snack

snack wrote

Reply to comment by Ennui in Friday Free Talk: 23 April 2021 by black_fox

I think you might be onto something here... I'd totally watch work-out videos of an exorcizing excercist / exercising exorzist!

As a non-native english speaker writing those last four words were a hell of an exercise in itself wtf

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snack wrote

So yeah I think you should bake yourself a cake and get some paintbrushes.

Hell yeah, i'll do that! I'll get brushes and make myself a ridiculously big cake with a shit ton of fruit and have some people over.

I just started a book out of procrastination, but i guess after i finish it it will be some time before i'll be able to read for fun again, so that is also a good thing to look forward to!

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snack wrote

haha butt slug

on another note:
if you were to reward yourself for accomplishing something, what would that look like?

i'm looking to motivate myself to finish a project and i want to try a different approach. usually i go for a stress-driven existential crisis strategy or just don't do it at all, but oh well.

First i thought i could bake myself a cake or make something else i enjoy eating. Then i thought i could buy myself new paint brushes, which is something i've wanted to do for some time, but i don't really like buying things. Then again, since it's supposed to be a special occasion this would be the perfect time to do so.
What else can you think of?

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snack wrote

That is indeed a difficult example, because it sounds positive. If i were to approach it purely analytical, I'd say that "crazy", in this context, is still used as something out of the norm, so far out that it is very noticeable or stands out very much - now that in and of itself isn't something bad, but if you keep in mind that you are talking about the living conditions of a human being, something that is considered to be wrong with their body or mind (in the case of crazy), just to describe something as outstanding - at the cost of hurting or triggering a person and maintaining an oppressive system - then i think it's not worth it to use "crazy" when you could just as well use "unbelievably" instead.

I'm not sure i could sufficiently explain what i meant, so ask about parts that are incomprehensible, that always helps me to word my ideas better.

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snack wrote

while i don't have any specific resources on hand (maybe someone else can help out with that), i can offer to share what i have learned so far:

Regarding "crazy": i'm sure you are aware of the stigmatization of mental illness or stigmas that surround mental illness, and how those can make it hard for individuals who suffer to get help. Sometimes people feel weak and ashamed for being depressed/anxious and therefore do not seek the help of a mental health professional, as they would with an eye doctor. (which can make their condition even worse) One of the reasons this happens is because society thinks it's okay to use "crazy" as a swear word, as something negative, that is: something which no one wants to be.

This is a complex topic and there are many more layers to it and perspectives to explore, so it's understandable if it gets confusing. I tried to open an entry point into the subject matter, if you want to discuss further or have questions feel free to ask/comment!

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snack wrote

Reply to comment by snack in by !deleted20335

in a predominantly white society, that is.

or maybe everywhere? when i'm picturing a shoplifting 45 year old american woman in a mall in manila i'm guessing her chances of getting caught might me slimmer than those of an actual young filipino male?

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snack wrote

haha, aw man, sorry. that sure sounds awful!

let me know how it goes, if you'd like to. the thing with oat milk is - at least in my experience & where i'm from - that it is not like milk, where you buy a bottle and no matter what brand it is, it tastes roughly the same. I found that there are huge differences in taste with oat milk, so you might need to experiment a bit

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snack wrote (edited )

Yes.

But also: I really think it depends - not only on the field, or the academic (person), but on the actual text itself. Now i can't talk for every field, but if i were to compare all the papers i've ever read, i don't know, they're all really different from each other. There's some that are really easy to understand, and others that take you forever - and it has nothing to do with their quality. I've read good ones that were easy, shit ones that were hard and vice versa.

that being said, academia definitely has huge problems with its communications - accessibility for one. Even if you were to understand everything, it's of no use to you if you don't have access. There's this argument in the open science movement, which demands that the public should have access to scientific research, because they are the ones paying for it.

edit: typo

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snack wrote

In cooking, or with coffee/tea i think oat milk works really well as a replacement for heavy cream, because sometimes it has a thickness to its consistency that's more like cream than milk, but I guess that's depending on the brand you use. Also I wouldn't know if the taste works with alcohol?

Other than that I mostly use coconut milk as a cream substitute, it's delicious, but obvs has a strong flavour, so it wouldn't be entirely the same drink taste-wise i guess.

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snack OP wrote

That's a good situation then.

I'm still kind of unhappy with the notion that there could be a situation where the friend who cleans would feel indebted to the other one, I mean that's the person doing the work. Why wouldn't the other party feel indebted to their friend, if anyone?

I'm not trying to argue with you or what you said, rather with this idea that sits deep in our cultural belief system - that someone who is in the 'weaker' position should feel indebted or grateful to someone in a more fortunate position, for helping out. I'm glad you said what you said, because it made me reflect on things I wouldn't have otherwise.

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snack OP wrote

I used to work for food too, or for a lesser hourly rate + food and was entirely fine with it. I think it can actually be a beautiful thing if you work for something else than money.

That said, it's also a sort of luxury to be able to do that. I was a student at the time and not that dependent on money, but as long as money is a means of survival with which you ensure shelter, food etc - in the long run working for food isn't very sustainable.

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