anarcho_thembo

anarcho_thembo OP wrote

Tho this was in like the poorest areas in the city and dangerous too.

Funnily enough (it's not funny) this is also racism. The people who own the buildings in inner city/urban areas aren't the people who live there. Not only are the owners not held liable for the care of the buildings and grounds, but instead the people who live there are more frequently policed on the idea that because they don't take care of those properties (that they don't own) that they're more likely to be criminals.

AKA: Broken window policing.

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anarcho_thembo OP wrote

It's so cute when towns have sort of regimented colors that you can pick from so they're all soft and beautiful but that's also restrictive in that you can only use THOSE colors.

In America it's restrictive because generally we're not trying to make houses look beautiful, but instead uniform. In home-owners associations there are restrictions on basically how different your house is allowed to look from the others in the neighborhood and then in the most bland ways possible.

I just moved into my own little house and I'm chewing on the idea of painting it the colors of the rainbow flag just to be cheeky and because I think it would make me really happy, but I live in a VERY conservative small town so even if there's no law against it I'm pretty sure there would be consequences if I were to.

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anarcho_thembo OP wrote

HAHA my biography title: I was a 3rd Grade Anarchist.

I started by protesting by not pledging allegiance to the flag. There were some Jehovah's Witness kids in my class though so it wasn't like scandalous. But mostly it was like I didn't believe anything good that anyone said about the US. And it was that skepticism that got me here eventually.

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anarcho_thembo wrote

I wish I could remember what I read that shifted my thoughts about this, it was something when I was building a community restoration process for a housing co-op. It was a piece by a group who was doing the same work my org was doing and they had written about why they stopped considering people who perpetuate harm as "perpetrators," like people who've committed something and instead frames them as people who perpetuate harm, which is an attempt to recognize the systems that we live in as causal to the harm this person did.

We've all been enculturated in these systems of harm and community restoration is supposed to be a process to help undo that enculturation to bring the person back into community with a better understanding of the positions of privilege they hold, a greater awareness of the power that affords them, and hopefully the ability to understand the ways that they've recreated these harm cycles in their own life.

Of course Joss Whedon isn't going to do any of that. And I don't personally enjoy his work anymore, knowing what I know about him. But I don't know that we can and always should dismiss an entire person because they've been party to some horrific things. I don't know how restorative justice works then.

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anarcho_thembo wrote (edited )

Doing deep dives with regards to prison abolition and creating restorative justice systems I do a lot of thinking about "evil fucks and other assholes" and also just as an anarchist in general who quotes Proudhon despite the man being incredibly vocally antisemitic.

People fuck up real bad and it's important to hold people to account for the harm they've done. In general we need to just be clear and call out things.

I like Rancid's music. Tim Armstrong fucked a child, abused her through their marriage, and then proceeded to ruin her career in retaliation. So when people are like "yeah I love Rancid" I chime in with "oh, me too. But Tim......" and call it out.

And then I think that we need to be wary of the ways that the media that we're consuming isn't normalizing or further perpetuating harm or that if it is that we're being critical and calling out what we see when we see it.

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anarcho_thembo OP wrote (edited )

I also prefer not to think about all that! I'm mad that my brain went there because I'm still reeling where my brain keeps going about it.

Sometimes it gets fun but I remember being maybe 8 or 9 when I had my very first existential crisis when I realized that other people exist in the same way that I do only I can't actually know that because what I know is only a reflection of what my brain interprets and that also happens in dreams so I could be a dream.

I cried myself to sleep for a week about it.

I was a kid! My brain hasn't stopped since and things like this just go to such big places that I get terrified.

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anarcho_thembo OP wrote (edited )

unstoned? who dat?

So I called my friend, (who goes by Hertz, not her) and we talked about physics and how science can't answer what consciousness is because we don't even know what questions we're asking to formulate a theory that can be tested for falsification. And how what we call atoms and electrons are real in that we've built a model of what we think is going on and the math checks out sometimes but there's nothing we can point at that says "that thing."

Which got us to my question which was if we cannot currently know what constitutes consciousness that there's no way to disprove that it exists as a virtue of there being two atoms that decided to vibe in certain ways. Which creates like reality as something based on systems upon systems upon systems that are just things that decided to vibe together in certain shapes. And maybe that space between decisions - to vibe or not to vibe - is the source of freedom and that is what makes us (and oh god everything) conscious.

We ended the conversation after that somehow shifted to the ramifications of a rewards incentive system under an anarchist society and where we disagree with the results of rewards and if they create hierarchies (I say yes).

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anarcho_thembo wrote

all-too-common "I'm not a lawyer but ..." which I hear all the time.

Right but as a person who is going into legal work I am actually obligated to say that by the fact that I am not a lawyer and nothing I say should be construed as legal advice. Specifically because should my irl name get attached to something that could look like legal advice I could be charged with a felony.

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