happy

Reply to comment by /u/amongstclouds in Desert by /u/Ant

4

happy wrote

Empire, Caliban and the Witch, Pedagogy of the Oppressed and Baedan are all other things I've been wanting to read that I think would benefit from group discussions. I would be down to moderate with you if you want the help.

Reply to Desert by /u/Ant

5

happy wrote

Would it be possible/would folx be interested in doing a reading group for this essay? I've been meaning to read it and I'm sure others have too.

2

happy wrote

They obviously aren't going to call themselves anti-trans, but the reason that they are called anti-trans is because the ideology is against technological instruction that is going to allow trans people to get the treatment they need to transition.

An argument to this is that the desire to transition stems from the pressures of civilization. I think this is a misunderstanding of what goes on in a trans persons mind and could also be seen as transphobic.

3

happy wrote

From what I understand post-civ is non-primitivist while still being anti-civilization. Life after civilization has crumbled.

Post-Civ! is a good primer. Here for a more in-depth look.

I think I would define civilization as the idea of advancement for the sake of advancement. Similar to capitalism being growth for the sake of growth, but civilization will still have a desire to advance itself. Transhumanism and space communism as examples.

4

happy wrote

This question depends entirely on how you define a city. That said, I think this is an unfair critique, it is because of the centralization of people that allows for the efficiency of creating and transporting massive amounts of goods and is why our planet is not currently overpopulated.

Yes, the current model should be questioned and redesigned but I don't think cities are the problem, but the general consumption of living in capitalistic cities is the problem.

9

happy wrote

This is my westernized view and I don't know how it would hold up in the global south, but I don't think it is living in the city that creates the alienation, but it is living in civilization and capitalism that creates the alienation. People living in small towns aren't going to care about their waste either because it is exported out of town.

I think in a post-civ (not anprim) society the city has the potential to be something good because of the integration of different ideas, cultures, and people that prevent bigotry and further conflict. Even anarcho-primitives acknowledge that primitive societies went into conflict with each other and I think that in creating these ideal utopias avoiding conflict is important.

4

happy wrote

I'm familiar with Desert but I haven't sat down to read it yet. I think I know what are you trying to say now. When I hear nihilism and pessimism I think of ethics and not of philosophy so I was slightly confused but no I think I understand.

I would still love to read your response though.

4

happy wrote

Another thing that bothers me about Tesla and Musk is that Tesla is recieving huge government subsidies and investment for this greenwashed tech, while there are companies (one in the same city as Tesla's Nevada facility) that are working on the tech to turn landfill into biomass that are struggling because they arent getting enough investment.

On the same note, Musk and friends are literally profiting off of those government subsidies to run a company that is running in the red while selling products to the wealthy with negligible change in environmental impact.

4

happy wrote

With access to a grocery store it is cheaper. Beans and rice and much cheaper than meats and nuts are cheaper than most other meats.

Fruits and vegetables might be still expensive, but an omnivorous diet doesn't excuse anyone from needing to eat fruits and vegetables and I don't consider an argument against veganism, but an argument that fruits and vegetables should be more accessible. That is probably the capitalistic hurdles Rempiricalality mentioned that vegan PoC are most likely to face. Living in food deserts make veganism much less convenient and access to affordable fruits and vegetables should be available to all.

4

happy wrote

My post was in response to a discussion where infinity was explaining how they view homelessness to be less ethical than veganism. It was not meant to be in response to their own personal experience with homelessness. I apologize if my post came off as toxic, that was not my intention.

FWIW I am homeless too and I think the term is bogged down with negative connotations where the homeless are substandard to those that are housed.

2

happy wrote

If you see the reasons on why transitioning towards a vegan diet or lifestyle is important why not try and educate your roommates into a vegan diet and cooking them vegan meals. Maybe you've had to do this with anarchism or communism?

What is it about grains and legumes that you can't subsist on? They are easy to cook and season and provide wonderful nutrients. Supplement with adding fats and veggies and you're good (besides a multivitamin, but I think near everyone should be taking one regardless of diet).

5

happy wrote

I'm curious what makes you say veganism isn't cheap where you live; grains and legumes are staples all over the developing world.

Also, veganism doesn't take that much time dedicated to reading and cooking if you have the privilege of having a place and time to quickly cook and store food.

PM me if you have any questions or want recommendations or anything. I would love to help you with whatever roadblocks you are hitting.

Reply to comment by /u/Tequila_Wolf in poor kid by /u/Tequila_Wolf

2

happy wrote

Thanks! I read Alejandro De Acosta's critique of Desert Green Nihlism or Cosmic Pessimism and it made me interested in reading it but the strength of the critique also made me feel like it could be a waste of time. I'm already a green anarchist that sees the harms of civilization and humanity and I don't know how much Desert's critiques will change my own.

Raking through my thoughts about why I don't want to read it I realized that I would be better off reading it. Idk, I think I want to take a break from reading anarchist critiques for a little while. Nothing sounds that new to me and a lot of the rest is fairly pessimistic and I don't need that.

I would love to hear your recommendations though!

3

happy wrote

This is really f**'ng clever. Holy shit. I should probably actually read Desert instead of actually thinking I know what it's about though.