LostYonder

LostYonder wrote

We've put into place a system of economic and political relationships that limits our capacity to actually be human and to see that system as superior and infallible, at least in an imagined capacity to correct itself. the assumption of self-correction - that with planning we can make everyone happy, that with proper technology we can over come climate change, etc. - is highly destructive...

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LostYonder wrote

Isn't the underlying issue commodification and profit? The question is, how do we do away with (abolish) profit as the underlying force of social relations? If there is no profiteering, than there is no extraction.

Our bodies "extract" vitamin D from the sun as plants "extract" energy (simplistically) through photosynthesis. But these are are predicated on systems of interdependence and sustainability which profit making disrupt and destroy.

Or am I missing something???

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LostYonder wrote

Add in there that in the Israelization of India, the Muslim minority is the target. In 2002 in the state of Gujarat, where Modi was then Chief Minister, he orchestrated a pogrom against Muslims that killed more than 1000 innocent people and destroyed entire neighborhoods. In the state of Assam today, hundreds of thousands of Muslims are having their citizenship taken away simply because the borders moved following Partition in 1947. These leaves all the Muslims in Assam as suspicious, leading extremely precarious lives. And now there is Kashmir and the wholesale slaughter and mass imprisonment of Muslims.

India is a living nightmare for its 170 million Muslims - the second largest Muslim population in the world...

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LostYonder wrote

Buddhism is intricately interwoven into the prevailing economic systems. Tibetan Buddhism is feudal, at best, enslaving thousands to serve the extremely hierarchical sangha.

In Myanmar, Buddhism is a mafioso system thriving off corruption and military protection. In Thailand it is capitalist and deeply nationalistic. Across the world, Buddhism is an extremely violent religion not just through its systems of oppression and its hierarchies of belonging, but also towards non-Buddhists - for which it has a long history of intolerance. Sri Lanka, Thailand, Myanmar are only modern manifestations of Buddhist violent intolerance...

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LostYonder wrote

Here are a couple of things I had bookmarked, though it has been a few years since I went through this stuff. Some of it is common sense, but some of it might be helpful. I didn't end up talking to others as the woman I was concerned about woke up and left her abuser...

https://www.joinonelove.org/learn/help_a_friend/

https://www.thehotline.org/2017/02/16/supporting-someone-returning-to-abusive-relationship/

https://www.safehorizon.org/programs/supporting-someone-emotionally-abusive-relationship/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/presence-mind/201510/how-help-someone-in-abusive-relationship

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LostYonder wrote

This is a pretty fucked up situation! I am sorry you have to deal with so much - but the fact that you are reaching out, trying to seek a solution for your sister is an amazing first step. quite honestly though, nothing is going to help until she wakes up to the reality of her situation and sees for herself that she needs help. The fact that she is so blind to the danger she is placing her children in is disturbing, though certainly a usual pattern.

There must be several organizations that you can find online that work with abused women - reach out to them and seek advice. They have seen it all, they know what you can do to really help her. Get assistance/guidance from people who know what to do. Do not call in CPS at this point...

Hope your sister sees the light soon!

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LostYonder wrote

find a supply of dead animals to put in his yard everyday (or garbage)

spray paint his car - "entitled animal killer"

slowly buy up all the stock in his company and have him fired

pay a prostitute to report a story of exploitation and rape to the local paper

pay the prostitute to seduce him and take pics then blackmail him

flatten his tires every few days, put sugar in his gas tank, a rock in his windshield wiper

make anonymous public statements about his scandalous behavior, including that he was friends with Epstein

have fun with it!

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LostYonder wrote

My first reaction to this question was, like a few others, make it free. But on reflection, it is more complicated than that. Any public service comes out of a state apparatus to collect funds, construct and organize transportation systems, and ultimately to regulate those systems. Further, transportation systems predominately serve the interests of capital - to move laborers from home to work and consumers to places of consumption. There are other uses, but the driving force of transportation is capitalism.

Destroying it is unfortunately also not a solution. Most of our cities and towns, particularly in the US but increasingly everywhere, are constructed for cars. Our cities are predicated on unequal transportation options and destroying public transportation will impact poor and marginal classes most dramatically.

