kore

Reply to Against meal kits by ziq

kore wrote (edited )

This is a cool take, I like the analysis about the gentrification aspect, that it's professionalizing and gatekeeping something that's common human heritage. Never thought about gentrification that way before.

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kore wrote

Actually, "libreboot" doesn't ship to anyone. libiquity is one seller of libreboot-preinstalled laptops run by a former developer that ships to USA only. libreboot's founder runs a separate seller called minifree that ships worldwide.

See https://libreboot.org/suppliers.html

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kore wrote

yeah the pinebook looks wicked cool and is cheap too. Only thing is Tequila wanted 250gigs and this is max 128. There is a microsd slot though but it'd be "external storage". You could set it up to just get mounted on the desktop automatically though i guess.

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kore wrote (edited )

re: hardware and software support

hardware support comes from the kernel so it will be the same no matter what distro you choose and is usually quite good.

As for software any distro you choose with a well-developed package repository (Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.) will have a lot of software that you can just easily install, beyond that software compatibility for all Linux distros is the same (there are some gotchas but none that you'll come across).

The "ease of use" you're asking for mostly comes from your choice of desktop environment. For that you're probably going to be looking at either GNOME or Plasma

Re: InDesign, here's the perfect opportunity for you to go open-source :) check out Scribus

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Reply to comment by kore in Any interest in a raddle IRC? by nbdy

kore wrote (edited )

because the messages cease to be encrypted when sent to a client not using encryption. I guess it doesn't really matter too much since the room will be public, but something worth considering. Upon reflection I think host masking is the more important consideration.

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kore wrote

I would use IRC provided that: SSL is the only option for connecting and also ideally hosts are masked so IP addresses aren't public.

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kore wrote

Preface: I have not been following this and only really got an idea of what happened after watching this video, but I have watched a lot of her videos.

"Canceling" anyone other than repeated abusers/bigots with no remorse just rubs me the wrong way. I was truly appalled to see some of those tweets, I am really glad I'm not on Twitter cause I think I would either get extremely upset by this or worse start doing it myself. The Social Industry truly brings out the worst in people.

I also find it interesting that people seem to be upset about the financial aspect of all of this while they are literally making money for twitter by participating in the public shaming. Get off twitter!!!

Regarding "non-binary": My "non-binary" gender identity is primarily a product of my sustained, years-long reflection on dualistic thinking in general. So it's totally mind-boggling to me that self-professed "non-binary" people can be so essentializing when it comes to things that aren't gender. Maybe it's just the Raddle anarchist bubble, but seriously what.

Also can I just say that the background during that twitter montage is genius hahahaha.

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kore wrote

It's a shame she had such a terrible experience. Yoga's history is utterly fascinating, and we need more people curious about it doing and teaching modern exercise yoga. It's a little known fact that modern "yoga" practiced for physical exercise is only around 100 years old and is actually a combination of earlier asanas and Western(!) gymnastics/army calisthenics. Of course, the roots of yoga go back thousands of years, but it was primarily a spiritual practice aimed at liberation from suffering (this is a gross oversimplification).

Notably, any sort of movement based "poses" seem to be very modern, and from my understanding historical yoga poses were mostly static. And the yogis then were fucking hardcore compared to even the most stringent Western yoga classes. We're talking like, never sitting down, or standing on one leg for a whole day, or holding your arm above your head for the rest of your life.

I'm obviously an amateur when it comes to knowledge of yoga's history and you shouldn't really take what I say on faith. but the book Roots of Yoga is really good if you're interested.

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kore wrote

I think you are severely underestimating the power of recommendation algorithms. They have no bias, and it is a strange quirk of human psychology that we are attracted to extreme content. It is very easy to be made a fascist by the rabbit hole of infotainment. It is very difficult to seek out and critically analyze information to give one a balanced view of the situation. Take the anti-vaccination or flat-earth movement. People were totally manipulated. Or that Jordan Peterson guy. This is the case with any sort of propaganda campaign, even pre-internet.

The solution to this in my opinion is twofold: the first is to move towards platforms that are decentralized and not for profit, where the motive to stay is more driven by community than by addictive content. I see raddle as sort of like this. I don't really enjoy the bombardment of information, but I do find value in talking with other users here.

The second solution is to encourage cognitive security, a term I learned from /u/plast's essay available here. It is not enough to "hope" that our "ability to recognize those types of 'infiltrators' improves." Our ability to do that is already abysmal, has been since language existed, and requires extremely hard work to improve.

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kore wrote

An idea that is implicit in Neuromancer trilogy is that the ruling elites will become an extremely small population compared to the "masses" and will become essentially extra-human, that their access to technology and resources is just so much greater than anyone else that they have immense power. Power to the point that it actually makes no sense to talk of any sort of revolutionary act, as extremely powerful AI has essentially created a world without contingency in which the outcome of absolutely any action can be anticipated and thus corrected for. Very similar to cybernetic theories around the manufacture of desire by algorithmic manipulation of social media/ads and predicting outcomes via machine learning.

I personally think that this essay overestimates the speed at which the need for human labor is greatly outweighed by the human population. But obviously neither of those opinions are based on any kind of factual analysis.

I don't know, there's a lot to unpack in this. My initial impression is very skeptical, there seems to be very little of actual substance and it is very eschatological, which always makes me more skeptical. More and more I see anarchist writings paying lip-service to the idea of "desertification" without really saying anything new. A struggle that is nearly never mentioned among anarchists but that I think ought to be is the internal struggle to see things for what they are and understand how your thoughts are being manipulated by your environment.

/$0.02

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kore wrote

Plato's a fuckin weirdo, you can't really take what he writes at face value. I'm no expert, but his philosophy can be way more subtle than what people make it out to be. Cicero wrote about the Republic that "The Republic does not bring to light the best possible regime but rather the nature of political things—the nature of the city."

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kore wrote

I'm glad you said this. I also think it depends a lot on situation. Like when Obama was elected, things probably would have been pretty similar if it was McCain instead. But with Trump it doesn't really seem like that. There's also the case of local politics which I think is a completely different story, where elected people can put in some beneficial programs. As a random example take the idea of sanctuary cities in the USA. Those exist because people voted Democrat in their localities.

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kore wrote

3 grams = 300 10mg doses, enough for 6 people for E injections for 1 year assuming 1x/week. Or 1 person for a year 8mg/day oral.

You're right that 10 kilos isn't much though, easily grown by 1 person. That seems to be from a very specific yam only in mexico, so people in other climates may need more.

Thanks for the links. Those are pretty cool.

We shall see. I am optimistic about a basic level of safety, even if it is soul-crushing.

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kore wrote

What you're describing is propaganda and psychological warfare, which are some of the oldest tricks in the book. Nazis literally gave radios to people so they could broadcast propaganda to them. While the internet may make it much easier to spread misinformation, and much easier for people to latch on to bogus claims due to the amplifying effect social media has on controversial claims, I'd argue that it's easier for someone who is a skeptic to get multiple perspectives. 30 years ago it would have been nearly impossible for me to understand what recently happened in Bolivia, for example, because no stories from the people there would have made it onto American television.

I think one of the better solutions doesn't involve "technology" at all per se: teach people to think critically about what they are seeing/hearing and search for alternatives, evaluate things for themselves.

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