loukanikos

loukanikos wrote

I feel like the new thing is more the idea of water as a commodity than of wars being fought over it. Indigenous people know all too well from having their rivers taken away. Humans love a good fresh water source to irrigate with (or industrialize). I think a lot of wars in ancient times basically boiled down to disputes about water and soil also.

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loukanikos wrote

It's funny because I had an idea that growing trees and selling extra saplings might be a decent way for me to make some income if/when I leave the city. I was instinctively pretty certain that capitalism would have made that impossible to be a viable way to earn anything reasonable but now I am curious about it again.

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loukanikos wrote (edited )

This is probably too far but they are kind an embodiment of industrialized extractive systems to me. I mean, its just water, sugar, and thickening agent boiled with some flavoring. They are even made in sheets and then often cut into neat perfect little squares. They feel very dystopian to me. A cube of Turkish Delight truly resembles something that would be produced -- in an enriched form -- as fodder for subservient or enslaved masses in the perfect exploitative system. Sorry. But you asked...

edit: fodder not fooder

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loukanikos wrote

That would really be something. I hope we can make that happen someday. Hey I am Interested to hear more on your thoughts about grafts vs. seeds. I think you were telling me in another thread about an apple tree you grew from seed. Why do you prefer seed over graft? Is it mostly for the genetic diversity?

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loukanikos wrote

Finally watched The Man Who Stopped the Desert. Thanks for the recommendation. I thoroughly enjoyed it. The juxtaposition of a farmer from the Sahel against a bunch of suits from various "development" agency was very funny to me, maybe not in a good way, but I really enjoyed that. The movie was uplifting but also a good reminder that its not easy to affect the trajectory of powerful forces like culture and capital in agriculture. Also this isn't important, but that was really impressive doc from a production standpoint. Clearly it was very low budget but simultaneaously very well-done within the constraints they must've had.

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loukanikos wrote

I'm late to the party here but as others have said, periods referred to as collapses by historians are in some cases as long as 300-500 years or even longer. Its unlikely that there will be a sudden breaking point. However, everything is relative right? I feel the collapse will have been sudden if it happens in my lifetime.

So getting specific here: I consider the pinnacle of socially accepted societal success for the current order -- one might call neoliberal capitalism -- to have been around 1990-1998 (If you want to know why, I can share but just keeping it short here). I think that since then, neoliberal capitalism has experienced a decline and if the system is completely shattered by 2060 (the most likely cause of this would be fallout from climate change) then I would personally consider that a sudden breaking point.

Consider that on that timeline: an American born in 1995 who buys a home with a mortgage when they turn 30 might not reach the end of their mortgage before societal collapse. This is not only possible but highly likely. I use that example because home ownership and mortgages are a foundational aspect of the storytelling that neoliberal capitalism uses to justify its prominence and also an underlying cause of its decline.

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loukanikos OP wrote

I think this author offers some good points, although I am not as pessimistic as they are about the return of large predators. Probably this is a result of a difference in opinion about how many humans are going to be living off the land in the future. There is no doubt in my mind though that North American forests are currently plagued by deer, which like other ruminants, have a really detrimental effect on the regeneration of young forest.

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loukanikos wrote

Assuming you are in the US, the best way to radicalize boomers, in my experience is to relate to them how the world they built has resulted in failure. Ie: talking about how no one wants to have kids on a dying planet, no one can afford owning a house, people are choosing to emigrate, immigrants are going to other countries, China is outcompeting the US technologically, fish are dying, coral reefs are gone, etc, etc. Explaining to liberal boomers in particular how Trumpism is a direct result of unmitigated free trade and liberal elitist has been really effective in my experiences.

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loukanikos wrote

I could claim to speak as many as four languages, if we are rounding up. I'm including in that list a language I can understand pretty well but I barely speak/read/write. I understand it because its my partner's mother tongue and I hear it spoken all day long but many of the sounds remain difficult for me to pronounce. I've also failed to learn the alphabet but have no real need to learn it anyways. French remains my favorite language, followed by Persian -- although I only know a few words of Persian.

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loukanikos wrote

I watched Green Gold two nights ago. Really awesome and uplifting. I wish there was a better quality version available because as a 45 min doc, its like a perfect introduction to permaculture for those not yet in the know. I'm going to check out The Man Who Stopped the Desert sometime soon.

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loukanikos wrote

So its not Norse/Northern European spirituality but I was inspired by the same project you linked and I thought I would share. After I read the Keltoi Rising essay about whiteness, it made me want to try something in that space. So I decided I would celebrate the spring equinox without any prescribed rituals or anything. So I did that last weekend.

I think I need to come up with some more interesting activities because the way we celebrated was underwhelming; we prepared a small meal, ate outside, and then sifted compost that has been sitting all winter and planted carrots in it. So basically it was somewhat utilitarian and maybe similar to what I would have done anyways.

I've been brainstorming ways to make that event feel more intentional and special and build some traditions for my family and friends. Maybe Ill try to do something grander for the summer solstice.

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