Comments

11

BrownieKage wrote

in my country, babies gendered as girls get their earlobes pierced -because is "proper" for girls to wear earrings. it's done usually before they even learn to talk; parents don't want to wait a lot because they don't want to deal with the kid fighting it or protesting it. I find it profoundly dehumanizing

2

BrownieKage wrote

I'm like this too, and I'm terrified of certain interactions (especially those that might end up with me being screamed at) However, I've been learning to not just seethe and drown myself in self-righteous rage. I'm trying to use that energy to do something useful and stop that negative self-talk of being a coward for not speaking up. Sometimes I post about it on twitter, both what the bigot did and my thoughts on it. that alone helps me a lot to stop obsessing about how I was unable to stand up to them. it also has the added benefit of teaching other people about why that thing is bigoted and encourage them to stop acting that way (I know I've discoreved a lot of my own bigoted mindsets like this). and sometimges people answer my tweets with new insights, so it can generate a really interesting conversation. I also want to learn to use that energy to do art: draw a small comic, write an introspective piece or an essay, make an illustration or a slogan; that kind of thing

TL;DR: bearing with bigots sucks, but if confrontation is not your strongest suit there are other constructive things that you can do with your rage and get something good out of the interaction

2

BrownieKage wrote

I'm not a linguist at all, but it coincides with the narrative of gender not being suppossed to be self-reported. you get a gender assigned at birth, and your parents and community are supposed to gender you and teach you how to perform masculinity/femininity according to it. in this process, you are never expected to confirm or declare your own gender at all. it's more like a thing others see in you, than a thing you state for others to know