lettuceleafer

lettuceleafer wrote

Since, all my classes are online I have been staying at my parents house. It's kinda a double edged sword as I appreciate seeing my kid brother but I was sick of talking to the boomers about 3 hours in.

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lettuceleafer wrote

"The only two criticisms that can be leveled at him are the rather tired, “he isn’t doing enough,” and his position on rather stringent gun control."

I think there are significantly greater problems with Sanders than just that. Such as, not paying women in his campaign fairly, crushing protests and sit ins that show him in a negative light, strong nationalist values and promotion of imperialism.

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Reply to comment by lettuceleafer in Friday Free Talk by vMU9

lettuceleafer wrote

That's such a self centered argument. Wikipedia currently has the boomer generation defined as 1946 to 1964. Jim Crow laws were abolished in 1964. Its absolutely insane of you to tell me that the african americans in the US growing up and becoming a young adult in a society under Jim Crow got "so much handed to them". What are you asserting that they had handed to them? Are you talking about civil rights? Its absolutely abhorrent to hope that a minority who had to deal with a society pushing them down should die for their privileges such as civil rights. When you make such sweeping claims you need to think about the people that don't fit in your stereotype.

What about the Japanese boomers that got put in internment camps in the US. What about all the Europeans that were attacked by the Nazis? What about LGBTQ+ boomers? Did they have everything put on a silver platter for them too?

I don't believe you honestly believe these things. I would have no issue if you said you don't like boomers that used institutional power and oppression to help themself and hurt others. But if you dont think about the words you use you alinate people. You don't know how the anti-boomer centiment might make a 90 year old trans man feel. This laziness in language might push people away whose stories I care about. You shouldn't tell minorities that they are part of the problem and they should die.

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Reply to comment by lettuceleafer in Friday Free Talk by vMU9

lettuceleafer wrote

I totally understand what you mean but I still question the use of the word boomer. I feel like it puts blame on lots of people who don't deserve it. I understand the sentiment of disliking lots of people that are boomers. Your ladder analogy is absolutely correct. Though I still greatly dislike it when people use stereotyping and us vs them language. It alienates people and centers blame away from the actual pproblem. But I'm open to seeing what I'm missing.

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Reply to comment by lettuceleafer in Friday Free Talk by vMU9

lettuceleafer wrote

I allways find the boomer vs gen z stuff super weird. Generations include everyone. I absolute dislike people that try to scapegoat problems from society onto groups of people. Dont try to blame problems onto a group that includes the elderly in severely impoverished societies. I dont like the idea that I should start blaming problems on the old lady across the street that has mobility problems. Yeah there are lots of boomers that are doing very well that have caused problems. Lets blame them and not blame people still struggling just because they are old. Can we just not make arguments that look like they came from 4chans pol?

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lettuceleafer OP wrote

I think people imagine that it's harder than it actually is. Plants are pretty good at living on their own if you pick a plant that naturally grows well for where you live. For instance sweet potatoes give great yeilds and grow pretty easy but carrots are allways underwhelming where I live. If you cant find anything helpful just plant 5 or 6 plants and see which ones do well. I would check online for best conditions for when you plant. The seed packet should tell you how deep to plant, how much water and how much sun it needs.

Basically once you plant it your job is to check on it to see if it needs help. If the leaves start drooping and it hasn't rained in a week give it an appropriate amount of water. Check to see if predators are being mean to it. If rabbits are attacking maybe make a basic fence. If catapillers are eating then pretend your ICE for a moment (horrifying I know) and move them to a different plant for them to eat such as a tree far enough away that they wont come back. I guess you could kill but its unneccesary.

TLDR toss it in the ground and learn as you go.

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lettuceleafer OP wrote

I have never heard of it before but I did find a definition and I can tell you my feeling about it when I read the definition I found. "While it encompasses many of the principles of organic farming, such as the elimination of all chemicals, Biodynamics goes further, requiring close attention to the varied forces of nature influencing the vine. It also emphasizes a closed, self-sustaining ecosystem."

I think self sustaining ecosystems are great but them are super hard to achieve and maintain. I would imagine it would be possible at an incredibly higher cost of food. Its attempted to make the fields self sustaining but there are so many factors at play which makes it challenging.

