LPboy

Reply to comment by LPboy in Question about PI's... by bigchugnus

LPboy wrote

Well, I've kind of already taken the risk of listing my job history. Not many people in LP work the same exact stores, and to be completely honest when I worked for the outlet that starts with a B and rhymes with Hells, I worked with some of the most intelligent people i've ever met, they would definitely catch on if they were to ever be curious and scroll through these forums.

LP is a very investigative line of work, and by nature the people who work LP will be very investigative.

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LPboy wrote

You don't have to say anything at all though. Literally just walk away or run lol. Most lifters never admit to anything when approached, so it wouldn't exactly get you in the clear. Most lifters end up admitting to the offense once back into the office.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in Question about PI's... by bigchugnus

LPboy wrote

You're living in the past dude. Trust me when I say, there is definitely crazy shit that goes on within LP. Fortunately in Feb of 2020 my non-disclosure agreement expires, than I can really tell you guys some crazy shit.

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LPboy wrote

If you lifted from any TJX companies such as TJ MAXX, Marshalls, or Homegoods, and you've been lifting a good amount than yes. I worked for TJX and we had a National Task Force that would follow big time lifters to their home and take pictures of everything, such as a PI would. I've heard of even some dollar store franchises doing the same.

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LPboy wrote

1st Comment is true. If you're at the point where you're being approached, as LP if we let you go based on something you said, we can get fired. Because at this point it's considered a non-productive detainment.

Honestly if you're lifting from somewhere that's hands-off, just run if you're approached by LP. We're not allowed to do anything, we can't even chase in hands-off retailers. The most we can do is get your tag and vehicle info, and make a police report. 95% that police report is never followed up on unless it's near felony amount.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

That's pretty smart lol, usually when someone I suspect is a lifter, speaks with an associate, I'll typically contact the associate and ask what was said.

100% of the time though, I don't care if it's pope Francis, if you look in the camera i'm watching you haha.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

Hello,

Thanks for the questions, I'll try to answer them the best I can.

Blind spots in HG suck, but usually if you were to enter a blind spot with a piece of merchandise and then you exit the blind spot with out it, we would go check the area for that item. If it's not there we can assume you have concealed it.

Hmm, I only worked a Marshall's once or twice. For starters Marshall's LP is way under paid, but they have the exact same policies across the board. Hands-off, no chase (depends on who's with you that day :p). You must still take into account though, TJX has some of the most highly regarded LP training throughout the industry.

The short answer is we dont wait at all. If you've been in the store before, and we have you on camera concealing and exiting, we've probably made police reports. Now once you're nabbed for something small, we can reference how ever many police reports have been made in the past against you. If you're a big time lifter, we have a national task force that will build a case and follow you home, present to law enforcement and you will possibly never be approached by LP until its confirmed you have a warrant.

Good question, every company I've worked for thus far does have a policy for approaching ticket switchers. At TJX specifically, you would need observe the lifter removing the ticket from a lower priced item and placing it on a higher priced item. At this point, once you've paid for the merchandise you can be approached, we dont even have to wait for you to exit.

I'm not sure I understand. If you're saying that you purchase items, remove the ticket and than go back in the store, select an item and return it without buying it, than I can tell you that we did have a process for it. It's called pick up and return, and it's actually the most common method of theft at HG. We dealt with a lot of organized retail crime, where big groups would walk out with over $500 of merchandise, and go directly to another store and return it for store credit, they than sell the store credit card for a reduced price at a pawn shop.

I hope this answers all your questions, also if you're in south florida it's possible we've ran into each other a few times at HG lmao.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

Haha yeah, the typical load up a suitcase.

Honestly, if I saw an old man with his wife in the store with a suitcase, I probably wouldn't blink an eye. But if I see someone who fits the profile of a lifter, I might pay a bit more attention. Keep in mind, lifters look at camera's, they look around, they do things that normal shoppers don't.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

Mmm, I think I know what retailer you're speaking about now. That's not the one I was employed with, the company I was employed with was much smaller, and I believe only exist in the south.

I would say that being fast is more suspicious, in my experience regular customers usually walk slow and walk every aisle. Lifters usually go towards what they want pretty quickly. The longest I've ever watched someone, who turned out to be lifting would be about 2 hours. This lady loaded up a suitcase, and travel sized bag with over 90 pieces of baby clothes, total was about $1,800.

she did turn out to be sentenced for 1 year and 1 month, which I didn't really agree with. Too harsh for lifting.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

Hmm perhaps we're thinking about two different B outlets. The one where I was employed did not have any uniformed LP. They're currently undergoing a re branding, they will be called G0rdm4ns.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in Caught. Charged. by k2d2

LPboy wrote

The only way that you'd be caught while concealing in a fitting room, is if you're already being watched before hand.

