chakarera

chakarera wrote

I cited India and Syria to counter the author's idea that veganism/animal rights was unnecessary and didn't exist pre-Westernization and pre-industrialization. The author wrote an article about their experience as a native Hawaiian living in midwest USA. Which is great, except that the author didn't frame it that way, she wrote it as if what she was saying is true in general, which for her points 2 and 4 is just wrong.

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chakarera wrote

I agree with a lot it, but I think there's a lot of stuff in their that's just wrong or problematic. I'm too lazy to right a full response, so I'll just say the main thing is the author has a belief threading through everything, that she thinks veganism/vegetarianism/animal rights is a western/industrial/white people thing. She states this explicitly:

Okay, let’s be blunt: veganism, vegetarianism, and the animal rights movement are only necessary to begin with because of colonization.

Animal rights and treatment weren’t a concern pre-contact, pre-Westernization, or pre-industrialization because animals were viewed as relatives, not commodities.

Ironically, she's the one whitewashing history and ignoring indigenous voices. As far as I know, animal rights and vegetarianism originated at least 10,000 years ago in India, probably with the development of agriculture, with the philosophy of 'ahimsa' (non-violence) and that killing animals was violence (made unnecessary by agriculture). The first person (that we have written documentation of at least) to live and advocate a total rejection of animal exploitation equivalent to modern day veganism, was Al-Maʿarri. Even today, veganism and especially vegetarianism is way more common outside the 'west'. People in the americas pre-contact, went to war, practiced human sacrifice, made empires with some groups ruling over and opressing others, etc. Some were egalitarian peaceful societies, some were patriarchal violent warmakers. Some did fucked up things to animals. I understand indigenous people are in a conflicted situation cause colonizers attempted to destroy their traditions, but that doesn't mean all their traditions are automatically good and beyond critique. With critique meaning reflection from within their community, cause of history of colonization I agree it's very problematic for white animal rights activists to critique indigenous traditions, especially when white animal rights activists have way way way more animal abuse going on in their on in their own backyard to critique. But in my experience it's white non-vegans that make racist critiques of non-whites for eating "weird" animals, and it's vegans that call them out saying ya'll are racist hypocrites, stop eating meat before you criticize them.

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chakarera wrote

It's mostly russian but there's also an english section. You can use google translate to read, and contact people (everyone understands english) you want to buy or sell or work with. I'm not active on any forum or market now, I have enough contacts to work with, but I hear after the alphabay shutdown, english hacking, carding, and bank fraud mostly moved to telegram groups. exploit is the only public forum I'd recommend though, it has serious people on it. In general russian language forums have a lot more professionals and serious people and english language forums are 95% time wasters, kids, scammers, and whitehat security researchers and police accounts.

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chakarera wrote (edited )

Learn to hack. Everyone whose a good developer can, with a few months of study, transition to black hat hacking. And you get to live with a cleaner conscience fighting the system instead of working for it.

Edit: to get started I'd recommend reading this guide from a rad anarchist hacker (in english) (in spanish). I'd learn a lot more phishing than what's covered there, and powershell is out of style now as it's detected too easy by AV now, research those tools and techniques in C#, and you're good to go. The best public computer crime/hacking forum is exploit.in

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chakarera wrote (edited )

I love this post, I'm liking this place more than r/anarchism already. There they throw around "no ethical consumption" and accusations of "lifestylism" as insults, as if trying to live out revolutionary values is somehow a bad thing. The opposite is true, if you're not making radical changes in your own life, in how you live and relate to others and the environment, there's no way you're working towards any genuine change in the world.

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chakarera wrote

As far as I understand, with b12, methylcobalamin is better absorbed than cyanocobalamin but slightly more expensive, and injections work best followed by sublingual tablets, followed by chewable tablets. Though chewable cyanocobalamin works for most people (I had mild deficiency and it worked for me), but with a long term severe b12 deficiency people lose the ability to absorb or convert it or something and only respond to injections.

With vitamin D it's obviously preferable to spend time outside and get enough sunshine rather than supplement. But it requires anywhere from 15 minutes to a couple hours a day, depending on how much skin you have exposed, how dark your skin color is, and how sunny it is, to get enough. And not everyone can do that depending on their lifestyle. Now I am outside plenty and don't need to supplement but years ago I was working inside from before sunrise to after sunset and got zero sunlight except a little on weekends, and developed vitamin D deficiency that I fixed taking supplements. d3 is more effective than d2, but more expensive and also not normally vegan. Now there is vegan d3 produced by some kind of lichen. After the industrial revolution with babies being raised without sunlight rickets became a big problem until they started adding d2 supplement to milk. vitamin D deficiency isn't nearly as serious as b12 but can cause low energy/fatigue and bone health problems, I think it's recommended for vegans to supplement if they can't get enough sunlight.

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chakarera wrote

https://veganhealth.org/b12-status-of-raw-foodist-vegans/#Finland

In a study of some people consuming 2kg a day of home made ferments, half developed b12 deficiency. It seems in theory we should be able to get enough b12 from ferments and seaweed and stuff but they also contain ineffective b12 analogues so it's hard to study and we don't really know how to reliably get enough b12 on a vegan diet without supplementing.

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chakarera wrote

  1. It's really not questionable, b12 deficiency is a real thing with very serious health consequences and is fixed with supplements all the time. And it's not just a vegan issue either, I'm vegan now but years ago when I was omni I had low b12 (from blood test) that I fixed with supplements.

Yes I agree with your other points and would like a reliable non-animal source of b12 that we can make ourselves. But what do you think about https://veganhealth.org/vitamin-b12-plant-foods/ ? As far as I understand, it is possible to get b12 from natural plant sources, but it isn't well understood how to do so reliably, and a lot of people that tried developed deficiency and health problems.

And I don't want to risk my own health so I keep taking b12 supplements. And I want healthy comrades so I strongly recommend other vegans to supplement b12. (omnis are already supplementing indirectly as cobalt and b12 is added in mass to animal feed, cause if they're pastured raised soil is cobalt depleted nowadays and if they're factory farmed inside eating grains they don't get b12)

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chakarera wrote

https://veganhealth.org/vitamin-b12/

The bacteria that produce kombucha, tempeh etc don't produce b12, it's possible in DIY style setups b12 producing bacteria is present from contamination. In communities were people ate vegan diets and believed they got enough b12 from fermented foods or soil or whatever, some develop deficiency, some don't, there's no known reliable non-animal source besides supplements. Considering how cheap and easy it is to supplement and the serious harm from deficiency it's irresponsible to not recommend vegans supplement b12.

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chakarera wrote

The bacteria that ferments tempeh doesn't produce b12. There was a study where they tested random samples of tempeh from some street markets in jakarta and some had varying amounts of b12, probably from contamination with bacteria that does produce b12. Tempeh sold in the west does not have b12, there's more food safety regulations and it's fermented in an otherwise sterile environment.

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