Comments

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Unfortunately there are hundreds of millions of Apple fanboyz.

And while I'm complaining, it irritates me to no end that Android has such a terrible software update standard. A grossly overpriced iPhone 7 from a few years back will get software updates for 5 or 6 years. A Samsung Galaxy Somethingorother from today probably won't get security fixes in four, maybe not even in three. Most other Android products are worse.

I keep kicking around the idea of getting a goddamn flip phone, and just buying a separate GPS and camera.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

While Tim Cook is right here, it's important to remember - not that many at Raddle would forget - it's simply about money.

Google, Facebook, Amazon, and to a lesser extent Microsoft make a lot of money by data harvesting. Apple makes a lot of money, but not by data harvesting. So in this particular case Apple can point a finger at the competition and criticize them.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Fascinating. I knew most new small businesses crash and burn. I had hoped something artistic would at least crash and burn without destroying one's social connections with the network of people that inspired you to start the project. It looks like it's even worse than, say, having your coffee shop or mechanic's garage fold.

Reply to comment by /u/GrimWillow in Friday Free Talk by /u/ThreadBot

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Most people's understanding of anarchy comes from films like The Road Warrior and television shows like Sons of Anarchy. So it's not a surprise. I didn't know it was a serious political philosophy until this past year, before then I thought it was a fancy label for "fuck everybody, I do what I want".

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

Articles like this seem to be a selective attack piece against electric cars. An electric car battery requires a lot of environment resources in its production, that production often occurs in places using fossil fuels for power, and during the actual vehicle's service life many of them get their charge from electrical grids using fossil fuels.

What's the alternative? Walk everywhere? Shoot ourselves? Keep buying fossil fuel vehicles? The logic seems to be, "It's not a miracle fix, so give up!"

I am not getting an electric car any time soon. But if I was contemplating the purchase, my hope would be for the local power grid to switch to renewable energy and my plan would be to install solar power myself.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

The people in power give speeches about this but fundamentally it's what they want. When a 65 year old needs to keep working, or a 75 year old needs to keep working, it just increases the supply of labor so the average cost of labor drops. Lower wages for all.

I don't know how anyone can retire. I make a crazy good income but saving the money to have a retirement that's more than Social Security plus enough money each month to heat a dog house is almost impossible.

Maybe it would work if we were all doctors. (Of course not, if we were all doctors then they would get paid $7.15 an hour too. Hooray capitalism.)

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Printer makers are like drug dealers: the first hit is cheap, but once you're hooked you pay through the nose.

This is one of the many, many places where fully open source hardware technology could save everyone except printer company shareholders billions all around the globe. But as critical as the project is, I see why it's not a priority for any open source team. I don't know anyone that gets excited about traditional printers, and it's hard to imagine putting in the thousands of hours a project like this would require when the topic is so mundane.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Agreed. I've read the argument that no matter how well-intended the original authors of intellectual property were towards 'the little guy' (independent creators and researchers), in practice those laws protect the largest and most powerful companies and individuals against everyone else. I'm convinced.

And the nice thing about these arguments is that they're compelling even to other capitalists. "What if I invent something and GE steals my idea! I need to be able to fight back!" "What would actually happen is that you invent something, GE files a bogus patent lawsuit against you and gets a court injunction preventing you from doing anything. You go bankrupt and don't get to build a damn thing."

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

This is a good message to get out. One of my teenage son's classmates died of cancer a few weeks ago, and in the years before they had "Keep Fighting ____" and "Fight On ____!" fundraisers and pep rallies.

I lost a four year old cousin to cancer last year. Damn. I often wonder how far we would get if we took half the resources wasted by capitalism and especially the military industrial complex and put it into medical research.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

To latch on to a tiny part of the story, those video game boycotts over historical inaccuracy infuriate me. The last time I checked, when an ancient Roman died in battle he couldn't resurrect thirty seconds later with fresh gear and keep fighting. I'm pretty sure that actually never happened. So who gives a fuck if we make the game more enjoyable for anyone who wants to play a female character?

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

No argument. With respect to Noel Ransome's original article on a black Superman, I have mixed feelings for only one reason: it looks like they're keeping Gal Gadot in the Wonder Woman role. If they're going to pretend continuity with the other films then it would be a bit odd for Superman to be black, just as much as it would be odd for Batman to suddenly be Indian and Aquaman to suddenly be Korean.