In short, we have created a dependency on public transportation. The issue is reorienting it away from moving laborers and consumers to fostering inter- and intra-communal connections, for creating paths of exploration and appreciation of diverse places in the larger communities in which we live. It needs to be retooled away from its capitalist and statist foundations and ultimately fade away when those structures are destroyed (sounds like a vaguely familiar argument, I know)...

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LostYonder wrote

Leftist/radical to a point. The privilege that we white cishet men have is unimaginable and so naturalized in our own constructions of the world and structurally reinforced that being able to truly step out of it is near impossible.

First, mentally and ideologically, we can certainly espouse radical ideas, including significant critiques of our own privilege. Though, most of what we espouse is theory advanced by other white cishet men. Few of us engage the ideas of oppressed thinkers.

Second, in action, we can be on the streets but, as a previous thread had exposed, we have the privilege of punching Nazis that people of color don't have. Even in how we protest, commit illegalist activities, confront those in power, we are protected by our privilege. Our actions are defined by our privilege.

Third, few of us actually have the capacity for empathy, care, and to hear (not just listen) what others are saying. Privilege has ingrained in us particular modes of sociality that preclude true radicalism. Again, many of us attempt to transcend our conditioning, but it is a struggle with our own privilege.

The mere fact that one will argue that we actually can be radical is itself an indication that true radicalism remains elusive...

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Reply to comment by LostYonder in studying in the US ? by cryptolake

LostYonder wrote

Very true - it is possible to find supportive niches, which might just be one or two people, within most universities. And yes, some programs/departments tend to be more questioning/critical than others, though history and English can also be extremely conservative fields, lots of nationalists of the liberal bent.

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LostYonder wrote

I can't suggest specific organizations, but they should be pretty easy to find:

Sanctuary organizations/churches that are over flooded right now in different cities Various food banks that cater to immigrants and others Black Lives Matter Legal funds for various victims of police brutality

Most such organizations are required to make public the percent that goes to programs versus overhead costs and from their websites I'm sure you can learn more about the specifics of their work and if it matches with the values you are seeking to support.

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Reply to comment by LostYonder in studying in the US ? by cryptolake

LostYonder wrote

Pretty broad questions. the american higher education landscape is extremely diverse in regards to the kinds of institutions - community college, liberal arts college, 3rd/2nd/1st tier state schools, private universities, big city, small town, midwest, east coast, etc. Many are horrid, some try, some are outstanding, some have the reputation of being outstanding but are cesspools of intellectual mediocrity. The vast majority are embedded in "liberal" ideas and thus, ultimately quite intellectually conservative, distracting students from learning by fostering cultures of binge alcoholism, rape/sexual abuse, and concerns over future jobs and skill sets. Though, there remains a few, though rapidly shrinking, pockets of more radical thinking and politics - one has to go out of their way to unearth them on campuses. Thus, where you are located makes a difference - being in an environment where you can escape the campus and engage larger social/political life, connect with like-minded people in the town/city where you end up...

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Reply to comment by LostYonder in studying in the US ? by cryptolake

LostYonder wrote

Partly depends on where one is coming from, their name, accent, and color of skin! Most universities are supportive of their students - foreign students after all are their cash-cow. Though, most countries these days are fascist hellholes or on the verge of becoming such, we just have the added cultural practice of shoot-'em-up-vigilante gate-keepers...

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LostYonder wrote

Hope it all works out for you. In what regards are you seeking advice? where to go/what to study? university life? funding? anarchist networks? how to subvert the system???

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LostYonder wrote

First, "rights" is a legal idea dependent on a state to give them and protect them. Second, health care isn't a right - it is a basic human need. Allowing it to be controlled and defined by for-profit private interests/corporations is criminal, be they insurance companies, hospitals/doctors, researchers, or pharmaceutical companies.

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LostYonder wrote

Maoism! Yeah, I know - but I was a naive high school student intrigued by China, until I went there when Deng Xiaoping was in power and saw the paranoia, poverty, fear, authoritarian control, environmental destruction. It was my waking to the realization that all manifestations of the state and not just the liberal state were inherently evil...

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