WatchingYouConceal

WatchingYouConceal wrote

I’m a Target APTL and I can tell you they will find that spider wrap, go back and watch the video of you placing it there, then check to get your car license plate if you parked anywhere in the parking lot (Our cameras zoom all the way to the back well enough to read the plates there).

They will make a report including pictures of your face, your license plate, and exactly what happened. They will include the video footage of you stealing the device. All of this will be put in the Target computer system and possibly forwarded to the local PD.

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WatchingYouConceal wrote

Reply to by !deleted23839

As an LP, this really is a terrible story. There is no way that anyone couldn’t see you were wearing a backpack under a tight jacket. Honestly, I catch “Pro Lifters” like yourself all the time. I’m definitely sharing this laugh with some co-workers.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

  1. No, we have plenty to do besides sitting around watching video for no reason.

  2. No, there are no real signs if a camera is real or not.

  3. Most LP are dedicated to catching shoplifters, but not all are dedicated to following the rules, that’s why most LP don’t last that long. It’s hard to watch people stealing walk out the door and you can’t do anything about it because you lost sight of them for 15 seconds.

  4. I’m not sure I understand this question.

  5. Employees are supposed to report empty packages and where they were found. When we have time we will go back to the camera and watch from the point the employee found it backwards until we see someone leave it there. Then we keep a log of what they looked like and any other useful info.

  6. It’s not so much the tattoos or crazy hair, but general lack of hygiene or style that might catch my attention more. If you look poor and trashy, yeah, I will watch you, but I’ll also just as equally watch the 30 year old blonde woman who is dressed nice but has a huge purse and is checking out the makeup and perfume. Both are just as likely to steal.

  7. Fitting room concealment is the hardest because I can’t watch you. But the hardest to catch can be the ones who don’t conceal at all but only take one item and then just walk out. Because even If I were watching on camera, I wouldn’t be able to stop you by the time I realized you were walking out. If I were a shoplifter, I wouldnt conceal until the last possible moment if I concealed at all. The sooner you conceal, the more time I have to setup by the door for the stop.

  8. If you mean caught trying to conceal, but before leaving the store, the best thing you can do is drop all the merchandise and run for the door as fast as possible.

If you mean caught trying to leave the store, that depends on if the store is hands on or not.

In a hands on store, we will physically detain you whether you drop the merchandise or not. You already tried to steal and that’s enough for me to detain you and call the cops.

In a hands off store, drop the merchandise and run. A hands off employee can’t physically stop you, but they may try to step in front of you. Do NOT ever hit them or shove them because you will get the cops called and we will press charges for felony battery.

  1. LP doesn’t really have any inside secrets. Our job is simple, you try to steal and we try to stop you.
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WatchingYouConceal wrote

At my store, (Target) , we have someone there open to close, but we aren’t always watching cameras or doing floor work. We are more likely to be doing something else first thing in the morning, but sometimes we are lazy and eat breakfast and watch cameras for the first hour while it’s slow.

Every store is different and every LP is different, so it will be hard to get any kind of general scheduling information that would apply to most stores.

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WatchingYouConceal wrote

I see this attempted very rarely at Target, but it was pretty common at Walmart. People got away with it all the time because even if a normal employee sees you, they aren’t allowed to do anything about it. Only AP can do something. And if you make it to the parking lot, they will just get your license plate and turn it over to the police.

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WatchingYouConceal wrote

Anyone showing a $100k would not let just anyone try it on, nor would they take their eyes off of it for even a moment.

My wife works in a high end jewelry store. She has said people try to swap out jewelry in this industry all the time. It is very rarely ever successful because the salesperson is trained to watch for this behavior. She said this could work at somewhere like JCPenney, but you aren’t going to find anything worth much, maybe $2k-$3k max. And that’s retail. Reselling a $3k diamond ring might get $500 dollars anywhere else.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

  1. No, we didn’t have any floaters, but district managers did travel sometimes between stores.

  2. We catch lifters everywhere, but that’s because we notice them before they ever get to areas like that. Then we follow them there.

