Comments

5

yaaqov wrote

Oh shit, I see :(

I know a part of me used to think something like "nobody's really a man or a woman!", and even if it's true (and I don't think it is), putting that thought out there, or otherwise questioning people's binarity itself, will only hurt trans people more than it could ever make cis people question themselves, or whatever it was supposed to do.

An ongoing problem for me and other non-binary people I know though, is how to challenge gender essentialism (not bio essentialism), making space for narratives that are not of the form "I have always been x", in a way that somehow doesn't hurt binary trans people, many of whom identify with or at least are made to appeal to that narrative in a way that can help legitimize their identities. I still haven't figured that one out.

1

yaaqov wrote

This might depend on what’s in the pancakes but a vegan topping I love with potatoes is a Salsa criolla/ zarza peruana; most basically, it’s thinly chopped red onions and lime juice. I like a version with lots of black pepper. You could use fresh chili peppers, or bell peppers, or pickled beets, too. Cilantro or flat leaf parsley would be nice. You could add some salt. If you don’t have lime, lemon juice or even red wine vinegar could work. Rinsing the slices of raw onion in cold water for a couple minutes will reduce their sharpness.

Reply to comment by /u/EatTheRich in Friday Free Talk by /u/selver

5

yaaqov wrote

Damn. That’s tough.

I’ve been experiencing something like the inverse, where my parents have been fairly happy to use they/them for my partner, but don’t seem to be trying at all to use they/them for me. They’re not hostile about it but it’s just like, unthinkable to them, that I could be anything but their son, even as they have come to understand the non-binarity of others.

3

yaaqov wrote (edited )

This is a little over my head as i'm not sure what you are talking about.

Sorry, I think I was trying to say how like, it seems like the conception of ugliness being constructed in my mom's anecdote is one that is in some ways analogous to colorism as it arises in some POC communities, like in that it's specifically racialized, not "simply about attractiveness" or something—a spectrum is created with an ideal white body on one end and a (anti)ideal jewish body on the other. So under this ideology, proximity to/assimilability into phenotypical whiteness (or is it really gentile-like-ness? but what does that mean with respect to whiteness? see idk. but it's racialized) is a desirible trait to which jews may strive or be categorized, as more or less worthy, more or less sexy, more or less capable, etc.

I hope that makes a little more sense, but i totally get if it didn't, because that was more of a stream-of-consciousness than the clarification I intended it to be :(

Are we really ugly? or is the world just racist?

I don't know quite how to approach this.

On one hand, I feel like something like ugliness is inseparable from politics of race, class, ability, so that it is impossible to know if anyone can be ugly, like, prior to those structures.

While it may be the case that every language ever spoken has had a word for ugly, can beauty as a concept ever stand apart from whiteness after global white supremacy and colonialism? Maybe under the dominant view of beauty, it's not the case that people like jews just happen to be ugly, or even that we are inherently ugly, but that we are definitionally ugly. But this is not the only beauty that can exist. Even if beauty can never be prior to whiteness again, I do think it can be subversive of it, and extend beyond it.

3

yaaqov wrote

I also have insecurity about my nose—well, a weird combination of semi-contrived pride and insecurity, depending on the context and the day. In general, my Jewish-indexed features hold this position—my hair, my lips, my (would-be) unibrow.

A recent discussion with mom shed some light on how community-internal colorism and other racialized phenotype-based/lookist hierarchies can manifest among Ashkenazim. She recounted stories of being called being called ugly as a child, by a kid her age, and recalled thinking something along the lines of "how dare they talk, they look even more Jewish than I do".

Whiteness operates in confusing ways sometimes.

5

yaaqov wrote

This is the point I was intending to make. u/RosaReborn more or less expanded on where I was going.

Obviously, the BPP were not apologists for police brutality. But the insinuation of the original post was that all ML(M)s are necessarily, by virtue of their theoretical positioning, complicit in these structural oppressions listed there. My point is that this is absurd and false.

6

yaaqov wrote

I don't know, but I do. I figure that the outcomes of elections have the potential to affect the material conditions under which we live, sometimes in small ways, sometimes in large ways. And I don't believe that this is particularly less predictable than any other social/political happening. So I do try to vote.

8

yaaqov wrote

I had oral surgery last week and can only eat soup, so I tore the frets off my guitar and am taping little cut lengths of wire back on the fretboard, but in different places.

What’s weird is how my brain still wants to interpret these intervals as half-steps, even though there are now 16 per octave.

I wish I were more motivated to cook.

4

yaaqov wrote

Isn't he specifically talking about how the 13th allows for slavery of prisoners? i.e. isn't he calling for prison abolition? It seems that way from his first tweet "... all who are free from prisons as we abolish the 13th amendment", and a follow up clarifies it further: "the 13th Amendment is slavery in disguise meaning it never ended...".

8

yaaqov wrote

I got to serendipitously spend a few days with my partner, after their plans for a work trip fell through. We’d been seeing eachother only a few hours every week or so, so it was very nice and imporant and motivating.