neverinNJ

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

The campaign vehicle featured a billboard of Islamophobic politician Pauline Hanson and two Tasmanian Senate candidates Adam Lambert and Mathew Stephen.

From Wikipedia:

Soon after her election to Parliament, Hanson's book, Pauline Hanson – the truth : on Asian immigration, the Aboriginal question, the gun debate and the future of Australia, was published. In it she makes claims of Aboriginal cannibalism, in particular that Aboriginal women ate their babies and tribes cannibalised their members. Hanson told the media that the reason for these claims of cannibalism was to "demonstrate the savagery of Aboriginal society"

Just sad that thoughts like this get published.

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neverinNJ wrote (edited )

The state looks for any excuse to intervene in people's lives. Using children's health is one of them. The unwritten rule is "We respect the right for you to raise your children anyway you see fit. However, at any time we may not like what you are doing, label and jail you." Because the State always wins in the end with the courts and law enforcement in their corner.

“We must explain to the parents before compelling them,” said Professor Georges Casimir, who led the commission that wrote the report, “but we can no longer tolerate this endangerment.”

Because we know best dammit. :-) Almost the same wording as the measles vaccinations rationale.

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neverinNJ wrote

It really depends how you handle stress, being your own organizer of time. Depending on your personality, it can be lonely. Universities used to invite speakers of all types. But that has appeared to be cut back. You may have to deal with conservative types or people you disagree with.

You can always try 6 months to a year and see if it resonates for you. You will get something out of going. But if you have pre-defined goals, you may not enjoy it as well. Plenty of smart people never stepped foot in a University. Make a couple trips to the campus. Talk with students . Observe and be honest with yourself.

Best of luck!

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neverinNJ wrote

You can come from a viewpoint of abundance and accept Raddle as the incredible sanctuary and resource that it is . Or see from a viewpoint of lack. I choose the former of acceptance and appreciation. Thank you Raddle!

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neverinNJ wrote (edited )

There is an exhibit case on him at the Postal Museum in DC. (Free). Not having a car was one of the factors made him hard to catch. Living in a cabin meant no neighbors to see his comings and goings . (Actual cabin is in the Newseum in DC.) His brother (Buddhist) read the manifesto when published and told the authorities about him. So someone following a doctrine not to harm lead to the arrest of someone that was the opposite viewpoint. While there may be points in his manifesto worth reading, behind the words was an man that brought about unnecessary harm to others. (Many were in the wrong place at the wrong time.) Killing 3 and harming 23 lest we forget.

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Reply to Friday Free Talk by alex

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

I started reading anarchist news web site today and was to sad to see more snark than usual. Some of us get in our own way and the way of others rather than listening, learning, and engaging in a positive manner. Yesterday The Last Internationale did a "surprise" intimate show at Asbury Park. See https://www.facebook.com/thelastinternationale/videos/342386986479082/?t=6

Beautiful mouth harp and wonderful blues jam. Loved their version of Ohio.

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neverinNJ wrote

I listened to Solecast and Magnificast podcasts. The former talking on how Canadian rappers unusual names was funny. The latter was on the New Left and religion. Sounds like New Coke. A manufactured product :-)

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neverinNJ OP wrote

IN EARLY MARCH, NBA commissioner Adam Silver could have chosen any number of topics as the featured speaker at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, but one question gnawed at him: Why aren't NBA players happier?

"To the outside world, they see the fame, the money, all of the trappings that go with it," Silver said. "[Our players] are the best in the world at what they do and people think, 'How is it even possible they could ever be complaining?' Some of these players come from difficult circumstances, and some of them are amazingly isolated."

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neverinNJ wrote (edited )

One day I was on a beach across from a navy base. They were doing an exercise. It was a cloudy day and you could hear them swooping by. Suddenly there was a break in the clouds and you could see a bunch of F115 fighters briefly appear and disappear. Seeing all that U.S armed might made an impression I won't forget. Especially if they could had dropped a stray bomb or two :-) Any military presence on any given day can be defeated. But it doesn't mean they will go down without a fight. Maybe time to watch Red Dawn again ;-)

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Reply to comment by neverinNJ in Friday Free Talk by alex

neverinNJ wrote

Sorry for your situation. Colleagues of mine were fired for asking questions to management. Management responded with an department-wide email on having a positive attitude. These employees were let go in a layoff round. Their work metrics were good up to then. The manager was let go later. Corporations want contented employees . But do "surplus labor" tactics instead that discourage this. They want to see your image in videoconferences. They want you happy while dealing with increasingly difficult situations. The level of social control has never been higher.

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Reply to comment by neverinNJ in Friday Free Talk by alex

neverinNJ wrote (edited )

Glad to! -- https://www.blubrry.com/jacobin/43035787/the-dig-against-idiocy-with-kafui-attoh/

Car dominance, public transit austerity, and the neoliberal political-economy within which both are embedded have fomented what Marx called idiocy, in its classical sense of privatized social isolation. Dan talks to geographer Kafui Attoh, the author of Rights in Transit: Public Transportation and the Right to the City in California's East Bay, about the political-economy of public transit and why the fight for transportation justice must be part of a broader struggle for the right to the city.

André Gorz's "The social ideology of the motorcar" unevenearth.org/2018/08/the-social-ideology-of-the-motorcar/

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