Tequila_Wolf

Tequila_Wolf wrote

Got some work done for my official life for the first time in a long time, which is a spark of hope that my life won't plummet into new levels of hard.

And I'm still managing to get a lot done. It might be that when things are hardest I work the most, because most I'm aware then that things could be so much worse.

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

I thought that there was a very good conversation about this (in particular with regards to the killing of Mussolini) in this podcast including one of the co-writers of the crimethInc piece linked there too. Don't have time to rehash it now but for me it's one of the best podcast episodes I've listened to so I'd recommend it, probably after reading the original piece.

2

Reply to by !deleted18811

Tequila_Wolf wrote

A person has nothing to hide while advancing the cause of Anarchism.

Well, turns out a handful of anarchists are chilled with pedophilia, so I'm skeptical of that.

That aside, anarchists are killed and tortured for being anarchists often, so there is a lot of reason to be careful about how you present yourself.

It is best to be clear when making a political argument.

I think this is incredibly hard if your anarchism is based in a metaphysics of difference, or accounts for unconscious drives. Trying to make something clear without the prerequisite perspectival shift is tough, and in my experience, there's a huge perspectival shift that comes with anarchism. In the beginning (like many of us) I listened to people like Chomsky make clear kinds of arguments and say straightforward things. Understanding Deleuze took months and years of piecing things together because it is in a sense unclear.

Finally, a point on irony. There are good uses for irony; those statements that have an ostensible meaning but come with reason for you to not accept that meaning. Where this irony sets you in motion to seek out the 'real meaning' of the statement, you are given the opportunity to arrive at new information on your own, instead of simply being given the information, which you may not have been ready for that way.

And fiction, and literary/dramatic techniques in general. They are forms that make up the content of any work.

Theatre of the oppressed, for example, just gives you a bunch of scenarios to act out, then asks you to piece together its meaning, from the positionalities you've been asked to act out. This is a really great way of expressing ideas across in a non-authoritarian way - simply allowing a person to arrive at whatever conclusion they arrive at.

6

Reply to by !deleted18811

Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

I've never met anybody who uses pronouns other than he/she/they.

I feel good about 'they', thank fuck. Reading this post has made me think about how much harder other pronouns would be. Already I struggle with 'they'.

But I'm also realising that if I lived in a world where it wasn't so brutally hard just to have they pronouns I would likely have been a person who considered other ones. Really they're just unthinkable in my present world. Like so much trans exploration I would potentially like to do. And that's fucked.

I like how I got to think about something different with this question. Thanks.

4

Reply to by !deleted18811

Tequila_Wolf wrote

If I'm really trying to be as specific as I can with as little language, I just say anti-authoritarian.

2

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'm curious about how you'd get the money out if you can talk about it.

Meaning, if you get a bank loan, they will send it to your fake bank account, I assume. So is your plan to draw the money from an ATM? Or send it to another account that is then somehow untraceable? Or?

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'm not a fan of this approach for some of the reasons outlined here, but I wanted to point out that one of the chants at french yellow vest protest is directed at cops: "Kill yourselves!", together with a lot of antagonism, means cops are 36 times more likely to kill themselves there right now.

Stim talks about it in the most recent episode.

3