FormerRetailStoreManager

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote

I knew two guys named Harry and Marv who did this at a toy store in NYC. They each hid in separate playhouses, and once the store closed, they stuffed all the money from the registers into bags. I think they took a bit of candy too. Anyway, someone saw them from the sidewalk and threw a brick through the window to trigger the alarm. They were busted by LO. This happened around 1992, and I think they’re still in jail.

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote (edited )

Yes, they can get you on past transgressions if you were on camera and can be positively identified. It’s called case-building. Just because you didn’t steal that time does not mean you cannot be arrested and charged for prior lifts.

Source: 15 yrs of case-building experience.

ETA: regarding “bluffing”.... honestly, it depends on the store’s policy and the manager. I’ve bluffed many times, but I’ve also actually called the police many times. Generally speaking though, unless the items were of high value or you were making threatening comments towards employees or customers, they were likely bluffing. Calling police results in a lot of paperwork, emails, and phone calls that most managers would rather avoid.

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote

Definitely get a public defender.

The sheer amount of time could potentially be enough to have the case dropped. You are entitled to a speedy trial by law. 1.5yr is not speedy.

No video evidence or proof of theft? I’m surprised any DA would waste their time attempting to prosecute this case.

Keep your fingers crossed that the employee no longer works for Walmart. If she doesn’t, she may no longer care to show up and provide witness testimony.

Keep us updated.

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote

I agree. LP and management have to think about their jobs and feeding their own families. If their bosses found out they aren’t holding shoplifters accountable in accordance with company policy, they’ve put their jobs at risk. Also, they’ve already heard every excuse imaginable and are frequently desensitized to them all. When it comes to food, there are so many social programs to get free stuff. SNAP, food pantries, etc.

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote (edited )

If LO is involved, yes. If they have you concealing a high or moderately priced item on camera or walking out, they will likely get LO involved.

If LO is not involved, maybe. If that store has a loyalty program, they can search their database by looking up the name on the credit card. If you’ve joined the loyalty program using your real name, they will find your information. They can also go through all your transaction history with that same credit card number to see when you’ve been in the store. They can review past camera footage based off those dates and times to begin case building.

With that said, if they only think you’ve stolen something, there’s not anything they can do other than sharing your photo and info with employees and keeping a close eye on you when you’re in the store. If this is the 1st time they’ve detected you and you took a low value item, I would not worry. Just stay away for a few months.

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FormerRetailStoreManager wrote (edited )

I have a hoarding problem with toiletries. Shampoo, soap, skincare, haircare, razors, etc.

I used to have the mindset that I should always have 1 extra “in stock.” Then that number grew to 3 and eventually 5. I now have no less than 10 deodorants, 10 bottles of shampoo, 10 packs of razor cartridge refills, etc. I have to hide them from my straightlaced SO bc it got so out of control. And I slowly refill my SO’s bottles of shampoo and throw an extra razor cartridge refill into their toiletry box each week.

I essentially have my own little CVS/Rite Aid/Walgreens hidden in various closets throughout the house.

As far as hoarding things that I don’t need... I’m embarrassed to say. I compulsively lift those removable 3M hooks. I take them all: the small white plastic ones as well as the heavy duty silver ones. I use them everywhere. I have a few in the coat closet to hang umbrellas. I have a row of them on the lower half of my kid’s bedroom door so he can reach his own coats. I ran out of places to use them, but I still take more.