throwaway

throwaway wrote (edited )

Genuine care for my well-being, and an ability to master their thoughts and emotions to a healthy degree.

...and I think I may have just found her. I'm being seized, my people.

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throwaway wrote

Calea Zacatechichi. Brew a tea on dried leaves, or roll it up and smoke it. It's got an absolutely horrible taste, but the effects, although subtle, could be what you're looking for. I used to smoke the leaves each evening. After about 30 minutes, I got a little more drowsy than usual and fell asleep as soon as I hit the pillow, which was nice, and my dreams became much more elegant, vivid and fantastic. I rarely have nightmares, so I honestly can't say that it'll help for that specifically, but I had a feeling of regaining control over my dreams, and also having more "fulfilling" dreams so to speak. I woke up feeling more refreshed than I used to. It may have the opposite effect of what you're looking for, though: your nightmares becoming more vivid. It's a very mild herb, but still, be careful: do your research, read some reports and come to your own conclusions. If you decide to give it a try, I'd suggest easing into it to get a feeling for what you're dabbling with before going full hammer.

One thing of note is that - for me, at least - it took about 3 days of smoking the leaves each afternoon before I really felt the effects it had on my sleep. When I made tea on the leaves, I never noticed any effects. Its workings seem to vary a lot from person to person; a family member of mine tried it, too, and it resulted in them not remembering their dreams at all, not even in the slightest.

There may of course be some merit to the idea that you really shouldn't be looking for drugs. Carl Jung, who is an absolutely brilliant mind in my opinion, has written a good deal on dreams and sleep - Jung may be able to give you a hint of where you need to start looking.

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throwaway wrote (edited )

Sure, good to hear it made some sense.

You're right, it's not easy. The healthiest - and trickiest - way to go, in my experience, is growing and understanding your Self. Children have a hard time learning from your words, but they take a bit of every little corner of your person from the youngest age. If your kid has difficulties letting themselves be consumed by one thing at a time, for example - drawing, playing or whatever - and has a tendency to get bored quickly, talking to them about it really won't do much good. Instead, chances are that you'll find the same tendency within yourself.

Of course, unsolicited parenting advice is the worst, so I'll stop myself here hahah. All the best, and good luck with the kid!

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throwaway wrote (edited )

One thing I've learned is that, when it comes to kids younger than about 6 years old, you're better off not posing them questions that doesn't expect an answer. It's what we do with adults, and it's second nature, but most kids take it at face value and have a hard time deciding on your behalf.

Instead, it's possible to phrase something as a decision without it becoming an order, and without giving the kid a feeling that they're being pulled around.

As an example, you're walking with your kid and have to cross the road. Instead of saying, "should we cross the road here?", you say, "let's cross the road here". It's pretty simple, but it makes a world of difference in my experience. Not just for you, but for the kid - they probably trust intuitively that you know this is a good way to cross, and are allowed to focus on just absorbing the world, which can be very overwhelming, especially to those younger than three or so.

Younger kids are best off with as little responsibility as possible - not because they can't be trusted, but because they don't need it - it's unneeded stress, in a time where they should be allowed a safe, secure and rhythmic everyday, allowing them to focus on learning to live. As they grow older, responsibility can be given gradually, and most importantly, knowingly; i got a whittling knife on my 6th birthday, given to me along with a very respectful talk on the dangers of a knife, how to use it safely and such - it was an awesome moment for me, because I felt I - not just my body, but my person - had grown and evolved, and my effort to live up the perceived "largeness" of this new world of sharp and good tools became very important. Had this knife been given to me in any other way, without the charge of sacred-ness, I'd probably end up destroying the knife, hurting living trees, or hurting myself more than necessary.

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throwaway wrote (edited )

He sure looks like a guy who'd humbly sow oats, with nothing but the greater good in mind. Did you think that was red wine in his glass? No, of course not - it's the blood of dead dominators, naturally. Selfless and brave, as always. A true idol for the worker.

What a pig hero.

Now, silence, as we pray to the manipulative power-hungry liar savior of The People.

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throwaway wrote

Reply to comment by Fool in it really do be like this 😔 by Ashy

Psychedelics, too. Enormous potential for helping with addiction, depression and other really shitty issues - in many cases with one single dose; not addictive; impossible to overdose; easy to produce; the list goes on and on, yet it's classified in the same category as heroin, and drowned in lies and taboo.

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throwaway wrote

Reply to comment by Ashy in New firefox tabs are too big 🤮 by moonlune

I got the entirety of Raddle riled up some years ago. Instead of sticking to a name stained by a tough period in my life, I abandoned ship and learned to be better. Been joining in now and then from good old throwaway.

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throwaway wrote

Reply to comment by moonlune in I did my dishes today :) by moonlune

Embrace it. People who hurry over everything are often either lost in castles of the future, or stuck somewhere in a better past.

I'm the exact opposite as you, I'm always doing, and doing as effectively as possible. On the good days, it's awesome; on the bad days, when the life I've set up expects me to keep up the pace, it's really very shitty.

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throwaway wrote

Hooray for moonlune. I think that attitude is sweet in general. I've been trying to walk slower lately, such a small thing, but it feels good. Constantly chasing the next big thing sucks, walking slow means everything becomes a big thing.

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throwaway wrote (edited )

Island by Huxley. I've only just gotten started, but I'm hooked already.

Loosely working my way through Faust and Thus Spoke Zarathustra, but I've read both of these before many times. The familiar is good.

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