On the other hand, if the upcoming Wonder Woman 1984 is a last hurrah for the current series and we're getting (yet another) reboot, then sure use the fresh start to make comic heroes about more than just white men. With the sole exception of heroes whose core concept is based around racial identity, like Black Panther or Luke Cage, everyone else should be able to have any racial or sexual identity. I don't give a hoot if the whole damn Justice League were, for the sake of argument, black women. The stories of maintaining a secret identity, moral dilemmas, and super powered fist fights would be just as fun and interesting.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

They are rebranding a lot of existing free software projects. It looks like they give due credit to the original sources, but I'm not sure that kind of centralization makes sense. I think the rebranding everything with 'Frama' is also dishonest because it implies shared architecture, shared programming languages, and the general idea that if you can set up and run one of these products you can do that with all of them. In reality the use all kinds of wildly different tools and programming languages and data storage and so forth.

I suggest two alternatives to evaluate. The first is the equally free-as-in-freedom https://sandstorm.io software, which you can host on your own or pay someone else to host for you. It has the great majority of the software on that page integrated with it through a unique-to-sandstorm sandbox design. I have no formal affiliation with the project but I host my own instance of the software. Installing Sandstorm requires some technical expertise, but installing a document sharing web application, blog, git server, presentation software, etc... inside Sandstorm is just a few clicks.

The second is the Beaker browser ( https://beakerbrowser.com/ ) and the dat distributed protocol it's built upon. Right now it has fewer features and fewer options than the original options linked in the post or Sandstorm. But I think the underlying design is better. You run the Beaker browser as though it was Firefox or Chromium, but 'dat applications' you run and content you host are shared directly from your own computer. Your machine is the server. The average person doesn't have the interest, technical skill, or money to host their own degooglisons/Sandstorm/Nextcloud/Email or pay someone else that respects freedom to do it for them. Beaker and dat dramatically lower the end user barrier to entry.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I use DuckDuckGo on some of my machines and Ecosia ( https://info.ecosia.org/about which is a non-profit based on Microsoft's "bing" search engine that takes its advertising revenue and - supposedly - uses it to fund planting trees).

What I really want to see is something like Yacy ( a distributed, decentralized, open source search engine ) https://yacy.net/en/index.html not suck.

Reply to comment by /u/00420 in Friday Free Talk by /u/ThreadBot

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Loving your job when you're self-employed isn't, as far as I know, as big a contravention of anarchism as loving a job where you work for someone else.

On top of the other numbers I mentioned, my out-of-pocket costs per the year are capped at an additional $4,500 in-network (and another $18,000 out-of-network). So as long as I stay in-network for medical care, my costs can't exceed $8,500 in premiums plus $3,000 in deductible plus $4,500. That's still an obscenely high number, but unlimited. You have no such cap, or the cap is way too high?

Reply to comment by /u/ziq in Star Trek or Star Wars? by /u/ziq

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

They're both entertaining but fundamentally flawed to an anarchist.

Star Wars has royalty even among the rebels and everyone looks to Jedi and Sith for leadership.

Star Trek's society is a utopian vision of authoritarian socialism, which is as realistic as utopian libertarian capitalism. Nobody rebels because the society they live under is unimaginably better than any real authoritarian socialists (or libertarian capitalists) would create, even with 24th century technology.

Reply to comment by /u/00420 in Friday Free Talk by /u/ThreadBot

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

It's a wonder anyone can afford it. My employer pays $15,500 per year for my family health insurance, and I pay $8,500 - and have a $3,000 deductible. (Edit: a friend of mine is self-employed and pays $40,000 per year for the health insurance for his family. His wife has medical issues that would cost $10k+ per month if they were uninsured.)

Depending upon your income level, you may qualify for Medicaid. In different areas it's harder to get and in many cases it's difficult to find doctors that accept it. But I have one family member that's been on it for a long time with adequate care in Arizona, and my parents were on it for two years in their early 60s and still got good care in Pennsylvania.

Reply to comment by /u/mofongo in Friday Free Talk by /u/ThreadBot

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I'm sorry for all of it, especially the back and hip problems. Living with constant pain is brutal.

If you can afford it - and it's a terrible, terrible world that I have to add that disclaimer - I would see another doctor. My layman's understanding is that being underweight is as terrible for your health as being morbidly obese, and further that muscle mass can do a lot to protect and isolate bad joints. Take that wild speculation for what it's worth.