  3. I move around through the store, no particular area. It’s pretty random mostly.

  4. If I’m alone in do both floor work and camera work, but I’m rarely ever alone in my job.

  5. I notice people who dress like they are poor or women with big purses more than anyone else, but it’s honesty behavior that gets me to notice more than anything. Normal middle class looking people walk in and you can tell they are up to something. They notice everyone around them and if someone walks by the turn their head to see who it is. Things like that are reasons why the homeless looking thug walking in won’t get a second look if I’m watching the 40 year old well dressed woman in the makeup aisle who can’t stop looking around.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

Normally this is because we have video of them stealing, but we didn’t catch them in the act. This could happen for many reasons. Often times it’s a manager who sees it but can’t do anything, so they ask us to document it on the video. So we see the same person on video many times, but we don’t know who they are. But we build a case on that John Doe until we catch him one day.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

If someone is working in the clothing area they will still count items, but every store doesn’t have enough staff to keep someone there all the time.

The TSS at the front of the store does more than just check receipts, but doing that deters shoplifters. Some times we do things to deter (prevent) loss, it’s not always aimed at catching shoplifters.

You’re experience is common, but for JCP they probably violated tons of policy. They should not have stopped you from shutting your car door or gotten that close. Pulling on your purse is allowed, but that’s probably as physical as they can get. They will report the evidence and your license plate info to the police though. Dont be surprised if you get a call from a detective.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

Target has made their AP department a priority, I don’t know why. But I’m glad they do.

The best place to conceal is hard to say because every store may set their cameras up slightly different. However, we used to have an aisle that had party supplies like balloons and piñatas and they were over the aisle (you walk under them), we couldn’t see shit on that aisle. But the Bicycle rack and cereal aisle were not monitored at my store when I was there.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

The man at the door asking for your receipt was a TSS (Target Security Specialist). He is the lowest level AP team member. If you would have said “No, thank you” and kept walking he wouldn’t have done anything. Policy is to ask, but if someone refuses we let them walk. Even if he knows you didn’t pay for it, he can’t apprehend you in his own, he would have to call a higher up AP team member and by that time it would probably be too late.

If he reported that to me, which he probably would have, I would have went back on video to see if you bought the item. Upon seeing you didn’t, we would have written up a report and tried to see if your vehicle license plate was visible from the parking lot cameras. If not, we would have just kept our eye out for you again. If it was we would turn that information over to the police with the video and other evidence.

At that point they may or may not do anything about it. Depends on the police department.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

Priority is apprehending a shoplifter to prevent theft. If I can’t apprehend because of rules, my priority is to recover the merchandise anyway I can as long as I stay within the rules.

The company is ok with any kind of recovery as long as they get their stuff back.

However, most LP (including myself) enjoy apprehensions. It’s a cat and mouse game and most of the time it’s more fun to catch the mouse.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

If I understand you correctly, you took an item from the shelf and claimed it was yours already and wanted to return it. Then LP took your receipt and the item and left with it.

If that’s the case, the LP was going to go back over the video of when you entered the store to see if you entered with it. Since you did not, he will follow you on video and see you were trying to do a fraudulent return.

At this point he will be able to look up the transaction in the POS system and see how you paid. If you paid with a credit/debit card he will now have your name and photo from the surveillance cameras.

It is unlikely that he would involve the police (although he could). Most likely he will just write up a report in the computer system and send a BOLO (Be On the Look Out) for you to other Walmart’s in the area. They may contact other local stores, but that’s not really very common.

Honestly, you should probably avoid any Wal-Mart in the area for a few weeks, but after that you should be fine at any other Wal-Mart as long as you don’t do anything to draw unwanted attention to yourself from the LP.

I wouldn’t go back to the Walmart where this incident took place though for at least 3-6 months at the soonest.

If you don’t get a call or visit from the police in the next few days, I wouldn’t be worried, nothing will come of it.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

I would do what’s known as a PMR (Productive Merchandise Recovery). Basically I would stand outside the bathroom and make it obvious I am watching the suspect.

The idea is to force them to dump the merchandise. If they leave I can’t do much to stop them, but they will usually start walking back through the store leaving the merchandise on the shelves before leaving. That’s considered a success for me because I prevented a loss.

If they immediately try to leave, I’ve seen some LP make that stop. Sometimes they are right, sometimes they are wrong. It’s not a risk I’m willing to take, but others do all the time.

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WatchingYouConceal OP wrote

No problem. I feel like explaining a little about this stuff can help people not get caught and end up ruining their life over something stupid, and also may give people a second thought about shoplifting at Target stores.

But after all this if you still want to try, I’ll be there trying to catch you! Good Luck!

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