Comments

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jadedctrl wrote (edited )

I generally use Otter Browser (libre, QT5) since it's a lot lighter than Firefox, and it's config/data files are all tiny and easy to sync up across PCs. Syncing FF manually by it's profile-files (heh) is just utter hell. :p

Otter really gracefully closes and opens-- it takes less than a sec, even on a weak PC-- and even when you force-kill it (task manager, kill -9) it saves all your data, without slowing down or anything. It's great! :D

I would use Firefox 24/7 anyway, but my laptop from 08 is just way too weak and can only run Otter, jajaja

Otter doesn't work on some sites, though (most obvious, Github PRs), so I still use Firefox sometimes if I'm on desktop, or if I can't use Tor with a site.

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jadedctrl wrote (edited )

Maybe I'm naive, but I trust DDG well enough.
It makes total sense that they're using a feature how it was intended-- privacy is their entire shtick. I don't think they'd risk their image, that'd be fatally dumb.

EDIT: Though it'd be nice if their Onion address wasn't down 2/3 of the time...

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jadedctrl wrote

Maintaining lawns!

People'll spend hours every week watering and mowing the damn things, just to keep them exactly the same! They're not even really attractive-- in fact, they're kind of ugly.

I can get a garden, they're productive. I can get a flower garden, they're really pretty-- and sometimes even productive. But lawns are just terrible, bland, and an absolute waste of resources...

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jadedctrl wrote (edited )

Cater to how you like to learn. Different people like to learn differently.

I have this friend who likes to learn by going through books/courses, etc. And that works for him, it's perfect.

For me, though, that stuff's just excruciating. When I try learning that way, I just stop caring about whatever I tried learning in the first place, really.

What I prefer to do is:

  • Pick a simple project that you know you could do (easy enough to be feasible, hard enough that you've got to learn).
  • Skim the Wikibook or something on the programming language until I have just enough to lay the groundwork for the project.
  • Try to brute-force into the project, using StackOverflow and what I know.

… so basically what happens is that I learn more slowly than that friend of mine, but I have fun and manage to stay committed-- whereas with the other model I just end up dropping really quickly.

A lot of people recommend books and courses when it comes to “how to learn programming…” but that doesn't work for everyone, and that's OK. Just figure out which type of model works for you. :)

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jadedctrl wrote

Federation isn´t the best (distribution is way more ideal), but it´s the best we have right now. Distributed networks aren´t quite right for the sorts of large-scale social networks, etc. that are all the jazz right now, at least not what I´m familiar with (IPFS). They will be soon enough, but for now we´re kind of stuck with federation.

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jadedctrl wrote

I considered the BSDs-- and've been using OpenBSD/LibertyBSD exclusively for the past two years or so. (Also the default WM, fvwm2).

OpenBSD is so much simpler-- in every decision, process, you can actually understand what's going on. You don't need as much abstraction as with LiGNUx.
Packages are simply tarballs with some meta-data, which are made from a simple ports tree of make-files; a package repo is just one HTTP directory with tarballs and a file or two of metadata; the systems themselves can be compiled from scratch with incredible ease (documented in the man-pages, even!); installation of OpenBSD is incredibly straight-forward, quick, and still fairly powerful and flexible; services and daemons are started from (thank god) simple RC scripts...

I could probably go on ranting for a while...

Basically, BSDs are simpler and saner in design.

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jadedctrl wrote

maybe dysphoria is more of a social response than a biological one?

Hmm... dysphoria exists because we created gender, rather than dysphoria existing because gender exists. That would make sense. I mean, I've only ever had gender dysphoria, I've never really had genital dysphoria, so I can't comment on that-- but mine has, at least, been about how people see me. I couldn't stand interacting with people and them seeing me as a guy. That's definitely very social in nature.

But that doesn't explain trans people with genital dysphoria-- that is very physical, and very physiological. Some trans men say they feel like there ought to be something down there, outside of socialization. Or maybe they feel that way because of socialization..?

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jadedctrl wrote

I mean... I don't know if we can do away with gender. I don't know if it really exists outside of our social structures or not.

Is it purely environmental, psychological? Or is there something physiological to it? There was that study showing that trans people tend to have brain characteristics that are closer to their identified genders'-- could those differences determine gender identity? If gender is entirely environmental, then how can we explain gender dysphoria? Could it be that trans people have an identity they latched onto at a young age, correlating sex and gender roles, thus giving them the dysphoria they later develop? Or is it physiological, something that couldn't have been helped at all? I guess both could hypothetically manifest in the same way, right? So how can we even know for sure?...

I'm trans, and I've got no idea what the hell's going on. I've read a lot on gender in my days, and I'm still questioning it. I've been thinking about it a lot, especially recently. I'm kind of trying to logically justify my existence to myself.

Anyone have any thoughts to share on this-- Is gender "brain-sex", or is it environmental?

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jadedctrl wrote

You should get one of the Kobos that can run Debian-- like the Kobo Mini.
Check the installation here. It's not perfect, but it's probably the closest you can get to fully libre on a e-ink e-reader. I've looked a lot for one.

There is, hypothetically, another better and more perfect option: the Wikireader was a fully libre device dedicated to reading Wikipedia-- but you can easily execute your own compiled C programs on it. I got one a while back, intending to write a simple e-reading program... but then I broke the screen like an idiot. I'd love to give it another go, but I can't seem to find one anywhere! :ss

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jadedctrl wrote (edited )

That depends on your PDF reader— some of them phone home with metadata (like what you're reading, your IP, potentially more), like Adobe Reader (uck).
And some PDFs have Javascript in them, which definitely can phone home to basically anyone.

Don't sweat it, though— AFAIK, no libre/open PDF viewers currently support the Javascript engine, nor do they phone home. :)

EDIT:
GNOME Evince doesn't support JS, neither does xpdf.
KDE Okular does support JS, though-- so before using it, make sure the JS engine can be disabled, otherwise don't use it.

You're safe if you use xpdf or GNOME Evince, for sure.
If you wanna use a different PDF reader, make sure to research if it has a JS engine (and, if it does, whether or not it can be disabled).

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jadedctrl wrote (edited )

There aren't strict bans on out-of-line opinions-- other than, y'know, plain-out bigotry and reprehensible stuff. Though if you go into /f/communism and espouse liberalism, you're going to get a forum ban. I feel like that's kind of implied, why would you even try going there, lol.