yaaqov

yaaqov wrote

I come from a secular Jewish background, and I personally grew up intensely atheist and anti-spiritual, committed to hard determinism and scientism. I was obsessed with the idea of disproving any possibility of free will. Everything was, to me, ultimately reducible to physics.

I’d say now, that I’ve not so much completely abandoned this commitment to “everything being physics”, as really widened what I think “physics” can be, and decentered it in terms of where it matters it all:

  • I’m much more interested in constructionism and anti-essentialism than atheism.
  • I’m a subscriber to what I call “weak panpsychism”, holding that both life and consciousness itself can emerge in any system capable of the right mix of chaotic and orderly behavior, including, perhaps: cellular automata; the arrangement and interaction of crystal defects inside the earth’s mantle; the patterns of road-vehicle traffic and congestion across a continent; the entire internet itself; my body as a whole, of which my brain and “self” are only a small subpart; all the black holes present in our galactic supercluster.
  • I’ve allowed myself to care about chaos magick and tulpamancy and ego death and golems (glamim?) and lucid dreaming and tiny ephemeral gods.
  • A “nihilism” that looks like every meaning flourishing and interacting and contradicting at once, in which all things are emergent, all “atoms” are quasiparticles.
  • And so on. It changes every day.
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yaaqov wrote

Well, so it was really just experimental since they live in my compost and everywhere else—I boiled one and ate it straight. In the future, I’d like to try to cook with some. It was honestly pretty good—they taste a bit like shrimp, though in combination with the shell, it was sort of like after you’ve eaten raw spinach, in terms of that oxylic acid astringent mouthfeel? This was an adult, with a pretty thick, calcified shell, so that was part of it. Overall, totally pleasant.

I know historically, they’ve been infused into various things, like butter and even wine.

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yaaqov wrote (edited )

Reply to comment by catachresis in Hi by catachresis

I've also been wanting to learn Toki Pona!

To be honest, this conlang is a big, ever-changing kitchen sink of ideas... I've always wanted to make something that was first and foremost personal, playful, mathematical, and without the fiction (that is, world building) of many conlanging projects, while still having the complexity, ambiguity, and irregularity of natural languages and naturalistic conlangs.

Most of my most developed conlanging projects are actually things I've done with other people, so this one I'm really developing for journaling and other such solitary activities–a fact that is actually designed right into its morphology and syntax!

Basically though, it's just a confluence of features that I have thought are cool over the last few years, from phonology (it's developing a pitch accent system, but based on creaky and breathy phonation!) to morphosyntax (it has split ergativity depending on person!) to orthography/writing system (the shape of each glyph provides information on what sound it represents by locating the "position" of that sound as a vertex on a five dimensional cube!).

But yeah..

Anyway, I think it's a great time to learn a new language, conlang or not! Or.... my personal suggestion.... to try and make up your own! If it's something you think you'd be interested in learning more about, I could definitely direct you to more resources.


Wow, do you recall what kind of bean that was with?

Okay, so here are just a few Chinese examples!

dou sha is sweet red bean paste, used as a base for looots of stuff. hong dou is red bean/adzuki bean.

hong dou tang is a hot sweet adzuki soup, especially Cantonese

lü dou tang is a chilled sweet mung bean soup, sometimes with sticky rice and lotus seed and such (lü dou is mung bean)

•there are lots of pastries and stuff made with both beans, like lü dou gao, a super crumbly mung bean cake

•there are also like, popsicles made with lü dou tang-like ingredients.

•speaking of which, bao bing are shaved ice/slushie desserts made with either, or both, beans, and lots of other toppings. A typical example might be like a red bean syrup, sweetened condensed milk, and boba or grass jelly or something else that appeals to you texturally. This is a particularly Taiwanese thing. bing su is a similar Korean dessert.

•finally, this isn't so much of a dessert but ba bao zhou, or "eight treasure congee", is often quite sweet, and has things like pinto beans, mung beans, peanuts, fruit, rice, other grains, etc.

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to Hi by catachresis

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"Welcome!" (In the constructed language I'm working on, pronounced something like "WEE-voot-MY", or ['wí.βɯ̰̀ʔ.ˌmɑ̰̀j] in IPA)

How do you feel about sweet preparations of beans? E.g. baked beans I guess, but especially actual dessert preparations, like how adzuki and mung beans are often used in East Asia?

As someone who doesn't usually like mixing "sweet" and "savory" at all, I didn't think I'd be a fan, but they actually make a ton of sense to me.

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by cute in shorts by lastfutures

Do you mean “slur”? Slang usually just refers to language that is very informal, (initially) particular to fairly specific groups of people, and quickly appearing, disappearing and changing.

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by masque in Silent K's by bloodrose

Funner fact:

English “bird” is borrowed from Esperanto “birdo”, inherited from Proto-Espero-Volapükic *bˤeɾdu, itself from Pre-Proto-Ithkuil-Nostratic *pqajl˥-tSɯʔ˩˨. Reflected in Toki Pona “waso” and possibly in Klingon “B'rel”.

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by ziq in by !deleted26641

I’d like to say that it’s at least increasingly common, especially among younger Jews, but it could just be my own echo chambers.

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yaaqov wrote (edited )

Reply to comment by polpotisevil2 in by !deleted19869

I meant that you are centering white people, not yourself in particular. Like literally using words like “selfish” and “tyranny” to refer to black folks leading a protest against the murder of black people... c’mon. To worry about whether or not white people can “express their emotions” in this context is precisely what I mean.

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by Majrelende in ACAB is problematic. by hiitsme01

Sure, I don’t disagree. Though, I did hear someone make the point that the intention of ‘ACAB’ is to be provocative, and thus start a conversation by virtue of its perceived unfairness. I guess ‘bad’ could do that? I don’t know

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by Majrelende in ACAB is problematic. by hiitsme01

I mean, I think the harm in saying ‘bastard’ comes from the fact that it still currently holds both of its meanings, no? The term’s equation of assholery with being born out of wedlock arises as a result of both meanings still being used... something like ‘bad’ only means, well, bad, today, as vague as that is. ‘Bad’ isn’t ‘bæd’. ‘Bastard’, however, still does work in maintaining patriarchy, even as its meaning is bleached and generalized in other contexts.

Were we to try to avoid words that had ever meant something oppressive, we’d: A) miss a lot, because etymological knowledge has a lot of gaps, (and drops off entirely a few thousand years ago) and B) have to not use half of the words we do know the etymologies of. Just the word ‘wife’ literally means something like “c*nt”/“shame” if you take it back far enough, for example. A thousand other innocuous words meant something shitty 150 or 500 or 2000 years ago.

I try not to use words like ‘bastard’ or ‘st*pid’ not because of what they used to mean, but because of what they still do.

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yaaqov wrote

I really recommend HyperRogue. It has solid roguelike gameplay (though quite colonial thematically), and it takes place in a world with hyperbolic geometry, a fact which permeates every element of the game and goes way beyond a gimmick—the game’s whole balance is based around it. Just go through the tutorial. You can get the game for free or pay for it if you want the most recent updates.

Built into the special options are ways to explore almost any kind of geometry you want, Euclidean, spherical, hyperbolic, connected, three and four dimensional, etc, if you’re into that kind of thing. It even has minigames that are designed for some of these other geometries

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yaaqov wrote

Reply to comment by cronal in Dinosaur Borders by ziq

Well, I saw them more when I was active in linguistics (and conlanging, in particular) online spaces. So that was maybe four to six years ago. Why?

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