Loundrel

Loundrel wrote (edited )

Reply to Talk Me Down by angoraboi

Getting caught is scary as hell, but it's not as bad as they make it seem. The entire goal of the people who caught you is to scare you into not doing it again. Taking legal action against you would cost them money, way more than $30, so it's not worth it for them to do anything more than try to scare you and make you feel guilty.

I've never been caught at Wally, but I have been caught at Hole Phoods, twice (out of the probably over 100 times I actually lifted from them). Both times, I was caught with over $100 worth of stuff, but never had to go to jail and never got more than a misdemeanor.

First off, since no cops were called, you have no legal consequences. You should probably stay away from that particular Wally for a while in case they recognize you, but beyond that, you have nothing to worry about.

In terms of the way it all made you feel, that's just the intimidation tactics they use. They make it seem like you've stolen from them personally, and that you've actually harmed real people, even though you definitely did not. I can't stress that enough - unless you actually attack an employee or trick them into taking the fall for you somehow, you did not harm anyone.

Catching shoplifters and making them feel like assholes is just a loss prevention/security guard's job. They barely have any authority and they get paid the same whether they catch you or not. They're basically just shitty actors who wish they were cops.

Legally, you're fine as long as you don't try to lift from the same store anytime soon. Ethically, you are completely, absolutely, 100% clear. You did not harm anyone.

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Loundrel wrote

Hone Despot has those too. My guess is that they can use software to identify a thing in the screen as a person, but can't store any info about them. The law seems to be about recording and collecting the data, but that wouldn't stop them from just putting boxes around anything the computer identifies as a person. They just wouldn't be able to track that person and determine their facial features, gait, body shape, age, etc. to save in a database for future profiling. This is 100% speculation though, so don't go spreading it around as fact.

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Loundrel wrote

Reply to Lifting alcohol by Wheelz

Hole Feuds is surprisingly easy. My strategy was the classic "use a cloth tote bag as your basket and then just leave instead of going through the checkout" method. I say "was" because I did get caught a couple times when I was being a little overconfident about it, but that's 2 out of probably over 100 times I went, and they never found out about the rest (probably because IL has laws against collecting biometric data, including face recognition), but you could probably use a similar strategy, just maybe altered to better suit your age and condition.

Age specifically though, because I was doing this a couple years ago when I was 30/31, so before I'd pick my $60 bottle of gin, I'd chat with the person working the booze zone (seems less suspicious that way) and get their recommendations. If you look older than your age, or can make yourself look older, you might be able to pull it off, but a 17 year old browsing liquor might raise some red flags. Before I was 21, I could get into bars because I looked older and had a beard, but I'd often go with my friend who's a couple years younger and has OI (Osteogenesis Imperfecta) and is in a powered chair. A lot of the time, he could just tell the bouncer his OI makes him look younger, and essentially accuse them of being ableist and they'd usually let him in. Idk how well that would work at a grocery store, but maybe worth trying? I'd recommend trying just getting into a bar or something first just to see how you feel and see how well it works.

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Loundrel wrote (edited )

"There are upscale places tho where stealing one of their expensive bikes wouldn't have much foreseeable bad consequences."

As I said before, there are a lot of non-yuppies who commute by bike to jobs in yuppie neighborhoods. Every bespoke hat store, cafe with $12 lattes, Whole Foods, and crossfit gym is staffed by people who they don't pay nearly enough to live in the neighborhood, so they commute, often by bike. Some of them, such as multiple people I know (as I already said), are lifelong bike commuters who have, over years of replacing parts and fine tuning, made themselves super nice custom'd out bikes that are probably worth quite a bit.

If you see a really nice bike on a rack in a yuppie neighborhood, you have no way of knowing if it belongs to some yuppie who bought it new and has never even touched an allen wrench, or if it belongs to the person who made their $12 latte this morning, and who built their bike from a bare frame 8 years ago and has been gradually upgrading it since, and who depends on that bike for everything.

Unless you know of a surefire way to identify the owner of any random bike on the street, you're running the risk of SERIOUSLY screwing over someone who doesn't deserve it.

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Loundrel wrote

You could probably do a decent amount of damage with some superglue, and it would be pretty discrete as well. Squirt some into the door handles, the gas cap, the tire pump valves (or whatever they're called), or anything that could prevent an essential function. If you encounter an older cop car that doesn't have a remote unlock, you could squirt some superglue into the keyhole.

Gas cap and tire valves are probably the safest though, since they will only notice later at the gas station.

