DissidentRage

DissidentRage wrote

There is also the problem that these systems just make things really easy, and for the general populace, without really overt consequences they will continue to use these services in complete apathy for what they do. Worse is they hamper those of us who are aware of these things and do have a problem with the way they work, because those people make use of those services a prerequisite to keep in touch with them.

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Reply to Whyyy by Tequila_Wolf

DissidentRage wrote

If only someone had put in an analysis of the workings of capitalism to understand or even predict such a thing.

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Reply to comment by DissidentRage in Raddle codebase by surreal

DissidentRage wrote (edited )

every MVC framework out there is shit regardless of language and the ones that are not MVC are just an entagled mess of code. imo MVC leads to a mess too. "The web/database is just an IO device" why should the logic of the program depend on the UI stuff and the ORM?

This tells me you've never actually done serious work with any MVC frameworks - at least none that were any good. The point is to separate those things out into different concerns so that if you needed to change one component you wouldn't have to rewrite the entire application.

The idea behind "the web/database is just an IO device" is specifically to prevent you from needing to address the way the UI and ORM are set up if you need to change those things. You could for instance move from MySQL to MariaDB or PostgreSQL by pointing it to a different database server and using a different package to handle the database transactions without having to change your actual application structure.

It only becomes a problematic mess when you're looking at code from people with no system design experience who couldn't tell the difference between a repository and a factory or write SQL statements into controller methods. By separating things out at different levels you make it so you only have to deal with the levels of complexity of operations equal to the levels of complexity of the changes you need to make to your application.

All languages have something to offer. Python offers readabilty and that makes coding less painful that's why it's the first choice for someone without a CS background and the only choice for someone that doesn't want to learn programming but has to cause it helps them in their field.

Kinda making my point and emma's. If you don't want to learn to do proper development you have no business architecting something like Postmill because you will end up doing a disservice to your user base in the end.

Python2 is almost dead Python3 is a better and faster(>=3.6) language.

Support is not adoption rate. And yes Python 3 is much better and faster than 2 but you still have to contend with the PEP 394 standard which suggests that the basic python package simply create a symbolic link to python2.

Why do you hate virtual envs, they are like very simple app "containers" and you can have different versions of the same package.

It's work that's only required because of the fundamentally broken development environment that it needs to run in, which I covered on the previous reply. Perhaps there are ways now of making it more convenient, but it's still working around an antipattern that was borne out of necessity since the Linux community has been carrying Python 2's dead husk.

My frustration at this comes from actually trying to migrate into the Python community and finding its development environment being fragile to the point of masochism.

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Reply to Raddle codebase by surreal

DissidentRage wrote

Hot take: Python web development, at the present time, is shit.

The divide between the 2 and 3 branches has existed since I've been in the field, with most Linux distributions (the most common platform for servers) still depending very heavily on scripts that work exclusively in 2. You will have an easier time writing for 2, but you will be contributing to a problem that has existed for a long time. Writing for 3 is the future. Unfortunately that entails having to run "virtual environments" within your server to feign all attempts to run Python code as using 3. This method has very steep requirements of consciousness and mistakes can break your entire setup. It is fragile to the point that even trying to update your pip install will break it.

I understand because Python in general is a nicer language. It has some really convenient shorthand syntax and the enforcement of whitespace is a real boon to code readability. But as a web development platform I don't see it as being worthwhile without having a dedicated sysadmin who will take the brunt of its shit practices so a web developer doesn't have to.

PHP may sometimes look like an ugly mess that still hearkens back to its days as a Perl imitator but nobody worth their salt as a developer writes procedural PHP anymore. With the most recent major release many of its performance problems have been streamlined. It basically works the moment it's installed, can hook up with an Apache/Nginx daemon that doesn't need to be restarted if your application runs into an error, and it has a top-notch package distribution system. PHP may be declining in popularity but it has a lot more to do with outdated snark, Haskell hipsters, and business managers wanting to use enterprise environments like .NET and Java, not because it's an intrinsically bad language.

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DissidentRage wrote

Dan Perry sees it differently. He bought the first section of his Trout Stalker Ranch in northern New Mexico in 2011, when the Rio Chamita that runs through it flowed Technicolor with toxic magnesium, phosphorus, and other chemicals leaked from the wastewater treatment plant upstream. He worked with the New Mexico governor to secure $8m for a cleanup effort.

“Now there’s clean water coming out of the Chamita,” he says proudly. Perry has easements on the north and south end of his property for public river access, but he restricts the majority of the waterway with a cable across the river hung with a No Trespassing sign. He feels he’s protecting his investment in restoring stream health. “Private property owners are some of the biggest conservation stewards right now,” he says. “I feel like the beauty of our lands and species survival is up to private landowners.”

You should be forming coalitions to clean up the environment, then, not using it as an excuse to close it off behind lock and key. This is clearly a ploy to make the idea of privatizing water palatable. The moment they have it all locked up, access is going to be a commodity, as it happened with another given example in the article.

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DissidentRage wrote (edited )

My earliest memories are living in a small flat with my parents, my mother just barely into adulthood, sleeping between them on a mattress in the floor, keeping warm during the winter nights with a hair dryer. Things did eventually improve somewhat, though we ended up bouncing around with friends and family members a few times, to almost having a relatively normal life when I became a teenager. My mother made her best efforts to make sure her kids were taken care of, to the point of withstanding the pain of wisdom teeth growing in fucked up for a couple weeks so that there was enough money for us to be fed.

I think this makes us relatively poor by US standards, and I was always aware of that. I always felt bad for the people who had it worse, even when my politics were admittedly pretty reactionary in nature.

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DissidentRage wrote

My partner is less radical and tries to "stay out of politics" because she has too many things going on. I think she agrees with some of my fundamental beliefs but she has a big problem with me shit-talking cops because there are cops in the family. Her family is largely pretty reactionary and quite fond of confederate paraphernalia, and gives her grief about her child becoming radicalized and not blindly agreeing to their lost cause bullshit. I point out that it's in the kid's best interests not to fall in line with reactionaries, being genderfluid and attracted to the same sex, which makes her a prime target for a lot of their worst beliefs. They may be family, but if push comes to shove, they would still gladly support someone who would probably kill the child. But because they're my partner's family, my perspective is always dismissed as rude.

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DissidentRage wrote

The state is merely an instrument of oppression of one class by another. Under capitalism it is bourgeoisie oppression of the proletariat, and under a transitional socialist state it is the opposite.

I think it's a mistake to refer to a government as a state in this situation because it's not tasked with protecting capital. Also "oppression of the bourgeoisie" doesn't make sense because oppression is a defining trait of being bourgeois.

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Reply to comment by DissidentRage in Give Up Activism by mofongo

DissidentRage wrote

Yeah I don't see what it suggests as an alternative. Even the section "A Modest Proposal" is just more "don't do anything." There's no affirmative proposal for anything to be found here.

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