Majrelende

Majrelende wrote

Reply to by !deleted13038

I think it can certainly be very healing to be with other forms of life; for me there is a realness and joy to them that tends not to be present with other humans, usually. But you may not have to go headfirst into a natural place with little experience. Maybe first, find a packet of vegetable seeds, perhaps a radish or some other fast growing plant, and sow a few, somewhere where you will see them grow. I have had great joy this summer watching five or so squash plants, each growing in every direction at such a speed that the fences need to be moved every week. Also, perhaps learn the weeds and wild plants so that you can greet them whenever you pass by. Or find their names yourself.

First generation self-sufficiency is a slow process though, which requires quite a bit of experience, as I have learned. (Experience I don't have yet.) For instance, before I would never have thought to boil any food except pasta or soup, but when I read a bit in a book about boiling greens into a porridge, I tried and it was delicious-- it helped to even out the bitter garlic mustard and cress flavours while making the milkweeds and nettles more tender, and didn't sacrifice nutrients. And I have yet to grow more than a handful or two of grain. But it is possible; everyone's ancestors lived naturally for uncountable generations, and everyone's descendants will have to for hopefully at least as long. Be ambitious but cautious, I think.

I hope I didn't come off as condescending here; I thought it important to share what experiences I could. But tell me if I was.

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Majrelende wrote

Reply to comment by 86944 in Friday Free Talk 11/6/21 by black_fox

I planted some potatoes earlier this spring, just making openings in the sod and dropping a small potato in each one; as far as I can tell, they are all alive, and the ones from last year have been expanding.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

That allowing the free continuation of life is better than destroying the world and plunging countless beings into suffering to give luxury to a small percent of humans.

Aside from that, I feel that my anarchism has ceased to be a logic and has become more of an instinct, and is expansive in ways that cannot be explained. This may have been a cause of my long period of inactivity on Raddle.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

Reply to comment by Ashy in Is there a name for my fear? by Ashy

About politophobia, I made it up. I may not be good with making up English words, so if something seems wrong, feel free anyone to correct it.

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Majrelende wrote

Apparently there are no accepted words for city-fear. Maybe Politophobia?

I have a kind of reaction to being in cities too, although it is far less pronounced and maybe of a different cause; it is more a feeling of unease. I know that there is a change that comes over the mind going into a city. For me it is a feeling of floating, like the soil and stone of existence are gone and the only things left are symbols and images, that pull the mind apart. The wild life that I usually see is gone, and that life is real, and I am accustomed to that life; in a city I find it is replaced with an assertive, symbolic capitalist emptiness.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

Anthropophobia sounds like fear of humans/social interaction as opposed to cities, and I think MeowyAsh isn't referring exactly to being with people. So maybe enochlophobia would better encapsulate what you were trying to say there, too.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

Brick caps are some of my favourite mushrooms, and they like to fruit in cold weather. I have not managed to grow any, though, just foraged, but I was able to mycelium from the rotted wood around the stem bases. They died after a little while, though; I think they were bored with cardboard.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

A little tangent: I am getting somewhere on the road to fluency in my invented language, but speaking English in everyday life slows my sentence formation in Nameless-speech— that language is much more verb-heavy and agglutinative, and there are none of the clichés that English has. To call trees “it” feels more and more discomforting after the third-person pronouns for humans and trees in the language are one. I begin to think, maybe English can be reformed, but why bother? I rather prefer the new language.

Aside from that, I speak a bit of Spanish and I probably would speak more Norwegian than that if I bothered to practice. If I really wanted to, I think I have the capacity for more, although not the motivation. No one speaks it, and I have grown more and more to use electronics only when I need to.

I have also dabbled in other languages: I probably can recite the numbers from one to ten in Nepali, and maybe a sentence or two, on a good day.

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Majrelende wrote

Some kind of gardening and untying yourself from the capitalist system is probably one of the more accessible things— that is most of what I am doing myself— even just learning about making clothes or woodworking— but it would probably be a good idea to be more vague about your location, like “close to a large city”. I am not sure who might be able to determine your location from a post like this, but caution seems applicable.

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