Comments

3

quandyalaterreux wrote (edited )

You can't signup on Gitlab with a throwaway email service, even Github allows you to do that (even though they flag the account soon but with a simple message they re-activate it). Generally whether a service accepts a throwaway mail for signup is a good indication of how tolerant it is.

3

quandyalaterreux wrote

First of all, the most important thing; Use the Tor Browser. If you're using regular Firefox with Tor as a proxy then Cloudflare will automatically offer you a captcha if your user-agent isn't that of the Tor Browser.

Secondly, if you do get a captcha after all try to use caching services if possible such as web.archive.org/save/ and archive.fo.

Thirdly, you can also use online proxies such as kproxy.com

Hope this helps a bit.

11

quandyalaterreux wrote

Many of those are redundant. uBlock Origin, HTTPS Everywhere, NoScript and Decentraleyes are vastly sufficient. You can get anti-fingerpriting protection such as canvas blocking by enabling privacy.rresistFingerprinting (in Nightly).

4

quandyalaterreux wrote (edited )

WebExtensions are not necessarily a bad thing, it's just that instead of phasing the old extensions out gradually, Mozilla decided to announce that within a relatively short while the extensions would be dropped completely.

Are you kidding? That's exactly what they did: They announced the deprecation of XUL/XPCOM more than 2 years ago: https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/2015/08/21/the-future-of-developing-firefox-add-ons/

6

quandyalaterreux wrote (edited )

It's only the default for 1% of new installs in Germany. And yes, I agree that they messed up with this, but we shouldn't definitely not spin up this into "Do not use Firefox, let's go to Chromium/Opera/... because they all have data collection". Firefox is really the only hope for an anti-Chromium monopoly.

6

quandyalaterreux wrote

This article would be of more use if there were a lot of better options.

The better option(s) is/are obvious: the Tor Browser.

As it is, I think its better than nothing for the fairly minor price you pay.

No, the point of the article was that VPNs are just "glorified proxies" and they're as worse as your typical ISP, if not more bad.