blubl00d

blubl00d wrote (edited )

Jitsi Meet currently has experimental E2E encryption. From what I understand, Tox is stable, it just hasn’t been audited yet. As far as Wire goes, I’m not sure which privacy and security issues you’re referring to. The only issue I’m aware of is that Wire stores your contacts in plaintext which isn’t ideal but shouldn’t be a dealbreaker. Correct me if I’m wrong but I do not believe there are any audited alternatives to Wire other than Signal maybe which is more for personal use. Everything else is experimental.

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blubl00d OP wrote (edited )

Everything is backdoored. Really all we can do with the current technology available is to create the best bandaid solutions possible. GrapheneOS, QubesOS, etc are still bandaid solutions, albeit the best bandaids we have available. Until we reinvent hardware, firmware, software, and networking, we will always have issues with backdoors and exploits.

That’s why it’s so important for people to involve themselves in mesh networking projects and open hardware projects.

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blubl00d wrote

I don't use it either, due to the location of the servers inside USA

Signal has a feature where you’re able to verify a contacts crypto keys yourself without having to trust their servers. So long as you verify your contacts, they can’t really do anything but collect some metadata.

and the requirement for PSTN #s to register

It’s certainly unfortunate, but to be fair, Signal isn’t made to be anonymous. It’s made to replace apps like WhatsApp. If anonymity is a concern, Session uses a Signal-based protocol but utilizes onion routing to achieve anonymity.

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blubl00d wrote

Stick to the Tor Browser, don’t install any additional addons. Firefox profiles aren’t really that useful for the Tor Browser because the Tor Browser is meant to make you look like all other Tor users. Customizing it will only make you stand out.

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blubl00d wrote (edited )

Kloak for Linux and whodis for MacOS are the only tools I know of. Warning about whodis though, it’s made by a beginner programmer and still in the experimental stage as stated on their GitHub page.

You can still protect yourself from keystroke deanonymization, just type in an offline text editor such as LibreOffice Writer and copy/paste your text in the browser. It’s a little tedious but you get used to it after a while.

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blubl00d wrote

Reply to OPSEC by alexayanchenko

I’m assuming you mean just to stay anonymous on Raddle and not OPSEC in general, so here are the basics.

  • Set Tor security level to Safest.
  • Don’t log in to anything else while signed in to Raddle on the Tor Browser, create a new identity when you want to use another service. (CTRL+Shift+U)
  • Follow the Tor Project’s advice, don’t install additional add-ons on the Tor Browser.
  • Don’t give out any details about your life, who you associate with, things that might identify you, or where you may be located… this includes using an obscure username, so I hope your username is not your actual name. If it is, delete this account and create a new one when registrations are opened again.

There’s some additional info in the Privacy FAQ which might be helpful, though in my opinion it’s a little outdated and doesn’t have the best recommendations for some of the services/programs it mentions. If you want my recommendation for something just ask, but don’t blindly trust random people on the internet including me, do your own research before pulling the trigger.

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