Syzygy

Syzygy wrote

Adorno is someone that immediately comes to mind. I've read a few of his works and I don't think a single line has really illuminated anything that wasn't already recognizable from my lived experiences and observations and there's certainly nothing in his writings that got me fired up to make some changes in my life. A lot of reading theory has been like that though, just walking away from a book only gaining insight to the author's thinky-thoughts that aren't even fun for me to think about. Most of Marxist writings have had that effect on me, but I don't want to say I regret reading them as I still like being able to have a clear understanding of why I reject certain notions, but I certainly could have read less from those crowds.

I certainly regret reading Laurance Labadie as well. I feel like I got duped by the title "Anarcho-Pessimism." I'm pretty sure he mostly talked about how free markets would be a solve-all antidote a la libertarianism and only got a lil misanthropic toward the end of the collection. Wasn't a line worth reading that I can recall.

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Syzygy wrote

I'm not terribly into games, but The Stanley Parable, The Beginner's Guide, Tacoma, and Grim Fandango come to mind. But, yeah. Games have been rather neglectful of storytelling throughout the years. It seems that at least with it being easier and cheaper for others to make games there are at least people out there focusing on the narrative than solely just gameplay.

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Syzygy wrote

Reply to Urusei Yatsura OP by ryu

The 2nd and 4th Urusei Yatsura films are so good. Definitely recommend it to anyone who hasn't seen them yet. You don't need to see any of the TV series or previous films to enjoy them either (though I really love those as well). The only background info is some of the character personalities and relationships, but those are easy to pick up on.

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Syzygy wrote

Am I ready? Sure. I've mentally prepared myself that death, imprisonment, and punishment are very real consequences I could face for some of the things I have done, still do, and would do. However, I don't want to die, be imprisoned or punished so I take precautions in what I do so it never happens. I'm not trying to be a martyr for "the cause" and I'm only going to give as much as I feel comfortable giving. Some people do more and others do less. I'm not terribly concerned with it. I feel that I live(d) authentically to myself and the values I hold.

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Syzygy wrote

Reply to High school by Morninglor

If the school has a music program, musical instruments could get you $$$. Most will have serial numbers marked right into the instrument or have other markings connected with the school, but lots of instruments are sold online so it would also be rather easy to sell it and get it out of your area without drawing any attention to yourself and have it trace back to you. Students who leave their personal instruments at school will be less traceable, but I'd probably ignore those and just focus on the school's instruments. At least when I was in HS band, we had a room full of extra instruments that literally just sat in their cases because we didn't have enough members and most had personal instruments.

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Syzygy wrote

Reply to by DeletedButArchived

Yes, I do hate going to work. Beyond that though I also hate being a customer. Certainly because of some of the reasons you mentioned, but also because I'm just not that into food so I'm fine cooking up simple meals at home for way cheaper for the rest of my life, really.

Some people are really into exploring different foods or whatever and the service aspect is just something that's part of getting the food and that's fine, but some people certainly relish the fact of having some one wait on them. It's infuriating how dehumanizing some customers can be. People really start thinking they're something special because they're throwing a little money around and expect to be treated as superior. There's probably something about class, the spectacle, and all that, but I don't know how to expand on that. There's also an element of socialization tied into dining and there's probably something more about the spectacle and commodifying every aspect of everyday life so even people getting together is often centered around spending money. IDK. Restaurants are wack, but seem to be more of "the symptom not the disease" to me.

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Syzygy wrote

I haven't read the entirety of ziq's essay (and probably won't), but I really don't see the issue here - much less with it being "bad" philosophy. There isn't some inarguable distinction between morality and ethics. Shit, in university I had philosophy professors assert there isn't one at all. Because these terms lack a widely recognized distinction, we're free to attempt defining them ourselves, even if we're mere "laypeople" as that one commenter asserted.

The vast majority of contemporary philosophy relies too much on rehashing old interpretations of the canon. It's so fucking boring. Most writings that garner the label of being "bad philosophy" seem to be attempts at actually trying to communicate something new, even if it is only new to the writer. Like, actually philosophizing. IMO that's way better than trying to find a link between Kant's synthetic a priori intuitions and Sartre's nothingness or whatever grad students do.

That said, there might be some link to force between ziq's essay and Stirner. On p.80 of Stirner's Critics, Stirner writes:

[Egoism] doesn't exclude any interest. It is directed against only disinterestedness and the uninteresting; not against love, but against sacred love, not against thought, but against sacred thought, not against socialists, but against sacred socialists, etc.

