GoodOldWorkingClass

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to comment by User_Eye7172 in Graffiti propaganda by User_Eye7172

It wasn't rhetoric, but you'd never know different.

When I say "Get a job" I don't mean it in any moral sense of rightness. Get a job or rob a bank, I don't care. I was just trying to say do something with your time that puts money in your pocket. You're gonna be old one day and what will you have to show for your time on earth? A life wasted?

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to comment by CT_Paterson in by !deleted31441

I don't know where you buy your phones but if you're like the vast majority of people, you'd buy in a store or mall kiosk, not from someone on the street, and it usually comes in a box. You don't turn it on before buying cause you trust the store/kiosk and you know you can bring it back if it's defective. Am i starting to make more sense than this original post??

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

I don't even think it's mistakes that get you caught. The most skilled lifter is bound to get caught if they lift long enough. On any given trip, the odds are heavily in the lifter's favor because the skilled lifter has the element of surprise (never know when they strike) and has no rules other than not to get caught. Still, if you lift regularly for 30+ years, LP is gonna get lucky that one time and happen to just notice you by accident.

The thing to do is develop a solid plan for what you're going to do when you get caught, and by caught I mean caught by LP (employees can't do sh!t so even if they call you, you can just ignore them). In most cases, if you hand back the merchandise you can just walk off and LP won't pursue, but then you have to think of what you're going to do when you come across the hard asses, the ones who gang up on you and want to hold you for the cops. That would be a tough situation to be in and how you handle is something you have to think long and hard about. I would certainly keep my mouth shut in front of them and the cops, and hire the best lawyer my money can buy.

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

Along the lines of what coinin9hands said, waiting for the opportunity might be worth it even when working alone in a store. I always pretend to do a few more rounds of walking the grocery aisles to see if the self check out attendant leaves the area. Might pull off a walkout that way or a quasi-walkout (where u stop at a self check out station but instead of scanning just bag everything and book it).

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

... which does NOT mean I don't do my best to act normal on the floor. There are things I don't do on the sales floor. I don't open packages. I take the whole item, never leaving packaging behind (cause I know from working in retail that the store won't know right away if item is missing, not for a long time).

When i do conceal on the floor, it's something either small enough to fit in my coat pocket or thin enough to fit between my abs and jeans. I reserve concealing for while i'm turning corners so it breaks LP line of sight. And while concealing, I make sure I cover as much of the item with my hand as possible, so if someone saw part of the act, they can't be sure if it's a store item i put in my pocket or something personal like a phone or wallet.

Lifting anything bigger for me involves pretending to scan it at the self check out, after legitimately scanning one or two cheap items. Works almost all the time. Risk: Minimal. If a missed scan is noticed by employee, it's chalked up to scanning error and we re-try (which is why I'm always prepared to pay for the item and return it at a later date).

2

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

It's not written that far back. It was still modern day even in 2007 but 14 years is an eternity in the life of store policies and procedures.

That being said, after reading this I found a lot of his "information" to be incorrect, meaning my experience does not confirm it. For example, he says single males who walk into the store fast and carry just a basket instead of a shopping cart, and who walk straight to a specific area or hang around too much in an area without actually "shopping" are instantly watched. This is ME pretty much most of the time, due to my nervousness, and I can tell you that NO ONE's been watching me. And I would know because I treat everyone around me as potential LP so if I spot the same person again as I move around the store, I abort. Period.

Literally, I regularly do most of the "suspicious" things like watch for cameras, take too long to examine something or look around, etc. And yet to this day I have not been made, after lifting tons of stuff, even doing walkouts.

This leads me to believe that just like our advice here, former LP advice is largely anecdotal as well. Just like there's no magic bullet in shoplifting that works all the time, there's no foolproof way LP uses to determine who's a shoplifter. For what it's worth, I've come to the conclusion that LP "catches" are more a matter of luck on their part than any special skill or strategy ... (to be continued)

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

If I'm gonna stuff cereal boxes with items i plan to lift, I may as well just do a plain walk out after bagging them in a blind spot. In terms of risk, what the hell's the difference??

If staff catches me doing this, they may as well notice me walk out. The intent in both cases is clear.

2

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Lol, no, I don't let their luck get that far. The plates part I can control.

I make sure to park quite a ways away from the store's lot, so if caught and i have to run, i pretend I came to the store on foot and start walking around a block or two until LP is gone. Then I come for my car in the adjacent lot. No problems so far.

