Comments

2

bwqrdsaf wrote

Some stores have gotten better at hiding camera. Walmart for example, one near my took away all the black bubble camera and at a glance seems to have no camera at all but careful looking I picked up a few tiny black specks at the white ceiling that looks like small camera in white body.

If you don't see any, and the store's fairly recent or had recently remodeled, assume they hid the camera well.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

Camera, take picture if there's mirror peeping over in the fitting room, post it on social media (under different name), people will raise stink about peeping tom, and police could get involved. If they do get involved, they can strongarm the store to give up video security footage and it'd show who was peeping, and this would cause problem for the store if it was the LP that was watching suspect.

... theoretically but it will likely make things hard on the store and hopefully discourage LP from acting like peeping tom.

Another way to fight this is to have someone (friend or relative) come shopping but don't come together, pretend you don't know each other. Have the friend "shop" for clothes while watching the fitting room for the "peeping tom" and take picture if someone is snooping and have him/her post it.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

Last year at my store, all sale console were up for grab and had no security. I picked up a couple of Yoshi 2DS console for free this way and flipped them for money.

If you do steal it, don't ever return it to any store since they could track the sale by serial number and they will see it was never sold. Sell it only via private party like CL or eBay.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

$1,000 computer from Sears, this was many years ago, about the time they got together with Kmart. I just wheeled it out with an old receipt in my hand. Since their checkout desk was far from the door, they couldn't see me and it's easy for me to pretend I didn't hear them over the background noise of crying babies and quarreling couples. Since my car was parked rather far and next to a large van (lucky me), they probably assumed I drove the van and didn't see my car until I was already too far for them to get my plate. I have never heard anything from them on this computer.

3

bwqrdsaf wrote

Easy to do. Claim he stopped you and got police involved, wasted over half hour and they never found anything to support their belief you did something wrong, that the alarm beeping was probably for something you bought that the cashier screwed up.

Next time, make a stink about how your time was wasted because of incompetent cashier and power-tripping employee who depended too much on often-unreliable alarm system and will be talking with lawyer about defamation of character. You might get a free $500 gift card if you agree to not discuss this matter and not involve court system.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

If it's not on the bag, it was likely not you but the other people who walked out at the same time. There's a reason many stores do not chase after people simple from beeping towers, if more than one leaves they can't prove which one tripped the alarm. They also can't prove it went off because of stolen item, because of item that was paid for but still had live tag, because of electronic card or other devices, or simply because someone looked at the tower funny. They have to actually see someone conceal and try to leave or it could lead to embarrassing and expensive bad stop.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

it has been done, people gets the number, waits a few weeks, then use em. Extremely unethical since you're ripping off whoever buys the card, not the store. Don't do it.

-1

bwqrdsaf wrote

1: it's usually not a good idea to scam a big company like Amazon.
2: you may be able to claim a freebie just once. "Losing" a package just once can happen. Do it too many times and they will send police after you.
3: If you have security camera, "accidentally" unplug it for a day or 2 so there's no record of package delivery or "porch pirate" just in case police starts asking around about missing package.

Reply to comment by /u/Amberzey in Walk Out Target by /u/12345ChicaChica

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bwqrdsaf wrote

So walkout just once, then don't come back for many months (4-6 months would be safest). The local employee would forget you and the store's CSI-esque department would still not have enough to jump on you with felony for multiple theft.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

Most receipts has bar code that is tied to original sale record. You could try to fake receipt but they will check the bar code and see the sale record does not match or it does not scan and the number comes up invalid, they will refuse returns. Your best bet is to try and scam the store that do not use bar code on receipt to keep track of sales.

5

bwqrdsaf wrote

1: if the alarm beeps, just keep walking. Pretend you never heard it. Best if you have a phone to make it look like you're engaged in a very deep conversation and didn't hear anything.
2: if you are stopped, don't hit anyone. This will make things much worse. Drop stuff then run. Most stores in US are hands off and will give up if you run.
3: if you drive your own car, park far away so the camera can't pick up plate. Better yet, park elsewhere and use public bus.

1

bwqrdsaf wrote

Candy bars and LEGO sets at about 5 years old. Small stuff that fits in my pocket. I didn't get any of big ticket item until I was about 15 years old when I came across a badly secured portable TV. It was $250 IIRC back in the day when 2" LCD TV were new stuff and expensive as fuck.

Reply to comment by /u/DamnScalper in RFID vs AM? by /u/lift_fever

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bwqrdsaf wrote

RFID can't be changed (only deactivated) but generally scanner only looks for the bar code which are black and white stripes about 1" by 1" (2.5cm by 2.5cm) with 10, 12, or 13 numbers below it. Changing that will fool scanner but don't get too greedy like that one couple who used 29 cents notebook UPC on dozens of $25 baby formula cans.

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bwqrdsaf wrote

Generally if you don't hear a zapping sound and the alarm doesn't go off, the item you got are either not tagged at all or was a store return and previously deactivated. Those disposable tags are one time use and can't be reactivated. The exception are the permanent tags in spiderwrap and alpha cases, they can't be deactivated.

If you don't hear a zap but the alarm went off, the cashier may have not done it right or the deactivator was not working.

Reply to comment by /u/lift_fever in RFID vs AM? by /u/lift_fever

3

bwqrdsaf wrote

If the sticker tag is flat and somewhat large like about 1" around, it's probably RF. Target and Toys R Us for example uses this. If it's narrow and thick (about 1/4" wide and 1/8" thick), it's likely AM.

RFID is different and is rarely used in shoplifter prevention in USA AFAIK. Each RFID tag contains unique serial number meant to be used for inventory tracking at warehouses and factories. Stores that uses RFID for security use would have scanner at each checkout to scan the whole basket or cart and ring up total in seconds so you could simply walk through, use smart phone to pay, and leave.