SomeIconoclast

SomeIconoclast wrote (edited )

When American consumer culture isn't about fucking over the poor and brown people, it's about saying that we make things taste like other things when we just change the look of the box and literally nothing else.

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SomeIconoclast wrote (edited )

All being "American" means to me is that my mother gave birth to me within the imaginary lines that are designated as the United States. I have no attachment to the culture; own no land; and I'm descended from slaves, immigrants, and whatever Puerto Ricans are to the US government.

I'll stop here before I start ranting about how nonsensical the concept of nationality is.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

Look, this might be hard to understand, but I swear to Galt that this is the most efficient system for resource allocation and distribution. This is Clearly a case of crony Capitalism; this totally wouldn't happen if the state would stop regulating the infinite wisdom of the free market.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I won't bullshit you; I honestly don't think anarchism would be feasible in my lifetime. And I believe that things will get much worse before they get better. But what exactly does that do for me? Do I conform to the politics of everyone else? Fuck no, because I know too much about how authority works; I'd fucking lose it. Do I just allow myself to be swallowed by pessimism and seethe in my own anger until I hate myself and everyone around me because I see myself and others as complicit in our shared oppression? I've done that; it's availed me nothing, it doesn't solve anything and it certainly doesn't make me feel good. What's left for you to do then other than defiance?

I can't take much risks against authority since the costs for me will be too great.

You're far from the only one, people don't want to die and no one wants to go to prison. US anarchists are fucking trash (myself included), but the fact that our heavily militarized police force would gleefully gun us down to the thunderous cheers and applause of just about everyone else is about as close to a decent defense of our comparative docility as you can get. People have lives, loved ones, and responsibilities and to toss those away to become martyrs to a cause, however noble, is antithetical to anarchism. Besides, outright defiance isn't the only way to advance anarchism and you're just one person. You can't save everyone and you have to acknowledge that you can't truly liberate anyone, that's something that they have to choose for themselves. Do what you can when you can and try your hardest to extract some form of joy out of life.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I'm transferring schools; going to one that's closer to home. It'll come with a whole new set of challenges that I would have had to face anyway, but at least I'll be around a group of people that I'm actually fond of. Last semester, two of these guys kept me up for around 2 hours because they kept talking about about trans people being mentally ill and these walls are thin. The casual homophobia and ableism soured whatever impressions I initially had of them, too.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

How long did they cover the Texas guy shooting cops? But how long do they cover cops who shoot innocent people?

I honestly have no idea; reading news that involves killer cops is depressing and when the victim has a criminal record, it becomes outright infuriating because it's almost always brought up as if it's relevant or somehow justifies whatever happened.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

The whole "Thoughts & Prayers" thing is actually kind of interesting. Don't get me wrong, it is absolutely just an empty platitude that politicians use to declare that they'll pretend to give a shit about something for maybe all of 5 seconds; but it's also weirdly effective at displaying what issues they'll pretend to give a shit about. For instance, I've never heard anyone send out "Thoughts & Prayers" for dead sex workers, prisoners, trans people, or black people; but I have heard politicians use similar platitudes towards veterans, soldiers, and the victims of (non-white) terrorism.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I don't think so (granted, I'm gen z; so I might be biased); personally, whenever I think of people categorized by generations, I think of white people. I'm aware that boomers, gen x, and gen z people of color exist, but I don't really categorize people of color by age: it feels superfluous. Boomer (and by extension, other generational labels) seem to almost always refer to sub-groups of well off white folks.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

It's an intellectually lazy dismissal typically spouted off by people who mistake their own ignorance for wisdom. It falls apart under moderate scrutiny, doesn't actually address any problems that would arise under anarchy, and usually when people say a political system doesn't "work" they fail to take external factors into account: for example; any attempt at anarchy, communism, or socialism that is quashed by a more powerful capitalist state is typically dismissed as having fallen apart when they were actually foiled.

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I agree. Children aren't people, nor do they deserve autonomy because they haven't lived that long. My kids would eat cake for dinner everyday because they're children, not because I've had to make them eat foods that they didn't like. In conclusion, children are property, not people; disagreeing with this means that you're irrational. Noam, tell me it's my academia given right to pull my wretched spawnling from traffic!

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Reply to comment by SomeIconoclast in Complete anarchy my ass by ziq

SomeIconoclast wrote

and no, african kids in mines do not die to please the american middle class, they die to please the global rich. something you dont understand because your mind is fixated on nationalities and other spooks.

i have a migraine

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SomeIconoclast wrote

Stuck in my dorm doing nothing; stuck in the bizarre, hellish position of having a shit load of time, but am otherwise prevented from spending it the way that I'd want to. You know, the usual.

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Reply to comment by SomeIconoclast in Friday Free Talk by vMU9

SomeIconoclast wrote

Mm...hard to say, honestly; I personally liked it, though I definitely feel like I didn't get too much from it; there wasn't anything particularly new to me, but Bonanno was able to give voice to a few ideas that I knew I had but couldn't really express. If you have an interest in Insurrectionary Anarchism, it's as good a place to start as any; at a whopping 30 pages, you should be able to finish it in a few hours at most. If you're not into Insurrectionary Anarchism (or critiques of organization and/or work) for whatever reason, you probably wouldn't care for it. I'm not too sure what others would find "good", so I can only give you a basic overview of what I thought and the contents of the book.

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Reply to Friday Free Talk by vMU9

SomeIconoclast wrote

I finally read Armed Joy; thus making the teeniest tiniest dent in the list of anarchist writings I have on queue. Maybe I'll be able to read two more by next year.

It's looking like I'll have to get a job soon since my mom is single again and she needs a new place to live.

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