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

I got caught a year and a half ago, walking out with just one box of chicken dinner from the hot foods counter of a local supermarket. They say you should be in and out quick. Bullsh!t. I went in, ordered the food, and walked out in less than 30 seconds. LP most likely was just sitting in the seating area where he had a continuous view of the hot foods counter AND my entire path out of the store.

They say LP is not supposed to stop you past the front doors. Bullsh!t. Guy stopped me in the middle of the parking lot. I just gave the item back and walked away. No harm.

Moral of the story: No advice is foolproof, and just like us, LP has no rules. They do whatever the heck they want until they either lose their jobs or somebody breaks their teeth.

My opinion: in spite of what anyone says, at the end of the day there's only so much we can do to avoid getting caught. You can't think of everything, and you don't know where LP could be (their whole success depends on that fact). Eventually, LP will get lucky just happen to notice you.

By the way, just cause you haven't got caught doesn't mean you haven't been made. Just like the full-on pigs, LP is the final judge of who to stop and who to let go. It's fair to say that we might owe some of our getaways to the fact they were eating lunch at the time and didn't want to get their fat asses of their chair.

3

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

There's no reliable way to tell but as you see more LP it'll be obvious to you that they don't feel like real customers because THEY DON'T LOOK LIKE THEY'RE SHOPPING.

I can't stress that enough. Most of the time these guys don't seem to carry a cart or basket. Unlike customers, who seem focused on products and move from one aisle to another, these guys hang around in one particular area usually pretending to make a phone call while manhandling unrelated products one after another. This is all hard to put in words but as you see more LP you'll develop your own sense for what they look like.

Last but not least, if you spot them close to you in two or more different aisles/areas, there's a good chance they're following you and are trying to maintain a continuous line of sight (required for a proper stop).

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

You said stores are spending more on security because their insurance costs are eating them alive. Can you elaborate on that?

In terms of risk, I separate stores into those that I know have plain clothes LP and those that don't. It's LP I'm really worried about, not cameras. I've worked in retail and I've seen security rooms. Not only do cameras NOT cover the whole store, they're not even watched in real time. There's only one or two LP per store and they're either out on the floor or doing paperwork most of the time.

Also, if LP were to follow the rules properly, they can't go from watching you conceal on camera to stopping you at the front doors cause they would have to break the continuous line of sight. Technically, you can't pull off a stop just from camera viewing even with one LP watching camera and radioing the other on the floor. The guy on the floor making the stop is NOT the one who saw you conceal. They would HAVE TO break the rules to make a stop. Their rules are absurd and make their job an impossible joke.

Finally, in my area, I know that LP don't work all of a store's open hours. It would be nice if anyone had info on actual working hours.

2

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to comment by moonlune in by !deleted31194

Not advocating anything, but so what if your real name and address ended up in this post?

Absolutely nothing in here is admissible evidence in any court. And even if it were, it would be worthless evidence on its own merit. How does your name and address in here prove in any way that YOU had anything to do with its posting or with your posts?

The only way to link you to this site is to dig up your ip address, which they won't get from raddle because it doesn't get saved. Raddle is based in a non-five eyes country, so in particular US law doesn't apply.

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to by !deleted31868

Question: What do you get when you put together a smartphone, a stoned street bum, and a coffee shop internet connection?

Answer: This post!

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

I'm not the one giving advice. My statements about self check out are not, as you say, "arguing". It's not an argument. I'm stating facts: I do self check out every.single.day. Pretend to scan items, pay for a cheap one, and i'm good to go. In the one case when an associate noticed something didn't scan, it was chalked up to a scanning error. End of story. No intent to lift. No LP involved.

I will do walkouts if I have to, but that IS intent to steal, and I prefer not to put myself in risk's way if it's not necessary. Self checkout works for me. Like I've said before, I don't need a 100% discount on my groceries (an 80% discount will do). What I do need is an essentially risk-free way to keep lifting till the day I die.

As for magnets, they're only good for lifting designer clothing, not groceries; and while I have lifted from designer stores, they've been untagged items. Since I don't need designer stuff right here and now, and since most malls have been closed due to Covid-19 I haven't felt the need to put a rush on the magnet project.

−1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to comment by Tastybiscuits in signs? by anythingadditional98

Yea, they're pathetic. When i used to work for WM our plain clothes LP did a lame job trying to look like a customer. He had no shopping cart or basket, just walked around manhandling products from several unrelated departments. Pretended to talk on the phone but it didn't make any sense cause he was jumping from topic to unrelated topic. What lifter worth his salt would be foolish enough to lift in plain view of that thug?

