celebratedrecluse

celebratedrecluse wrote

Truly, I have very little desire to do violence, even in my most angry moments. There is so much work of caring and healing to be done, of cultivating and loving the seeds of the earth-- this is totally devalued, drains you of energy, and yet I continue to believe that it is the most important thing in the world.

The system will do plenty of violence, and be able to take plenty back. There are moments where we will need to defend ourselves, sometimes physically, more often metaphorically.

However what this system cannot abide are communities which know how to support each other. Who have enough emotional intelligence and collective networking to share the resources that are left, and refuse the capitalist conditioning to tear each other to pieces. That's what it cannot let grow, and it clumsily smashes at every opportunity, because it's an existential threat to a society founded on violence.

Figuring out not only how to attack what destroys us, but also how to grow what will sustain us, are going to be distinct yet intertwined themes of the next 20-50 years of collapse. Past then, i don't fucking know what's going to happen, or who will be around to see it.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Be careful not to go over the felony amount. Additionally, make sure your drop spot is clean of any surveillance, either from other houses/apartments/yards or from the street. If there's any chance that someone can see you take it inside, and the police can get ahold of that info, you could be fucked for serious larceny/whatever charges.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

The thing is, Chomsky is always talking about the history, which makes him a very useful introduction to anarchist ideas and the context in which we should be considering them. A lot of the things he talks about, are basically not addressed in contemporary discourse outside of him and very few other of these "public intellectuals".

However the major issue I'm raising is that he rarely takes things into a present-day context. It's easy to venerate these old guys from the anarchist canon, it's much more difficult to say, this is an anarchist project in my own area which I am invested in, and this is how I am contributing to the interrogation of my own privilege besides merely talking about it.

But that's the thing, right? He is that professional academic, and due to that socially prescribed role there's stuff he won't or can't really talk about. It always has to be alienated through the lens of history or something else that can be studied, it can never really be too close to the here and now for him. Which is why as an anarchist you can always appreciate the role he plays in the radicalization process, and what I think is his compelling (albeit a bit dry) writing about a variety of subjects, but likewise recognize that this is someone who is pretty much stuck in their own form of daily-life conservatism and isn't going to have much useful insight about how anarchism is going to work outside of this academic context.

In his best moments, like some of the statements here, he acknowledges this. But it's important to recognize that he can't move past that roadblock either.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

riseup.net has a documents service. It is plaintext format, so not as ergonomic as google drive, and it's publicly held on the internet without an account attached to it so you'd have to keep the link secret, and it'll delete after 365 days if you don't edit it at all in that time. However, it works, if you're just concerned about a plaintext

You can also upload here, under a burner account, or on this one. You can furthermore send yourself private messages on this burner account, and if you want you can later delete the DMs. That's what I would do, in a pinch. Then you just need to remember your login info, and you can access your writing wherever with nice Postmill formatting tools to use for paragraph breaks, italics, etc.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

asked if someone here is willing to get paid to help me launch an instance of raddle(.)me. I like the site's GUI and I don't have time to dick around doing sysadmin work because: A) I don't know how and B) I don't have time. Its that simple.

and yet

"But Post Your Content Here!" No. There's a bunch of opinion-based shit here and a lot of talk with zero action.

Sounds like you're the one who has a problem with acting on your plans. We have a website already, you seemingly can't get it together. Good luck with your endeavors, if you want labor done you'll simply have to ask one of your many followers instead of coming to a random outside community and begging for help, getting owned online and then whining about it in a series of hilarious posts.

This is definitely going on /f/bestof lol

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celebratedrecluse wrote

If you want to be part of Raddle, you can make a forum for your particular interests as long as you comply with the /w/terms_of_service.

If you do not want to be part of Raddle, you can still use Postmill, you just have to learn how to set up a server and run it.

If you do not want to do either, you can whine ITT i guess

"forking the instance"-- what the fuck are you talking about? Either do the work or shut the fuck up, nobody is here to do free labor for your neoliberal projects

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celebratedrecluse wrote

I am not very technically inclined, but I have an extensive research team that heavily believes in the libre movement

'having an entire technical team' ; I didn't mention anything about that. In fact, quite the opposite - I am a one-man show. If I had a technical team behind me, I would simply ask them to deploy an instance of raddle(.)me

What sort of team is this, and who are you?

