neverinNJ

neverinNJ OP wrote

http://www.ncid.us/national_initiative

The National Citizens Initiative for Democracy does not change or eliminate Congress, the President, or the Judiciary. Laws created by initiative must still be adjudicated by the courts just like laws created by Congress. The National Citizens Initiative for Democracy adds an additional check –– the People –– to our system of checks and balances, while setting up a governing partnership between the People and their elected representatives.

1

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

One can be whatever they want but those in the self-identified anarchist bucket are small enough group anyway and don't need further division with all that is going on in the world. Unless you are a law enforcement agency trying to break things up :-)

What I find interesting is that many people don't stay long with one thing whether religion or anarchist/political school. Yet somehow they reconcile that whole journey within themselves.

Life is too short arguing over xx versus yy while the ship is on fire and sinking.

4

neverinNJ OP wrote

WASHINGTON — Agents with the FBI and Immigration and Customs Enforcement have turned state driver license databases into a facial recognition gold mine, scanning through hundreds of millions of Americans’ photos without their knowledge or consent, newly released documents show.

Thousands of facial recognition requests, internal documents and emails over the past five years, obtained through public records requests by Georgetown University researchers and provided to The Washington Post, show that federal investigators have turned state department of motor vehicle databases into the bedrock of an unprecedented surveillance infrastructure.

Police have long had access to fingerprints, DNA and other “biometric data” taken from criminal suspects. But the DMV records contain the photos of the majority of a state’s residents, most of whom have never been charged with a crime.

Neither Congress nor state legislatures have authorized the development of such a system, and growing numbers of Democratic and Republican lawmakers are criticizing the technology as a dangerous, pervasive and error-prone surveillance tool.

4

neverinNJ wrote

In the Museum of the American Indian in DC, there is a statue of Washington and Oneida natives. https://images.app.goo.gl/SYyi6VeqCwR3otWt9

General George Washington and Oneida Nation Friendship statue at National Museum of the American Indian Washington DC George Washington Friendship sculpture at National Museum of the American Indian.

Edward Hlavka depicts Oneida Chief Oskanondohna and Oneida woman (Polly Cooper), and General George Washington. The statue is a commemoration of the bonds between the Oneida Nation and the United States.

2

neverinNJ OP wrote (edited )

Sometimes even Fox News reports news :-)

Five officers were drinking coffee at the Starbucks location prior to their shift beginning when a barista asked them to move out of the complaining customer’s line of sight or else leave, the Tempe Officers Association wrote in a series of Twitter messages.

Rob Ferraro, president of the police union, told FOX 10 of Phoenix that such treatment of police officers seems to be happening more often these days.

“It’s become accepted to not trust or to see police and think that we’re not here to serve you, and again, it goes back to -- we take great pride of the level of customer service we provide to citizens, and to be looked at as feeling unsafe when you have law enforcement around you is somewhat perplexing to me," Ferraro told the station in a phone interview.

2

neverinNJ OP wrote

Machi's parents have always put a lot of pressure on her, and now that she's in her late twenties, they want her to get married. The problem is that Machi's never found the idea all that appealing or had a successful relationship, so despite the fact that she's used to giving in to her parents, she's been resisting. When she mentions the issue to her friend Hana, however, Hana has an idea – she and Machi should get married, or rather, get a certificate of partnership, so that Machi can say she followed the letter of her parents' law. Machi agrees, but just because Hana's another woman, that doesn't mean that this will work any better than if she'd married a man…right?

1

neverinNJ wrote

This is a good article. But it didn't have a direct link to the working definition used. See https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/sites/default/files/press_release_document_antisemitism.pdf

News release on definition

https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/stories/working-definition-antisemitism

I provide this only to help others better understand what the working definition is. You can agree or disagree with it. But at least you now have the specifics directly.

2

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

Carole & Tuesday (anime series) ended. For a light sci fi series, it talked about refugee camps, social classes, role of media and spectacle. technology , impact of ai, loss of creativity, lgbt, and more. But mostly about music and the relationship of two young women.

Here is the Preview in Japanese -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBak9m0bcB0.

It is done by the director of Cowboy Bebop.

And it has the F***king BS song -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv3mLJKVZBs

4

neverinNJ OP wrote

According to the couple’s account, Ames was shoved to the pavement by an officer as he exited the car and handcuffed. He was then stood up, pushed against the vehicle and kicked in the right leg. When Harper emerged, the couple said police tried to wrestle her younger child away from her. She can be heard ordered on tape to put the baby down, and she responds: “She’s a baby, she can’t walk.” The baby can then be heard screaming.

At one point the man recording the scene and a friend yell at the cops to “calm down.”

Though the couple was detained, neither Ames nor Harper were arrested or ticketed, the Phoenix New Times reported. The store did not press charges.

4

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

From https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/vallejo-police-fired-55-shots-willie-mccoy-3-5-seconds-n1017176

The exact number of bullets that each of the six officers fired was not previously known, but Blake's report found that Officer Ryan McMahon fired once, Officer Colin Eaton fired 13 times, Officer Jordon Patzer fired 12 times, Officers Bryan Glick and Anthony Romero-Cano fired 11 times each, and Officer Mark Thompson fired seven times.

It's unclear how many of those bullets struck McCoy, but family attorneys have said he was hit around 25 times. The six officers returned to duty three weeks after the shooting.

3

Reply to Friday Free Talk by alex

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

Reading one of the books on the death of Fred Hampton. Cointelpro ruined/ended so many lives. What does the FBI say about that time? Read from the official site https://www.fbi.gov/history/brief-history/and-justice-for-all

One such operation was “Cointelpro,” short for Counterintelligence Program. Approved by the National Security Council in 1956, Cointelpro initially focused on disrupting the activities of the Community Party of the United States. Five years later it was expanded to include the Socialist Workers Party. The KKK was added in 1964, the Black Panther Party in 1967, and other leftist groups in ensuing years.

The goal of the operation was to get a better handle on domestic threats facing the nation and to prevent attacks by these organizations and their members. But some Cointelpro tactics went too far for the American people, who began to learn about the classified program after an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, was burglarized in 1971 by radicals and information was leaked to the press and Congress. In some cases, FBI agents had infiltrated groups, sowed discord among their members, and attempted to discredit their efforts—even when there was little or no evidence of unlawful activities. Hoover formally ended all Cointelpro operations in April 1971.

Though fairly limited in scope (about two-tenths of one percent of the FBI’s investigative workload over a 15-year period), Cointelpro was later rightfully criticized by Congress and the country for abridging first amendment rights and for other reasons. The upshot—as you’ll see in the next chapter—was stronger and much needed guidelines and controls over FBI national security investigations through a series of Attorneys’ General orders and congressional legislation. But the ensuing new processes and regulations also made intelligence gathering more difficult for the FBI going forward, ultimately creating an artificial wall between criminal cases and national security investigations.

...

Despite missteps with Cointelpro, the FBI had not turned into a secret police force as some feared. The Bureau continued to be accountable to Congress and to the American people. And in the end, it had played an important and sometimes overlooked role in helping to ensure civil rights and domestic tranquility during a turbulent time for the nation through its criminal investigations and intelligence work.

3