You would either need to pay someone or have great ability at identifying microscopic organisms. There are hundreds maybe even thousands of organisms in a field adding nitrogen to the field. Most of the time it's a neutral agreement as they help generally help but cause very little problems.

Crop rotations and integrating organisms to reintegrate nitrogen and phosphorous into the soil is very useful. though I think a closed system would still require maintenance due to unpredictable factors such as new pests or weather issues.

I think it sounds 99 percent possible but very hard due to economic costs. Maybe if the wealthy would be interested. But I dont know very much sorry if I misunderstood the concept sorry

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lettuceleafer OP wrote

You better figure out why they didnt grow as fast as you fucking can. Take for instance recently my dad was telling me how after a week his entire hay crop died. The 3 of them freak out as they have no idea why this happened. They call their seed dealer and the guy that sell them pesticides. None of them have any idea what happened. Then the crops got sent to the two nearest labs that process plants for disease.

What happened was a fungus in the soil that most of the time reproduces asexually produces spores and at some stage in reproduction the new mushrooms eat the roots of the plant and kill it. You cant kill it as you need the fungi for getting nitrogen into the soil naturally.

He talked to everyone that knows anything about plant biology to help him. There were many mixed ideas. There is protection against the fungus but it's incredibly expensive. He ended up finding a breed of hay that grows mature roots quickly. They tilled the ground deep hoping to get fresh dirt not containing spores. They planted these seeds and waited.

Thankfully this crop grew to maturity. But you allways need to be ready to eat some cost due to the sometimes random elements out of your control such as droughts and disease.

I guess the best answer is just do everything in your power to have them grow but also be ready for when things dont work out and you need to eat a large cost

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lettuceleafer OP wrote

Farmers have lots of skills to reduce costs. Subsidies help, many have gardens to make their own food so they spend much less on food, they dont require many services such as automotive repair, house repair, plumbing and fixing their driveway as they can do it themself. Many farmers have no retirement plan and want to work till they die. So most require very little money to live as their job covers expenses and they are skilled enough to reduce expenses.

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lettuceleafer OP wrote

It is definitely not unrealistic for someone to purchase land to become a farmer with no experience. I would mention though that the farming society has lot of freedom from capitalism most full time farmers get very invested in politics. Now is a great example of how detrimental the USs trade war is detrimental to those that sell soybean. Its almost vital if you sell products that go worldwide that you predict political trends. Though there are other methods to limit your need to follow politics.

It is very common for people in rural areas to have a chicken farm as a hobby. Typically they dont makes money but in my opinion it is the most ethical way to eat meat. It does have its disadvantages as coyotes, raccoons, foxes and opposums are very good at infiltrating coops. I've heard horror stories of how something got in the coop ate one chicken then ripped the head off the rest and left their dead body. In my area many people have had their chickens killed once.

I've heard good things about hobby farmers working 20 hours a week and selling at farmers market. They then can slowly get bigger untill they have enough capital to go full time. Farmers markets provide a fairly high price which is good since starting off you will not grow a ton.

If you have a safety net financially or family members to help you if you fall on your face then I would become become a part time farmer as soon as planting season starts.

Another option to think about if becoming a farmhand while you start making your small set up larger. The pay will be super shit since most farmers are mainly subsisting with some extra money to pay for things they cant buy. Though it's not all bad. I've learned so much from working there from plumbing, automotive, how to grow plants(ovi), general carpentry, power tools and even have helped build sheds. Where I worked there once I had general knowledge of an area I was treated as an equal. This was true of everyone that worked there. If anyone does try becoming a farmhand dont let them treat you rudely. There are tons of old farmers that would gladly sacrifice their beer money to have a youngster help them out. They will treat you well and respect you.

It's a lot easier to get a job then you would think. Its very common for salesmen to drive up to the farm and see if they can find the farmer around. Honestly just drive up and look around maybe knock on their door. It's best to do it after harvesting or planting as they have a higher chance of being home.

I wouldn't say there is one age where you cant farm anymore. I determine it the same way as you determine if an elderly family member can live on their own. Most farmers only quit if something fairly dramatic happens such as stroke or dementia.

Honestly I wouldn't call it idealism. Farming is becoming mainly run by large businesses and small time farmers are dying out. Though the popularity of farmers markets does give small times a chance.

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