We usually count what you go in the fitting room with and what you come out with. so if you do go in with 5 items and come out with 4, we will check the fitting room. if we can't find that one item we can approach you. Some companies are a bit more strict on fitting room stops, so perhaps one small item in the fitting room won't be approachable.

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Reply to Caught. Charged. by k2d2

LPboy wrote

I sincerely hope everything turns out well for you.

I'd like to explain how they were able to come to the conclusion that you lifted in the changing room.

When we work a fitting room, we will count how many items someone goes in with, and than how many them come out with. Once you come out the fitting room, someone, sometimes a store employee, sometimes another LP personnel will go into that fitting room and check it quickly for any merchandise that they did not see you come out with.

Here is an example: I am watching someone through the CCTV surveillance system, I observe them select 4 shirts from a rack, and quickly enter the changing room. When the person comes out, I see them come out with only 2 shirts, I go and check the fitting room for the two missing shirts, they are not there. At this point, I am allowed to approach the lifter given the information I've gathered.

Hope this helps.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in Caught. Charged. by k2d2

LPboy wrote

Great advice, I just want to come in and say I personally have never been trained to manipulate anyone, I was trained to be respectful to lifters because we're all human and we don't know what lifters are going through.

The part where you said this "Most times, if you just don't stop, they don't chase you-- if they do, you can countersue for assault."

is not true, and I don't mean this in an offensive type of way, and I'm not trying to be a dick. I'm just trying to give good advise as well, LP is protected under the Shopkeepers privilege law. While it is true that some retailers will not chase or touch you, rest assured that if you do steal from a retailer that is hands-on and will chase you, they are protected by shop keepers law.

I know this because when I worked for an Outlet that began with a B, it was hands-on and I'd be encouraged by managers to chase until law enforcement caught up, one particular time I chased a lifter for 2.5 miles. I did NOT want to chase them, but I had to follow instruction.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

The short answer is, I don't know much about how the system works, because I never joined their task force. I was offered a position 3 times and turned it down just because I'm not a fan of having someone follow me home and taking pictures of me.

I had heard of one of the members having a private investigators license, but as far as the actual following to your home, it was done by the members of that task force which were employed by TJX (Tj-Maxx, Marshalls, Homegoods, ETC.)

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

That's crazy, I didn't know there camera game was up there like that.

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LPboy wrote

As LP, i'd definitely say that smaller palm-able items such as SD cards. I'd say maybe torn out the pack though, since usually the packaging for SD cards is pretty over done. I tend to not approach a lifter when they've taken smaller palm-able items as they are easier to discard and they're a risk.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

Oh that grocery store has camera's and plenty of them. They're only there for Loss prevention chain managers and investigators though.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

When I was there back in 2012, we didn't have a sensor to detect detacher magnets. They do build cases, and they work with the United States Secret Service to single out dangerous individuals. More than likely, you might of given off a few signals, perhaps you stared directly into the camera, or you came in with a backpack. Maybe they recognized you?

I'd say stay away from Macy's or any store that has a hands-on policy and handcuffs, both companies that i've worked for that were hands-on, were far more aggressive with building cases and following up with the Police Department. When I worked at the Outlet that starts with a B, I was almost ritualistically at the local Police department before a shift, just handing in video and making statements.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

There's a few. The one that has stood out from the others, and has been more consistent is when a lifter looks directly at the camera. Yes, we can tell when you're looking directly at it, and when you do we're almost immediately on the phone with the local police department lol. some more common mistakes that are taught as "signals", random selection (not looking at size or price before putting merchandise in your cart.) Concealing merchandise out in an open aisle is a bad idea too, because we have to be 100% certain that you have the merchandise on you and if we don't know exactly where it's located we get kind of nervous and might not approach you.

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Reply to comment by LPboy in LP AMA by LPboy

LPboy OP wrote

You're welcome!

First, I'm glad you're okay! If you've hit Homegoods consistently for about a year, there's a good chance you're on their radar. Homegoods has a National Task Force that focuses entirely on consistent shoplifters. Have you noticed someone following you home? More importantly has LP ever approached you? Has a manager or store employee ever approached you and given you aggressive customer service? If you can answer yes to any of these, chances are you're on the radar.

I really wish I could say that you'd be alright if you stopped, but it really depends on whether they have a case on you yet. Usually the National Task Force would go down their list of targets, build a case, gather video, and present to the local police department in hopes of getting a warrant.

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