Comments

1

yaaqov wrote (edited )

Today I had:

  • Water
  • Goat milk kefir
  • Beads of water that collect on oxalis leaves in the rain
  • Water that was way too cold
4

yaaqov wrote

I have to make some art for my mom for her birthday. She's been asking for art for a long time but I just haven't been able to get myself to sit down and draw for years. But I promised her I would.

I have no idea what to actually make. I don't want to just give her a pencil sketch, but I don't even own other media right now..

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yaaqov wrote

I'm not really sure, though, to my ear, it feels similar to compounding/single-word form.

In some sense, it's not really about spelling at all, but about the fact that "transwoman", as a compound noun, means something slightly different than "trans woman", which is a noun with an adjective. The spelling just represents the pronunciation which is itself just an externalization of the syntactic/grammatical structure; different syntactic configurations give rise to different meanings.

So I default to "trans woman" because that spelling is the most likely to be pronounced as an adjective modifying a noun, which avoids the potentially negative implications that a noun compound like "transwoman" (and to me, "trans-woman") has. But if someone is using something else for themselves, that's what I use for them, too.

9

yaaqov wrote

The latter, with the space, is the “right one”. The idea being that when trans is just an adjective, it describes just another type of man/woman, but by making it a noun compound without a space (and notice that there is a slight difference in pronunciation, like between “blackbird” and “black bird”), it can seem to indicate that trans people’s genders are something distinct from that of cis people’s, and can feel dehumanizing.

More important than any particular line of reasoning though, is of course that many people have simply expressed that that’s what they prefer, and that the compounded form makes them uncomfortable. Done.

And so it does seem reasonable to default to using the space, then. Nonetheless, I don’t know if I’m comfortable calling the compounded form a misuse, because there are trans people who use it for themselves, and they’re not “wrong” to do so. Author Margaret Killjoy comes to mind, for instance.

4

yaaqov wrote

I had a lucid dream so lucid that I was talking with the people in my dream about whether or not they too knew it was a dream. A couple of them told me that yeah, they had known it was a dream. Another person told me that they hadn't, and they were feeling embarrassed for not realizing. I reassured them that in most of my dreams I never realize.

But at the same time I sort of wasn't lucid at all. It was more like I was dreaming that I had a lucid dream... dreaming that I realized my dream was a dream, instead of actually realizing it. Lately my lucid dreams have been of that nature. They lack any of the exploratory control of lucid dreams from when I was younger. No flying, no fucking, no speaking in languages that don't exist yet. That moment of "Oh shit, I can try doing stuff" never hits. I just... know I'm dreaming. And the dream continues.

2

yaaqov wrote (edited )

Could you elaborate a little more on this idea for a font?

Okay, I'm happy to hear it!

Well I've been teaching myself to use fontforge in the last few weeks, but what I'll be sending to you was created solely on fonstruct, which is very limited in that you can only draw from a finite set of shapes and set them on a grid, with no bezier curves or anything, but that's just fine for a script made of squares haha.

(I also made a "helping font" just like Dotsies uses—that is, a replacement of the blocks in the columns with the letters (in my case, IPA) that they represent—and that could really use a re-do in something with real drawing capabilities. It's... rough. You'll see.)

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yaaqov wrote (edited )

Totally! I think this is especially an issue when the columns are viewed in isolation, and without a clear baseline, as is the case here. However, I think this issue is generally mitigated in the context of a real sentence: the whole vertical range is typically used, so that being able to interpret the vertical position of the material within a given column becomes much easier.

In terms of redundancy, it's true, there is essentially no room for variation within a column without a different, unintended letter/sound being represented. However, again, I think that the context of writing helps a lot: here, the fact that the columns within a word directly abut each other means that strings that correspond to words nearly appear as gestalt glyphs, almost like logographs/pictographs. Here is an example using the Dotsies system from the website; while moving one dot in an isolated letter may be scarcely detectable, in the context of word, a pretty noticeably different shape is created: Here's a side-by-side comparison of a couple words and their variations.


As for progress on my own system, well all I really have right now is a .ttf font! Which I'd be happy to share, and can do so by later today, along with some explanation about how to use it and the system itself.

3

yaaqov wrote

Oh shit! I’d love to hear people’s thoughts about this, if they have any; I’m in the process of designing something similar, which I hope to release in some capacity soon.

(The primary difference between this system and mine is that while this system maintains a one-to-one correspondence to letters in English, which makes learning easier for people who already are literate in English but preserves all of the numerous issues with English spelling, mine attempts to weave a spelling reform together with using a similar 32 bit system of “dots”.

In other words, this system has each column of dots represent one of the 26 letters. The one I’m working on has each column represent one* sound/phoneme of English)

*well, English is generally analysed as having 40ish phonemes but I’ve managed to boil it down to 31, while avoiding virtually all ambiguity/heteronymy (same spelling, different sound and meaning, like “tear paper” and “tear in my eye”)

Reply to comment by /u/Pop in Should we eat only fruits? by /u/sudo

2

yaaqov wrote (edited )

I tried to pursue something like this goal, but I could not arrive at any solution besides like, not eating anything.

I mean, there’s a huge amount of evidence that tons of plants use a variety of defense mechanisms to prevent their ingestion. It’s incredible actually. They release toxins. They move, if slowly (but not always). They call for help from wasps using chemical signals. Lettuce sends news of its damage to its neighbors. Countless food plants poke and prickle you. The very taste that we love about garlic is its chemical response to damage. Isn’t that fucked up? We’re like that evil clown from It, who scares kids before eating them because it likes the taste of adrenaline.

And I don’t know about “pain”, or “sentience”, but christ. I can’t chop vegetables anymore without cringing a little. Even eating fruit, I can’t shake the feeling that it’s akin to r*pe, in some sense; just because something has genitals doesn’t mean they are ours to use.

3

yaaqov wrote

In addition to the problems others have mentioned with petitions, the content of this declaration of rights itself (and the fact that it's, well, a declaration of rights) is liberal as fuck; I see little about it that couldn't be utilized to justify the status quo (which, believe it or not, was unconscionable even before trump) or any other similarly oppressive situation.

We... can no longer abide by the rule of law that has become corrupt and tyrannical.

Try ending this sentence after the word "law".

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yaaqov wrote

Because that is the essence of racism.

It's really not, though. Racism is structural/societal/institutional (and crucially, asymmetrical) system of oppression. While people of all races can be racist, it's not possible to be racist towards people of all races; namely, it's not possible to racist towards white people, though it's certainly possible to be prejudiced or mean towards white people, since they will never be made to institutionally suffer as a result of their whiteness.