RosaReborn

9

RosaReborn wrote

I think of the brave anarchists of previous times and their actions during times which comparably to today were much more sustainable (if socially more repressed) and think how much could they take today before starting a revolution.

There are people today carrying on the struggle, but I just think, how would the ones who attacked the established past react and work to overthrow what we have in the present

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RosaReborn wrote

Lesser-of-two-evils but still upholding the social order social democrat, always anti-capitalist. This led to a bit of statist communism, believing that the mechanisms of the state could be used to crush capital and allow for representative communalism (always aware of the failures of past states but thinking we could learn from it, turns out what we learn from it is that the state is incentivized to never let go of power and that oppressive systems extend far beyond just defeating capital but also altering our fundamental interactions with each other and the environment).

I guess this led to a kind of eco-anarchosyndicalism, with an emphasis on communal cooperation. Looking further into colonialism and individualism I now consider myself an anarchist without other labels because my focus is on a total shift in nearly all aspects of life, which is what anarchy means to me.

Reply to comment by /u/nbdy in Friday Free Talk by /u/ThreadBot

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RosaReborn wrote

That's great you're reaching out and I hope it goes well.

Meeting people politically is nice but I know what you mean by meeting mostly tankies. It seems anarchists with good politics are difficult to get to gather regularly, perhaps because they tend to be diverse in thought and not as easily categorize-able as tankies whose goals largely consist of resuscitating a collapsed society that they need to ignore 80% of info about to maintain its credibility.

I know gardening and table-top gaming can be great communities as well to meet people who are empathetic and endearing, at least in my experience.

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RosaReborn wrote

Which is more important to you, libertarianism or socialism?

I don't think the two are really separable. How can you empower and free a community without empowering the individual? How can an individual be free without equality and support in the community?

if you had to choose between "libertarian unity" with capitalists or "left unity" with tankies, which would it be?

I wouldn't choose either but since I have to I think I would actually go authoritarian left because many people in that group want the same goals and have similar analysis of the world but just haven't delved deep enough into the core of their own philosophy to appreciate that contradiction of a state power structure ever working to dissolve itself. I used to believe that a state could enable communism, now I feel firmly that that is a contradiction but the change in my views just required a deeper look at what I really wanted, a true revolution that abolishes the pyramid of power and not just rearrange the seats, even if those in the AL can't see that.

'libertarian' right is just too insufferable to me but I'm sure many allies have come from that group just like some allies used to be tankies.

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RosaReborn wrote

I'm not up on the stats but isn't it like over 50% of citizens don't vote? Clearly there is a huge untapped share of possible voters outside of the bourgeois 'center.' Compromising with political opponents at behest of your mutual donors is what disinsentivizes voters.

Anyways we should Eat the Dems

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RosaReborn wrote

A nice overview of the core problems he has in his world-view and how contradictory he can be. Not much on his complete lack of understanding of what 'post-modernism' or 'Marxism' even means but plenty of talk about him reinforcing hierarchy, particularly capitalist and patriarchal.

These quotes summarize:

To seek out responsibility and meaning in the face of suffering and to fight against the forces that perpetuate one’s suffering is both empowering and perhaps a more rational course of action given one’s own beliefs of what the world should look like. However, Peterson draws an arbitrary line between individuals who pull themselves up by their proverbial bootstraps within the confines of the status quo and activists who seek to alter or dismantle it altogether, revealing a deep-seated political bias that belies a consistent application of his own message. Peterson focuses on the erosion of the male archetype as a model of meaning for all men (a doubtful prospect) while ignoring the structural conditions that cause many individuals, including men, to suffer from an utter lack of agency and self-determination.

Telling people they should take responsibility for their own lives is great advice; however, I have a different interpretation of this platitude, to me it means wresting back control over our own lives from the bureaucrats, politicians and corporations that dominate society, it means seizing land and capital and pushing the state out of our spaces so we can build a new base for a decentralized society where the individual can freely make decisions without having to appeal to rulers and bosses.

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RosaReborn wrote (edited )

Great. I was never very involved in school organizations so take my advice with a grain of salt but my two ideas for the school uniform are: 1) Organize a boycott type of thing, get everyone to start a hashtag on social media with something like #NoUniformNovember #28/11/2018 or whatever date you want and encourage the whole school to not wear a uniform. If everyone in the group does it, it may spread to others. 2) Start a petition, focus on getting a lot of faculty to sign on a special faculty list.

Additionally at group meetings, you can push some Leftist education about how uniforms are used to control women, as well as limit LGBTQ+ expression, as well as target minorities [PDF]

I haven't read all of the second link but one interesting fact from page 5

In 1996, approximately three percent of all schools in the United States had a school uniform policy (Gentile & Imberman, 2009). This number grew to 21% in the year 2000

Shows how recent the uniform trend is and how it isn't really tradition or anything

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RosaReborn wrote

Perhaps you could try to get meetings started during your lunch break. Getting group support before starting after school meetings can go a long way. I like your approach of school-related topics. You can call your group 'X'JHS Action Front or something, with X being your school name.

The canteens is an issue that'll have to be done at the school board level so I would focus on the other two issues in your first meeting, as they'll be easier, and establish a meeting time.

Also with school events, I found bringing homemade brownies or something helps with turnout, advertise sweets and they come flocking. Seems kinda cheap but it works.

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RosaReborn wrote

Can't believe this was on r/COMPLETEANARCHY, or maybe I can.

Either way, anti-zionism =/= anti-judaism and any implication of such is disgusting imperialism justification

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RosaReborn wrote

Leftist is bestist but the core of that is abolishing unjustifiable hierarchy and oppression. Why distinguish between communism and anarchism? If there are certain methods you prefer, like syndicalism or what-not that's up to you, but the core of equality is always key

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RosaReborn wrote

sacrifice your own privilege in order to fully combat oppression and make a real change in the world. And if you’re not willing to do that, fuck you then.

Absolutely. Only a revolution can make things better, but those in comfort will certainly loose that comfort and that is the biggest obstacle to mobilize. The tough thing is people may not know until the time comes what they are really willing to give away and what they will embrace to abolish society