So if morality and ethics are both attempts to define what one finds right or wrong, in ziq's view, morality would be sacred while ethics are not. Which is perfectly inline with egoist thought and other lines that stem from or are related to it such as post-left politics. I'm sure there's more, but I don't feel like reading or writing much more about this. Is this a fair assessment of your essay ziq?

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Syzygy wrote

Been feeling real lonely lately and a foray back into online dating certainly has not helped. IDK how, but I need to learn how to meet new people outside of an app. I'm a rather awkward and shy person, but at least IRL I can express myself somewhat well, whereas in messaging I just seem so boring and I have no idea how to even begin a conversation in that sphere so I usually don't get around to meeting the people I'm matching with. Sacrificing the security of isolation takes a lot of effort from me, but... I can't keep feeling this way. I think there's some casual bike ride groups in my area so I'll probably start attending those...

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Syzygy wrote

Love dälek. Lots of great lyrics throughout their discography. A personal fav of mine is from Hold Tight:

Misunderstood, misguided maniac

Lacking social skills and will to fit your mold

I told your kind before not to expect the world

From I who hates the world

I'll burn your flag unfurled

Propel my anger past rage

What you thought was phase is the air to my everyday

I raise a fist against your rusty cannons

Abandon my every shred of decency

Devise plan to topple politician in vicinity

Your ideas of liberty, archaic

You took freedom and enslaved it

I don't portray the role of revolutionary

Just slice the jugular of society on a Tuesday

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Syzygy wrote

Maybe it's more paranormal or supernatural than spiritual, but I'll try to describe it.

I've always believed in ghosts, but my falling out of religious beliefs made it difficult to explain how they could exist without any concept of an afterlife. But I came across a concept in Fernando Pessoa's writings that helped reconcile it for me. I can't articulate it well, but the idea is that there are differing levels of individual reality that exist on the same plane of reality. So living people are the most real, but ghosts or spirits or whatever that one can attempt communication with are real too, they just have less reality - making it more difficult for us to interact with each other, though it isn't impossible.

I have a "Law Keep Away" prayer candle that I light occasionally and usually request assistance from those that lived freely to aid me in living freely as well. Maybe it's just superstition to keep my nerves somewhat at bay before I go out tagging or whatever, but it feels right to do and I feel like I'm in touch with an ongoing community of people that have tried to live their lives, of continuing the efforts they put in however long ago. There aren't any specific spirits of people I have in mind when I talk to the candle, just the totality of spirits of those that lived freely. It isn't anything that occupies my thought in most of my daily shit or really directs my behaviors, but it's a little something I have in my life.

I never got into Cro-Mags, but that vid of John Joseph explaining his training and diet for the iron-man challenge is really rad. There's a part in that video where he details how although cooking healthy meals takes a lot of time, people who don't might end up having to spend that time instead waiting in doctor's offices. And I really like the idea of essentially taking the same time, but using it in a more desirable manner. Like, sure, I could get to places faster if I had a car, but then I'd miss out on all the reading I've done on the train or enjoying the weather on a bike or seeing stuff written on walls when walking around and instead have to find parking and stand there filling up the tank, etc. Not really related to your initial question, but yeah he's certainly inspiring.

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Syzygy wrote

Not very. I've asked my mother about what she knows and have some knowledge about what led to the place I was born, where others came from etc. but I don't really feel any connection with those places or people (living or deceased). It's just an amusing story I was told once and that will conclude with me.

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Syzygy wrote

Reply to "Rulerless" my ass by ziq

"Calls for submissions" are always strange to me - especially with the relative ease of publishing stuff online. It always feels like someone who wants to "contribute" but has nothing themselves to contribute.

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Syzygy wrote

Reply to by !deleted32308

The Story of Mary MacLane by Mary MacLane and Malina by Ingeborg Bachmann.

MacLane is decent, though I likely wouldn't read it again. She's more interesting to read about than read in my opinion. I really like Malina. Bachmann does a lot of really interesting things with language and her style of writing. I'm only halfway through so I can't really summarize it well, but it's good literary fiction. I also liked this piece of information from the introductory essay by Rachel Kushner:

What drove Bachmann’s writing, she told an interviewer just before she died, was an unshakable belief in a utopia she knew would never come about.

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Syzygy wrote

As others mentioned, wheatpasting is probably an ideal method since it's fast, easy, and can convey more information than a tag. I've used this recipe and it didn't give me any troubles. I'd also recommend using a satchel or messenger bag or any bag that rests at your side over a backpack as it's way more inconspicuous to pull stuff from there than having to whip around a backpack.

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