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Loundrel wrote

As much as I hate yuppies, bike theft is a truly shitty thing to do to a person. Also, if you steal a bike off a random bike rack, you don't even know that the owner is a yuppie - it could be someone who works in the yuppie neighborhood but commutes from their non-yuppie neighborhood by bike. Maybe they've been bike commuting for the past 15 years and finally saved up enough to get a really nice bike.

That's not a hypothetical - I know a decent number of people who fit that description. They're all just broke artists/musicians living in shitty apartments and punk houses, who have nice bikes because all those expensive components actually make their lives easier and aren't just status symbols.

Anytime you think you're stealing some yuppie's eco-bling status symbol, there's a good chance you're actually stealing the primary mode of transportation for someone who truly needs it and can't afford to replace it.

It's really not that hard to steal ethically - just stick to corporations. Nobody is harmed that way and pretty much all corporations deserve to be stolen from.

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Loundrel wrote

There is actually a movement to ban facial/biometric tracking and it's been successfully passed in a few places. So far, Illinois, Texas, and Washington have statewide biometric privacy laws, and California will be added to the list in 2020. There are also a few cities around the country that have similar laws, such as Boston and San Francisco. If you live in one of those places, you're in luck because no stores use facial recognition! Even if you're not in one of those places, there's a decent chance it'll appear on a ballot sometime in the next few years.

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Loundrel OP wrote

An LP who took his job way too seriously. Sure, there are plenty of things I should have done differently, but this guy acted like WF was his family's business instead of a huge corporation that wouldn't even notice if he died. I'd give more details on what actually happened, but the impression I got was that he is the type of LP who would scour sites like this for incriminating details, so I'd rather not take any chances.

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Loundrel wrote

I'll admit I've been guilty of the "caught. what now" post and I agree 100% that the majority of questions like that could be addressed in a stickied post. It's a seriously important topic and you can't exactly blame someone for wanting some advice when in that position. It could even be its own section of the wiki. We could have a section for how the most popular stores handle busts and another section for some basic legal info (felony limits, fines, etc.) for various states/provinces/countries. As annoying as it might be a lot of the time, one of the most important functions of this group is giving noobs like me a place to learn from experienced lifters.

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Loundrel wrote

Reply to Tips by BeyondGoodnEvil

I've only done it once, but I was able to get away with a Pencil ($120 iPad stylus) super easily. I wasn't even particularly slick about it - I tried to go out a locked door and turned around expecting to see someone on my ass, but instead I was able to just walk right back through and out the other side. Flipped it a few days later on Craigslist for $100!! I've gotta hit that place again. I still can't wrap my head around why anyone would drop that much on a fucking stylus, but I'm glad someone did!

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Loundrel wrote

Reply to by !deleted17485

How bribeable do delivery workers tend to be? I know it probably varies a ton, but for a $1k item could you just slip them $100 to say they couldnt find your address or something?

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Loundrel wrote

Did you conceal with the school bag (backpack?) or did you use a canvas tote bag? Putting an item in a tote raises way less suspicion than a backpack or messenger bag. Also, did you just walk straight from the butcher to the door? If you want meat, the pre-wrapped stuff is way easier to get away with, but if you really want to get it from the butcher, make sure that's not your last stop before leaving. If the butcher or any other worker gets suspicious and starts watching you, they'll be more likely to lose interest if you just continue shopping for a little bit than if you go straight for the door.

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Loundrel wrote

Reply to comment by LiftyLoo_FU1349 in by !deleted12092

New in-box from the store though? They can definitely trace when the item is stolen from a person and they've registered it and everything, but can they trace it if it's never even been activated?

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Loundrel wrote

He applied for that specific job because he was desperate. Obviously I don't know his specific situation, but I'd make a strong bet for it having something to do with our society failing to care for the sick, elderly, and otherwise disadvantaged among us. Think about it this way - what are the odds an 80 year old would apply for a bottom-tier job at Walmart just out of boredom? There are a lot of people in this world, so it's probably happened at least once, but the vast majority are desperate.

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Loundrel wrote

Whatever the fuck happened, I guess I missed it too. Last time I logged on, i_buy_shit seemed like just about the most consistently helpful, knowledgeable person on here. That was maaaaybe 24 hours ago and now they're posting under a new username and getting downvoted to oblivion. Seriously what did I miss?!

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Loundrel wrote

Reply to by Axibop

Greetings, fellow criminals! Let's all get to know each other a little better by taking turns describing, in great detail, our last shoplifting trips. Make sure to mention the exact location, date/time, and your full name.. to help everyone get to know you! I sure do love committing crimes!

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