VulgarMarxist

2

VulgarMarxist wrote

What I hear from you is that you think that the US should aim to become more like where I live, Denmark, because it's "better" Capitalism, right?

You are nothing but someone with loose ideas trying to fit your ideology into Bourgeoisie politics, instead of aiming to solve the problems of the Bourgeoisie systems, you embrace them.

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VulgarMarxist wrote

Your last segment where you list the Paris Commune is literally called "***What was True Communism (or at least as close as we can get to it, obviously not perfect):"*

The Free Territories of Ukraine weren't exactly that great either. They existed only as a state in revolutionary Warfare, instead of as a revolution by themselves. The same goes for revolutionary Catalonia. Rather than being carried through Revolutions, these two examples came from warfare, and were upheld by warfare. Not by revolutionary vigor. Oppertunism was what it was, nothing more.

I'll repeat myself. Communism is not a thing that "happens". It is not a state of affairs. To claim so is useless Utopianist drivels.

**"**Es macht ihn ein Geschwätz nicht satt,

das schafft kein Essen her."

Chomsky is overrated. There are plenty of earlier critiques of Capitalism that make the same points as him, the only difference being that Chomsky just happened to be the right place at the right time. There is a reason why we don't hear about him here in Europe, because all of his points were made by figure back when he was a kid, or even before he was born. Chomsky is only regurgitating old Socialist thought to young ears. His intellectual value is questionable at best, considering that his audience isn't the workers, but mostly students, who then continue to take their education, and at best themselves become armchair anarchists, leaving behind their activism when they leave their education.

I only now started on a University education, after getting a traditional labour job at a brewery right out of my Gymnasiumial education, and I see this all around me. Plenty of fired up ideologues, but no activists. They come out for May Day and that's it. They join Yellow Unions, and say "it's the same". They praise the Liberal turns in the Social Democratic party, saying that it "at least still helps the workers".

Calling Chomsky the most Prominent Libertarian Socialist of the 20th century is a direct insult to people like Luxemburg, Korsch, Reich, Rühle, Durruti, Hoffmann, Debord, and many others far more prominent thinkers. Hell, I wouldn't even consider Chomsky the most prominent American Libertarian Socialist of the 20th century, when you also have figures like Mattick, Day, Boggs, Thomson, and Bookchin.

Chomsky was only lucky to be picked out by the media. He is nothing more than a lucky face among many possible. To claim that Chomsky hasn't been given opportunities is wrong as well. He has been literally spoon fed from the day he was born. He has had plenty of time to throw himself into active Labour party politics. Instead he has placed himself in his aforementioned glass castle, and plays "the perfect theoretician".

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VulgarMarxist wrote

The Paris Commune wasn't true Communism. At least not by any Marxist interpretation of the word "Communism". Rather, it was an example of what the Revolutionary Dictatorship of the Proletariat could look like. Marx at least described it as such in his(& Engels') work about the 1871 civil war in France.

Communism isn't a state of affair to which reality will have to adjust itself. Communism isn't a set of policies to be implemented. Communism isn't a "right/wrong" thing. Communism is the movement to abolish the present state of things, meaning the Capitalist/Liberal/Bourgeoisie/Whateverothernamesithas mode of production, to give rise to the next mode of production, which would be the Socialist mode of production,

Also: Chomsky is a US college Commie with no ties to any Labourers, sitting in his glass castle in MIT, and while he raises some legitimate critiques of Capitalism, his ideas are inherently flawed, in that he doesn't actually offer solutions, nor does he actively aim to help the working class.