fortmis

fortmis wrote

Amazing. I'm going to download it for sure, and really looking forward to it.

I grew up Christian-ish and I really didn't come into contact with much Islamic thought until I started hanging out with other middle eastern folk outside of my family. Having lived in Canada, the reality is that a lot of the diaspora in my community were refugees or children of refugees from Islamic states/islamic revolutions, and for that reason, I think my perspective is a little bias. My mind is still open though.

He develops an anarchist Ijtihād first by criticising some of the ways that authoritarian practices and interpretations of Qurʾānic texts became regularised and naturalised after Mohammed, and that actually there are a range of what he calls micro-antiauthoritarian ethical imperatives that when that when applied become anarchic macro-relations politically. He combines this with a re-reading of Umma as independent of its current conflation in the present with the idea of a nation-state, for rethinking notions of kinship and community.

Definitely intrigued by this. On one end I don't find this hard to believe at all. I've seen this sort of approach applied to Christianity, with varying degrees of "success." Still, referencing what ziq recently mentioned, I too am a little skeptical about the motivation to find anarchy in religion. Not skeptical enough to not be super intrigued by it!

Going to look for this epub version now. Hope that by the time I've read it it's not to deep in your long-term memory, so we can discuss!

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fortmis wrote

Reply to comment by fortmis in PulseAudio by MHC

I guess the better question is, was setting the LFE all you needed to do for it to interact better with other apps? Or have different applications been responding differently to pulse?

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fortmis wrote

Reply to PulseAudio by MHC

I've had some trouble with PulseAudio interacting unpredictably with various different applications. Have you?

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fortmis wrote

Plenty!

Here she is playing the Liszt transcription (he arranged it for solo piano from the original piano and voice) of Schumann's Widmung ("Dedication' to his future wife and composer Clara), a freakin SHOW STOPPER -- although as an encore piece, the show has technically already stopped. So it's a show REVIVER.

Here's another Liszt, an amazing live recording/video, she's playing the Hungarian Rhapsody number 6, in 1966, a year after having won the International Chopin Competition. Liszt wrote a lot of music built upon melodies of Hungarian folk songs, and even a symphony piece about the 1848 Hungarian revolution, in which a friend of his was killed. He was big about Hungary getting independence from Austria. You're gunna want to put your seatbelt on for the last minute or two of this one.

Fast forward about 25 years, and here she is playing Chopin's 3rd piano sonata. The Largo (slow) movement is just heart wreeeenching.

Here is a live recording where she is playing Bach's English Suite number 2 in A minor. One of my favourite favourite Bachs of all time. Is it so packed with action and electriity! She plays Bach in an almost jazzy way and it gives it amazing flow and brings out the rhythm in such a way where you feel like you could dance do it. Here is a clearer studio recorded version, And here is a clip of her playing it live (I personally really enjoy seeing videos of people performing... especially when they look as entertained and amused as she does when she plays haha)

If you want more solo piano from her, she has several albums of solo piano recordings, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt eceteraaaaa

ok bye!

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fortmis wrote

working to make police both obsolete and a non-presence in their territories?

This is what I've seen work the best imo. Laws get changed and reversed all the time. I think it's more sustainable for people to develop ways in which they can function without police and protect themselves from police. Two quick examples are...
practices, developed and shared, of what to say / not say, do / not do, when confronted with cops (stuff like lying about not having your ID on you, certain defense moves, filming the encounter, your rights etc).
And on the preventative side, establishing networks for sharing safety information in a neighbourhood. Having a network of people you can call if you're walking home at night and feel unsafe for example. Lots of de-escalation training for everyone all the time etc etc

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fortmis wrote

I would love to read that book sometime. It looks really interesting. What do you think of it so far?

And ya, you're right! There's no harm in adjusting our naming of things. It's a pretty easy and effective step in the right direction. I just hope people (not directed at you) don't see a name change as carrying any more weight than it actually does. It can be the illusion of actual change and a distraction.

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fortmis wrote

You nailed it:

Semitic

/sɪˈmɪtɪk/

adjective

relating to or denoting a family of languages that includes Hebrew, Arabic, and Aramaic and certain ancient languages such as Phoenician and Akkadian, constituting the main subgroup of the Afro-Asiatic family.

relating to the peoples who speak Semitic languages, especially Hebrew and Arabic.

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