The only time I ever saw him stop someone, he stopped a street bum who looked coked out his head and didn't give a damn who was watching him, plus he'd been lifting regularly from this location so they'd made him. This time, he came in with a backpack, walked straight to the meat department and started stuffing the backpack with steaks. If you're lifting when you're that stoned and careless, I'd say you deserve to get caught.

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

I operate in a different scope from theirs. I lift just for personal consumption, not to earn a living off of it. So most of what they say doesn't really apply to me. It's hard to say how much of what they claim to have accomplished is true.

The truth is probably somewhere between their claim and what we believe can be realistically pulled off. I know that in my area anything worth a damn is under lock and key. I can't even lift a simple electric shaving razor at my WM's.

Other than a boost of confidence, I can't say I've gotten much out of their posts. I'm pretty much at the point where I've gotten all the advice i'm going to get in here, before diving into the study of magnets to liberate expensive brand name clothing (i've been procrastinating in this project cause right now pretty much everything is closed).

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

I can almost hear BigThief and CaptainSoda typing their tutorials about how to pull off big shit even as a beginner.

Oh and that guy, what's his name, Undetectable, will be telling you that you can lift anything you want, whenever you want!

7

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

Reply to comment by Jacie in by !deleted31194

Yes, I've heard of these cameras that replay past transactions but so what??

You did not forget. You made an attempt to scan each item. One or two failed to scan and you did not notice. Where's the intent to steal? What shoplifting case do they have in court? (assuming you can locate the person after they're gone, so u can charge them).

Camera can play all day for all I care. The only thing it can conclusively prove is that there was one or two unsuccessful scanning attempts, so its purpose, other than a scare deterrent, looks to be to alert the monitoring employee to go and assist customer IF customer is still at the till.

There is no way to prove that a missed scan was intentional. Customers are not cashiers and even cashiers miss scans. Go ahead, ask a self check out customer how often they look at their total before they're about to pay with the debit card.

Missed scans happen all the time, stores are aware of this and are willing to tolerate it for the money it saves in cashier wages. I'm very curious to see any real self check out shoplifting cases that have gone to trial (as opposed to just pled guilty).

1

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

Isn't the machine able to detect things that are not scanned, and make a beeping sound?

This will depend on the store and what system they use. In my area there are stores that use the "dumb" system, which has no scale, so it has no way of telling what wasn't scanned when you drop items in the bag.

If they're using the smart systems, which weigh each item dropped in the bag and compare its weight to the weight of the item with the barcode just scanned, then you have to work a little harder: you have to use other tactics while you pretend to scan, such as not putting item in the scale area but instead putting it back in the cart (remember nothing was really scanned so the system is not expecting an item on the scale area).

Also the smart system scale does not work for items scanned with a hand gun, great option for big items that are obviously harder to lift.

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

You said employees cannot accuse you of shoplifting, what exactly can they do if they suspect someone? Do they report it to security?

It doesn't matter if they suspect someone of stealing. All they can do is tell the person that item X failed to scan and ask them to try again. Or if they see that someone just bagged stuff and is trying to leave without paying, they're allowed to politely call the person back in and ask them if they would like to pay.

In no way are employees to tell the person that they were stealing, and at WM employees are not to chase the customer past the front doors (it's a liability from a corporate perspective). I imagine most stores prohibit employees the same way, but I wouldn't be surprised if an employee, just like LP, breaks the rules on this. Somehow it feels personal when you see someone lifting, even if it's not your stuff.

As for informing LP, employees don't actually interact with LP, management does. So they'd inform management, and management could flag the event for LP (i.e. give LP the time it happened). It's up to LP whether to go back and review footage for that time, but clearly the worst that can happen at that point is that they might keep an eye out for you now that they know what you look like (hence the importance of wearing hoods, glasses, ... anything that obscures your appearance in a non-suspect way, ... and changing these often).

0

GoodOldWorkingClass wrote (edited )

Having worked in retail and spoken to store security I can confirm that they ask employees to keep an eye on people who walk in with backpacks or totes. That's why I take neither of those.

As for walkouts, it's become harder now during Covid 19 because the few stores in my area where this can be pulled off have now put screening stations in areas where you could walk past the main row of registers.

For example at WM, you can walk around the store with a shopping cart, grab what you need, and then head to pharmacy, bag items one by one in a brand new store bag (brought with you ahead of time), pull out an old receipt (kept in brand new condition), and then book it: by which I mean walk past all the registers like you paid for your stuff in pharmacy, flashing the receipt at the greeter, saying something like "have a great day". They won't bother asking you to stop as your stuff is bagged in WM bag.

0