).

Even before then, the mass immigration to the pockets of the Earth that will still be habitable will stretch those ecosystems beyond their ability to sustain their populations. Which will lead to further warming, and mass starvation.

The latest science points to a warming chain reaction already set off that we won't be able to stop even if we ended all industrial activity. Right now we're only feeling the effects of industrial activity from 40 years ago - back when industry wasn't nearly as large scale as today.

The planet will do what it's always done and save itself by wiping out the lifeform that did the damage (us).

There have been periods on Earth where the temperatures / carbon in the atmosphere were higher than they are now, and the life that lived here then was much different - mainly reptilian. The planet will go on, but life as we know it won't.

Historically collapse can indeed be worldwide, which every ice age we've had proves. But in the short term, the collapses will happen in hot climates first, while the cold climates will become the new hot climates, and then eventually they'll become so hot that they'll collapse too.

The science that's been coming out in the last few years is far worse than anything we could have expected just 10 years ago

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ziq wrote (edited )

Cognitive dissonance. They've lived their whole lives with the conveniences and comforts of consumer society and even though they know it's completely destructive and short-sighted to live in this unsustainable manner, they can't allow themselves to imagine a world without those privileges.

Addiction. Even if the population of the global south has been enslaved and terrorized to produce it. Even if the whole planet is on fire and entire countries are about to sink underwater. They have to have their screens, their jets, their air conditioners because to them, that's what life is now. Escape. Distraction. Instant dopamine releases to numb the crushing reality of life under industrialism.

https://www.helpguide.org/harvard/how-addiction-hijacks-the-brain.htm