kore

1

kore wrote

After spending time on Raddle I really want to find a leftist forum that's more discussion-oriented.

3

kore wrote

"there isn't a lot to disagree on" is not the way to promote refinement of views and truth-seeking. Democracy benefits from minority opinion.

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kore wrote

I only speak for myself but it seems that Raddle is more about link sharing than discussion. More gets submitted than the people who regularly read this forum could ever discuss.

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kore wrote (edited )

If you look at the files on the github page it's pretty clear what's going on. I think it's just some sort of algorithm library. If by "offline search engine" you mean "free book that you can search the contents of" then yeah, it's an offline search engine... what a fucking joke.

4

kore wrote

I have no idea why the fuck she says that sexual difference only really crystallized in modern times. I agree that it's a product of civilization, it's a meme by now that hunter-gatherer societies tend to be more egalitarian. However, the Ancient Greeks were saying shit like this a 2000+ years ago. Women were disenfranchised. Medical theory held that women were literally undercooked men. The whole men having reason thing while women being impressible definitely has roots in Ancient Greece, Aristotle says that women were the "matter" while men were the "form." The whole seed/field metaphor too.

Hell, Hesiod (8th c. BCE) even says that women were created as a separate "race!" (Greek word is "genos")

"Then the gods and mortal men were struck with amazement

when they beheld this sheer inescapable snare for men.

From her descend the race of women, the feminine sex;

from her come the baneful race and types of women.

Women, a great plague, make their abodes with mortal men,

...

Even so Zeus the Thunderer on High created women

as an evil for men and conspirers in troublesome works."

It's definitely an interesting thought that sexual difference was used to justify that primitive races were inferior/less civilized, but I think the author's direction of causation might be a little off and her view needs to have way more historical nuance than it does.

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kore wrote (edited )

I think it's more of a caution against thinking there's ever a real endpoint. I like to think of anarchy as a means not an end. Doesn't mean we can't approach a "pure" anarchist society but the point is that we can't ever stop trying even if we think we've gotten there.

3

kore wrote

Ah, this was very helpful, thank you. It seems that crime, which the author never specifically defines but it seems like it's just anything that feels like a wrong to the victim, is a result of the perpetrator of the crime feeling that there is simply no other satisfactory retribution for the wrong committed against them. I hope that someday people will feel that community arbitration will provide retribution and they won't have to resort to physical harm in all but the most severe of cases (physical danger to themselves or those around them).

3

kore wrote (edited )

It's interesting how different soldiers fighting for an imperial country and soldiers fighting to defend their country from imperialists are. I would agree that risking one's life in war to defend the livelihood of their community is one of the highest forms of heroism, but as this comic makes clear WWII was not that for the U.S. soldiers, nor is the "War on Terror"

It's Orwellian how a villager in Vietnam defending his family and neighbors was truly more righteous and heroic than the U.S. soldiers and yet it is he who is demonized and the U.S. soldiers who are hailed as heroes. Seems to me like there should be a distinction of terms, it seems almost an insult to the defenders to refer to them with the same terms as the agents of an imperialist state.

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kore wrote

What's the alternative to the justice system in the absence of a state? Is it just like, the community gets together to decide if someone is guilty?

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kore wrote

Yeah I guess I'm not particularly sure about terms, but in the OP I wasn't referring to lawyers from e.g. the ACLU, who arguably defend people that threaten the status quo and state.

3

kore wrote

While her point is correct I see no real reason for her to confine it to just a "tool of whiteness" and not expand it to something like "white heteropatriarchy" or just "tool of oppressors." The Washington Post had a much better opinion piece about the same topic.

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kore wrote

The amount of times I've just wanted to become undifferentiated matter.... consciousness is a blessing and curse.

2

kore wrote

If you're trying to justify how radical you are by saying you're more radical than other people then you're probably not radical.

6

kore wrote

It's tragically hilarious that if you go to epa.gov and look under the "Environmental Topics" page it has "bed bugs" but not "climate change"

1

kore wrote

yeah good point, which is why taking control of municipal government and diverting tax funds to projects such as these (who wouldn't want a garden in their neighborhood?) is probably the most resilient solution.

3

kore wrote

You know, the day after the 2016 U.S. presidential election my school made class attendance optional and one of my professors, a very stuffy British scholar of humanist thinking, said "I thought the point of a liberal arts education was to be able to deal with adversity." This is the article I needed to understand that sentiment more completely.

"the insistence on the authority of their experiences by those whose minority status has silenced or marginalized them"

I agree with this, I feel like leftists (at least from the interactions I've had) have a tendency to just blindly accept a PoC or queer person or (insert minority) when they say that something is "white supremacist" or "transphobic," as if they are some divine judges.

"there is no contradiction between reason and outrage... We can respect the right of free speech without having to respect the ideas being uttered."

I said a similar thing one time, talking about norms for discussion, to the tune of "you need to respect people's humanity but you don't need to respect their opinions" and I was eaten alive. People's feelings getting hurt should not be put before searching for truth.

Damn this article is really fucking good, thank you very much.

5

kore wrote

how do i get past the paywall

1

kore wrote (edited )

Seems like she's upset at the institution of the writing MFA more than anything else. I just hope she doesn't confuse that with people like me who actually want to learn what her truth is so it can become our truth.

3

kore wrote (edited )

I study ancient history and there are a few examples of debt bondage getting so bad that some leaders actually remitted most/all debts. Solon is one example, Augustus and Hadrian are others. (Greco-Roman bias cause that's what I know)

Here's hoping that someone will do that in the near future. It's getting to the point that it's pretty obvious that the lenders and the state don't even expect that people will be able to pay them back and it's really just a method of control.