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Ok, so the

deranged ex-wife

bit threw me for a loop, but perhaps there's some technical utility to what you are suggesting. However, I don't really understand what you're asking.

Ziq handles the hosting here, to my knowledge, and Postmill is open source. If you want to DM ziq about your suggestions, idk maybe they'd be open to it, but not knowing who you are & the things you mentioned about "having an entire technical team behind me" is kind of suspect to be honest so I doubt they would want to include you on the admin team or anything like that. Who knows, talk to them directly if you are trying to provide suggestions for improving the opsec though, because I'm pretty sure they're the only one who can implement them.

If you want to setup your own Postmill instance, go for it, the code is online and you can get started on your own website. Feel free to link on here, it'll either be interesting to the people on the board/comply with the /w/terms_of_service, or it won't and will either be downvoted/buried/removed. However, if you are asking someone else to do that for you, I expect that the admins here have enough on their plates already lol

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celebratedrecluse wrote (edited )

The problem is, it's impossible to find him talking directly on the subject. He's only referred to what defines "legitimate authority" a couple of times, and always in the context of a hypothetical narrative about a parent stopping their child from running into traffic.

The issue here is that, while this sounds reasonable to most people, it's exactly the same kind of narrative that authoritarian tyrants have used in a variety of contexts. Using this analogy is fraught, for it plays into a variety of politics due to its vagueness.

Chomsky has, to be fair, definitely spoken out against intellectual communities for systemic issues. However, he also has repeatedly defended the need for public intellectuals in interviews. So it is unclear what role he envisions for the professional classes in his political worldview, that would be any materially different than now, where they enjoy disproportionate power and wealth compared to vast sectors of the population-- particularly if you aren't looking just within one wealthy country.

The problem immanent with this type of politics is that anarchist syndicalism is that it is an ideology which validates workers' self organization. However, physicians and other highly paid professionals are workers-- they are also, however, managers, and this is why they are in the middle class. Being middle class isn't just about a basic level of income, which in many cases is actually falling apart; it's about a position within the economy, where you are managing people below you (students, entry level/min wage workers, children, patients) and keeping out people who are excluded altogether (the houseless, people who sell drugs or steal due to lack of "regular" income, the people who Marx would have called "lumpenproletariat").

Even high school teachers, not remunerated well in countries like the US for example, are quite literally managers of little workshops, where the product is the ideological shape of the student, along with test results and other intellectual documents. Through mandatory reporting laws, truancy laws, and other systems, the teachers are embedded as informants and police agents, with this especially obvious in the more militarized schools which are aimed to contain the children of the less wealthy.

While this is not inherent to teaching, learning, healing, or even childrearing, the idea of "justified authority" always relies on this idea of metaphorically posturing people, adults or not, as children who need to be restrained physically from running into the street. Which, I'll add that children generally do not need to be physically restrained ever, not unless there is some unusual emergency situation, and afterward it would be good consent practice to check in with the child and explain your actions, ensuring there isn't miscommunication or tension in the relationship.

Empowering the workers whose job it is to evaluate, categorize, and manage the lives of people who do not have their special status...to run society? But their only experience is in these systems of domination, all their actions will be couched in that.

Freedom doesn't follow directly from this, not without destroying the special status of those workers first, and having a cultural process of shifting the way people think about the associated activities in a more egalitarian way. But that doesn't leave room for degrees, job titles, or salaries. It would be a fundamental transformation of social relationships, class structure, and such a hand-waving easy answer as Chomsky's doesn't even come close to the nuance or explicit discussion we would need for that.

In fact, I think it veers dangerously close to reactionary whirlpools, from which a radical politics might not ever be really salvaged. The only way to find freedom from this fate is to actually discuss people, including children, in their actual contexts rather than ridiculous metaphors.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

You're right, I think that would be better and more all-encompassing too. It may also be good to have a spot in the wiki where these terms are defined as used in the document, if it does not exist already, so that there is no confusion by new users. I could get to that if it needs done

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Well, when you're looking at groups of people that are basically overflowing with frustrated white guys, you tend to get the same sort of emotive politics, because not only is there a shared sense of alienation but there's also a lot of the same positionality, blindspots, etc. Even less privileged people, when within these spaces, they adopt the dominant worldview around them-- just as most everyone does, we're social animals yadda yadda

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