Comments

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Good question. I'm curious to see what other books and resources are suggested.

I found an autobiography by disgraced Soviet general Grigorenko. Most of the people in his home town in Ukraine were starved to death by Stalinist policies in the.. 1920s, I think. He lost dozens of friends and colleagues to execution for treason, and it wasn't until years later he realized they were guilty of nothing and confessed because they were being tortured.

Admittedly Grigorenko was accepted by the West and ends his book praising capitalism in the US. So it's hard to know how much of the book was propaganda by the US. But the stories are horrifying.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I haven't done an in-depth analysis, but my fear of proof-of-stake systems is that they concentrate wealth in the hands of the early adopters and wealthiest investors. The people who make the most new coins are the ones that have the most existing coins.

That's better on energy terms than the proof-of-work that the original Bitcoin uses. But that wealth concentration is not the solution I want. I'm not sure what is better.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I'm confused by the picture. It looks like the two statements are making the same point, but the second person is speaking as though the first had the facts backwards.

If anyone has the time and interest, could they please explain it to me?

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

BSD licenses smells like anarcho-capitalism

A debate over that license and others like it - Apache, MIT, etc... - drives me crazy, because advocates of them say, "It's more free than the GPL! If I distribute BSD license code, the recipient can do anything they want with it. If I distribute GPL code, the recipient has to redistribute under the same license! BSD = more free!" But of course, that ignores the second, third, fourth, fifth, and nth level recipient. The second through nth level recipients of BSD license code are guaranteed zero rights. The second through nth level recipients of GPL license code are guaranteed the same rights as the original author and first recipient.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

In my experience, most people that experience some kind of political awakening or change experience it on a personal level in one domain first. A small portion expand from there, most others cling to their original beliefs and shoehorn in an exception.

For example, someone with Judeo-Christian beliefs comes to be vegan for ethical reason but ignores the fact that their religious writings are loaded with divinely sanctioned non-vegan meals. I still think using the term piracy for copyright violation is ludicrous, but anyway a so-called pirate rejects copyright laws and the ideas behind them. But the pirate never notices how capitalism and copyright laws are linked. The FOSS developer sees proprietary software and all of the freedoms it removes as an abuse of copyright and doesn't see that copyright itself is the problem. And so forth.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

It helped a lot, but not as much as we would like.

Verizon still stopped rolling out FIOS high-speed broadband to new areas because their wireless service is so much more profitable.

Last I checked, most of the gigabit options from other ISPs still cost significantly more than from Google too. But to be fair, price is dropping. Comcast started offering gigabit internet in my area a few years ago for $300 per month. Now it's $105. That's much better than $300 but still 50% more than the $70 for gigabit internet that people in Kansas City can get from Google Fiber.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I'm late to the party. The Racket language is a form of Scheme, and it's got a fair bit of educational materials. The language creators are trying to make it more widely used, but it's not that popular (yet?)

http://racket-lang.org/

I also like GUILE Scheme, which surreal referenced below. But I don't think the introductory material is as newbie-friendly as for Racket.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I prefer Lisp to Python but I like them both and see no reason to shit all over any language. If someone wants to build a program in Brainfuck, more power to them.

Just to annoy foobar, someone should rewrite this in HyLang ( https://github.com/hylang/hy ) - a Lisp in Python.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

I could have sworn Raddle had a discussion about this a month or two back, but I can't find it.

I think free-as-in-freedom software is an essential tool for uncensored communication and privacy. And from that, it's a critical tool for anarchists. So I'd say most Raddle'ers have a partial alignment with Stallman and the FSF there.

But otherwise, he's a capitalism advocate. He sees all of the attempts at proprietary software, abuse of copyright laws, patent laws, and digital rights management (DRM) as flaws in the modern forms of capitalism. He has an ideal of a free market in which they are all removed. For me and for most others here, we see those things as inevitable byproducts of capitalism and impossible to remove while preserving capitalism. (That is, if you outlaw those things in a capitalist society, people who could make money by bringing them back will find a way to bring them back.)

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Sorry I'm late to the party. For a quicker route to hosting your own email I recommend https://mailinabox.email - it's a combination of a howto guide and a program (shell script). The howto walks you through renting a server and setting up DNS. The shell script sets up the server for you, you just answer questions like "What is your name?" and "What domain name did you buy in the DNS service?" and so forth.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

For a secure distributed social network: Secure Scuttlebutt ( https://www.scuttlebutt.nz/ ) - I'm setting up but haven't used it much yet.

For secure distributed file and other content sharing: The "dat" protocol and Beaker browser ( https://beakerbrowser.com/ ) Closest to ready for regular users, but still not easy.

For hosting your own email: Mail-in-a-Box ( https://mailinabox.email/ ) - you need to be pretty tech-savvy to use it.

For distributed, decentralized, impossible-to-censor search engines: Yacy ( https://yacy.net/en/index.html ) - currently it works pretty poorly. Every time I tried it, it ran but gave me junk results.

For distributed, decentralized, server resource hosting for web applications: SAFE Network ( https://safenetwork.tech/ ) - some places group it with cryptocurrencies but the concepts behind it are different and it might be feasible. I'm watching it but not trying to use it yet.

And I like the idea of secure, untraceable currency transactions through cryptocurrencies but most existing cryptocurrencies are just energy-intensive pyramid schemes.

Many other similar such projects in all kinds of categories exist. But none have reached the "click to install and go!" stage.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I don't know what form the collapse will take, but it's my firm belief that open source, decentralized, federated communication software of all kinds will be a key component.

The current internet is structured to funnel all human interaction through Google, Facebook, Amazon, and similar companies and tools. They harvest your data and bombard you with advertising and propaganda.

When we cut the advertising, tracking, and propaganda out I think the nature of political discourse and the content of popular political ideas will shift.

But good tools for all of this either don't exist today, or are too complicated for most people to use.