OlSparkey

OlSparkey wrote

Reply to save the planet by ziq

Plastic recycling isn't often performed even on recyclables. Its usually burned for heat since it is often high yield and pre-cleaned by people who imagine it will be used to make more packaging.

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OlSparkey wrote

I sometimes talk about the concept of reverse gentrification as a result of the internet and the lack of value provided by cities as a means for rapid information dissemination. I have since learned that this is better known as disinvestment, and the coming collapse of commercial mortgage backed securities may be a result. When you hear a CEO pushing people back into the office, it's because the shareholders of the shareholders fear the bust of their key assets (downtown real estate). As long as people continue avoid working downtown it could happen and would likely benefit everyone but the richest few

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OlSparkey wrote

I have to admit that I am stoked to see Russian oil oligarchs and military generals being assassinated while conscripts are being given a new life with freedoms and luxuries they never even knew existed. It seems like it is going poorly for the Russian state but might end up being good for the Russian people. Just imagine if Cheney or other unknown shadow actors had been assassinated at the start of the Iraq war how much less likely Western leaders would have been to push for further aggressions in pursuit of personal wealth gain.

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OlSparkey wrote

I have bought untreated grain suitable for human consumption directly from an agricultural seed supplier for $12 per 50lb. Also I have seen bags of rolled oats of 25lb weight for $25 at a wholesaler.

I try to buy from the people who buy from the farmers, at least in rural Canada. At least some organizations, if not all based on regulations maintain physical storage conditions that obviate the need for chemical solutions.

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OlSparkey wrote

I suspect the crypto carbon footprint is lower than the footprint of the central banks. Just consider how much of the worlds wealth is based in finance and the sort of stuff the ultra rich spend their money on.

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OlSparkey wrote (edited )

Potatoes and kale are northern staples and both are easy. Winter squash like kabocha or buttercup. String beans, carrots, radish. People grow incredible gardens in the far north, the long summer days can help crops to grow faster, and the higher moisture typical of northern climates often doesn't hurt. Most berry bushes like blackberry, elderberry, service berry, raspberry will all do well. But all of these crops do best when they have lots of food/compost. I suggest checking out a YouTube channel of someone homesteading near you. Often there are subtleties of an environment that go beyond latitude. Soil type, rainfall, proximity to environmental features impacting microclimate. If you are interested in a great book there is one that is written by a famous CBC garden expert I could link you. It is written in a monthly format so you know what you should be doing in any given month. Also, chickens have so many benefits. Good luck and happy shovel-work. P.s. garden work is a gateway drug to masonry, and masons are always free

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OlSparkey wrote

I think this sort of land is the type that would benefit most from the drawdown concept of recarbonization of the soil using migrant herds of grazing animals. Seems like a massive misplay by debeers for blocking the local farmers from using the land, unless they are afraid of something entering human food supply that shouldn't (which makes some sense given the phytoremediation concept).

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OlSparkey wrote

Reply to by !deleted8445

What are people saying about drawdown, and the value of traditional pasturing of animals in the context of soil carbon capture. I thought this was a legitimate solution: i.e. not all meat is bad

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OlSparkey wrote

This isn't exactly what I was getting at. More like, there are xxb/trillion dollars per year that goes into currency management. All that money is spent by people on stuff and all that stuff has a cost in terms of emissions. So you need to compare that carbon cost to the carbon cost of bitcoin and then you start to have a rational argument against bitcoin on an emissions basis. This title is all smoke and mirrors - it seems to provide a rational position against bitcoin, but it does not.

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OlSparkey wrote

I think this this is a misleading title. The vaccine was paid for in advance, largely, although often tied to clinical success. Its not like there is a shelf of vaccine somewhere awaiting high bidders. The delivery times of 12 months for clinical evaluation and 18 months for global scale aren't just good - they are nearly unbelievable given the contemporary history of vaccine development. The vaccine is rolling off the line and going to whoever ordered it first last fall, or in some cases, last winter.

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OlSparkey wrote

While that's true, I think we are well aware that the vulnerabilities installed by national security agents are the targets of malicious non-state associated actors, including those who are fundamental privacy advocates. Consider when the big equation group story came out. At that time most of the vulnerabilities being released were still actual live 0 day exploits. I think it came to public eye partly because of "Da Flame" being identified during the Iranian centrifuge attacks documented in 2012.

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OlSparkey wrote

I am unsure if the vaccine companies are truly "hiding the recipe." Consider this:

https://aiche.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/amp2.10060

Its more like academics saying how to do it as cheap and accessibly as possible. All the spike protein sequencing is done relatively publicly so the new variants aren't "private info." Even the detailed design of the saRNA vaccine development associated with the above link is public knowledge. Or at least if you can access the literature through a public library license or scihub. I am of the opinion that politicians who are pressuring the system to implement changes to reduce freedom of access to literature, etc., may be the best place to focus the attention of those able and willing to protest for change given an objective of rapid development of rapid responses to vaccines. Also continued support of GAVI, COVAX, and small platform technology development organizations

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OlSparkey wrote

I have wondered if my own interests in such things are as well intentioned as they were when I was in my 20's. I found as I grew older I began to desire comfort and long term economic security. I am not an anarchist, sadly. Although I do think decentralization of power is a critical and achievable objective for humanity, so therefore I must not be totalitarian. Altogether I have mixed feelings on this comment as it seems to make a claim that is absolute and therefore, in some ways, is totalitarian in itself. I think the fundamentals of fighting totalitarian thinking are personal freedom, privacy and access to information.

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OlSparkey wrote

Great story. Definitely sparked an important movement. Still, I have to disagree with his decision to put his scales on a box. Anyone know the math? I suspect this would work against him making his items seem like less...

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