deeppurplehazedream

deeppurplehazedream wrote

I knew it! So, basically a closet Capitalist. The Freudian, Jungian, even Lacanian traces in your posts were obvious to anyone who summarily executed even the slightest interest in post-closet anti-reverse psychology. But, are you out of the closet? Really? Or are you just saying you are to throw the thought hounds off the trail?

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

A Disney thing. Seems to be available to torrent. Good scores on Rotten. As Mashable article puts it:

‘Owl House’ is a perfect pick for a Halloween binge ... there’s plenty for kids of all ages to enjoy.

When I think Disney I think Cinderella syndrome. Maybe this is kind of anti-Cinderella?

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deeppurplehazedream OP wrote

From the article:

Geofence warrants are intended to locate anyone in a given area using digital services.

Geofence warrants are essentially a fishing expedition: Investigators know roughly where and when a crime was committed, and want to find out who might have been nearby at the time.

For multiple suspects, the FBI eventually gathered a wide set of Google data, including recovery numbers and emails, and dates on which the accounts were created and last accessed.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

I was married for a several years. It made my family, especially my parents, quite happy. Alas, it did not take. However, I am back with the same person in what some see as an unholy alliance It seems to be working out for us. My partner does insist on pure monogamy and so there's that. I did like the marriage ceremony part about to love and to cherish, 'til death do us part et al because I believe in being committed to building a life together, while recognizing the possibility that it may not work out. I feel like we are more equal and respectful toward each other now if that makes sense.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

Liberals trying to make the police work better, only to discover they can't, but they insist working within the system is the only reasonable choice. Maybe it'd better to defund the police and use the money for other means of social control if you want to work within the system. Abolish the police or at least keep the issue of abolition at the forefront as the goal. This being one part of a more general critique of the state would be my position even if it's "hopeless".

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

I once was a proprietor, so, pettiest of bourgeois. For me it was better than working for someone else. I felt I had more freedom. I was still beholden to the Big Corporation that let me be a dealer. I know some small business people and in general they tend to be extremely conservative, even the ones who don't want to expand and be bigger capitalists, so ideology is one problem. Is someone who owns or is buying land and farming a capitalist? As others have suggested, it's complicated.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

I would emphasize beguiling more than the promise. Crypto, like the entire internet, is dependent on the State/states to operate and mining is extremely power intensive. So, like all new technologies crypto does have “possibilities” -but both good and bad. So my thinking is that Crypto requires centralization to operate it ends up being not so much a decentralized technology as a means to tie people even more into the system. We end up with not a decentralized system, but a distributed part of a highly centralized system. So when you look at crypto in isolation it sounds a lot better than maybe it really is.

The Economist is hardly a radical ‘zine and undoubtedly most of its readers are capitalists, or as wikipedia puts it "a high-income and educated readership". The point of the article for most of those readers might be more of to get them to start thinking about and then trying to find ways to exploit and profit from crypto under the banner of free markets.

That doesn’t mean we can’t find different interpretations and uses though. Crypto does have an anonymous private secret side to it which is no doubt a real big part of the attraction and much of the promise lies in just that. And I’m not just saying all this because I lost $107 to the crypto-void.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

Remember way way back in the 90's when those wide-eyed idealists thought the internet could make the world a better place, a step toward freedom, even "democratize"(sic) it? What could go wrong? Isn't all new technology good technology or at least neutral? Now I wish I could get off the internet completely. It's probably too late for me, but... maybe...you can save yourselves!!!

Not.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

The footnote in the edited version now says:

This article was amended on 7 September 2021. One section of the Q&A was removed by editors because the interview and preparation of the article for publication occurred before new facts emerged regarding an incident at Wi Spa in Los Angeles. The consequent lack of reference in the relevant question to this development, in which an arrest was made for alleged indecent exposure at the spa, risked misleading readers and for that reason the section was removed. This footnote was expanded on 9 September 2021 to provide a fuller explanation.

Does anyone (OP?) know why this was done?

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