Basil

Basil wrote

Thanks! I could definitely use some help with some things, most of all my essay once I'm done writing it.

I know that the prestigious colleges have a fuckload of money, but they're still greedy assholes who will pinch every penny when they can. Just because they have enough money to support every student doesn't mean that they won't set a budget for how many they will support, and if that's the case then I don't want to hurt the poorer person. It sucks, but the best option I have here to help people is not trying to get the scholarships. Besides, My grandma is probably paying for my college and I would classify her as a rich asshole anyways, but she wouldn't give any money to poorer people. I'm still taking money from the rich, just a different rich person.

Thanks! I am, I thought I would get like a 1350 at best so it's really a relief to have a score higher than what I expected.

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Basil wrote (edited )

School has been okay. I feel really tired though, and that's with naps every other day and going to bed as soon as I finish my homework. I feel like that and extracurriculars are all I do now outside of the weekends.

Edit: I also ended up getting a 1410 on the sat so that's neat. Maybe some universities will give me the opportunity to pay them thousands of dollars per year if I'm lucky.

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Basil wrote

So I'm not quite sure what you're asking with the first one but I'll still try to answer it. The most important change when a noun becomes accusative (for the direct object or otherwise) is that the article preceding it also becomes accusative. So if it's masculine, der becomes den, ein becomes einen. For neuter, das and ein are both the nominative and accusative articles. For both feminine and plural, they use die for both nominative and accusative, and for feminine eine is both nominative and accusative, with no plural form of ein existing. This is the best way to tell case, but it's not as necessary for nominative and accusative because you'll learn to pick up which is which from context. There aren't really any other major changes with the accusative, but with a direct object it will typically come after the main verb.

With the dative case, der and das become dem, the feminine form of die becomes der, the plural form of die becomes den. Ein for both neuter and masculine becomes einem, and eine (feminine) becomes einer. These articles are basically something you need to memorize for German, 16 combinations each for Der and Ein, just because they will be the main indicator or case.

for my examples it's a mixture of both. The change in case (from das to dem) will never fail you, but usually you can figure it out from the verb too. With verbs that don't imply motion, for example sein, schlafen, tragen, etc., you can be pretty sure that it will take the dative meaning, i.e. that it will mean "in the house" rather than "into the house," simply because it doesn't make sense "schlafen in das Kino" to sleep into the cinema, but it makes sense if its "schlafen in dem Kino," to sleep in the cinema.

Most prepositions do have set cases, though now that I think of it the ones that are used most often are the two-way ones. An example of a few that don't are gegen, against, and durch, through, both of which take the accusative case and will never take the dative. There are also some that take only the dative and never the accusative, for example zu, meaning to, and mit, with.

Es geht. Aber du sollst benutzen mehr als nur mich, weil ich kein Lehrer bin. I ch hoffe nur, dass ich habe dich nicht verwechselt.

Really, you seem more than good enough at German for the level you're at. I wouldn't worry too much, you'll get more used to it and hopefully your professor can teach you better than I can. Good luck on your test tomorrow!

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Basil wrote

Kein Problem! So accusative is just the direct object (and some prepositions which I'll get into later), the thing that's receiving the verb. I eat the pasta. The pasta is the direct object, and would be in the accusative case.

The dative case is used for the indirect object (and also prepositions), which is the receiver of something. It's a bit harder to explain. In the sentence "I give a book to the boy," the book is accusative, and the boy is in the dative, cause the boy is the indirect object.

For prepositions, there a a few which can use either the dative or the accusative. These are called two way prepositions, and the distinction is generally that with the accusative, it implies motion, and with the dative, it's generally standing still. there are ten of these prepositions, which are: in, an, auf, hinter, neben, entlang, über, unter, vor, and zwischen. As said before, the difference in case marks a difference in meaning between these. For example, "Ich gehe in das Kino" is I'm going into the cinema, because Kino is in the accusative case. "Ich bin in dem Kino" is I am in the Cinema, because Kino is in the dative case. Worst comes to worst and you can't remember which is which, english is kinda nice in that a lot of them have roughly the same translation either way. Sure, there is technically a difference between I go into the Cinema (accusative) and I go in the cinema (dative), but they're very similar and I doubt any teacher would take points off if you just used the dative translation, cause into and in are basically synonyms these days.

Let me know if you have any questions or if I should clarify anything! I've never tried to help anyone with German before so I'm not sure if I hit the important stuff or not lol

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Basil wrote

Du wirst gut sein. Ist die Prüfung auf Deutsch? Dein Deutsch sieht mir nicht schlecht aus. Es gibt nur ein paar Dinge, die Ich auf Englisch sagen werde.

First in this form of in I'm pretty sure you want to use the dative instead of the accusative, because accusative implies motion into the object. Next, this might have been a typo, but it should be meiner Arbeit if it's genitive, or if it is supposed to be accuative you should put an und in between them. And one last thing, though this might just be because I'm not a native speaker, but I can't tell if ihren refers to Früchte, or a girl from your past not mentioned elsewhere in the sentence or something. But those are small things, you'll probably be fine.

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Basil wrote

Yeah, that's probably a good move. I would avoid taking it except that some of the colleges I want to go to are still requiring it, even after every exam for the past 8 months was cancelled. It's really not great to say that the SAT is a measure of intelligence though. You can't figure out how smart someone is by asking them to answer ~150 questions in 3 hours. Even if standardized tests were a good way to measure intelligence, a sample size of one is really small.

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Basil wrote

Reply to comment by ziq in It's kinda surreal by masque

Hell, it's even funny if you're on the inside but can get out. I feel bad for my friends who don't have the means to leave though.

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Basil wrote

Reply to comment by bloodrose in Against anarcho-smugness by ziq

I think I know what you're asking but I'm not quite sure, so just tell me if any of what I write sounds like bullshit, partly because I'm not exactly sure what you're asking and partly cause I'm not exactly sure what I'm saying.

People expect anarchists to side with socialists because there aren't that many anarchists and typically the socialists are the ones who have views closest to our own. But that's not what the article is about. I'd say the article is about how, even if you don't like someone, when they get hurt by a common enemy, you don't revel in their defeat, especially not if you don't have the means to enact something better. It's not even being happy if they win, it's more like you don't celebrate when a movement that would at the very least try, in their own little way, fucked up as it may seem to anarchists, to make life better for the common person, especially if it aligns with at least part of what you stand for. Doing so may lead anarchists away from actual beliefs and towards a state of mind where, yeah, they still hold anarchist principles, but they're not willing to consider any alternatives, to the point where they would rather pat themselves on the back for having such great beliefs than try to make the world even a bit more inline with those beliefs.

In short, it leads to anarchists praising the maintenance of the status quo because it allows them to hold onto a sense of superiority that without the status quo they might not be able to maintain.

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Basil wrote

Reply to comment by lettuceleafer in Who here is FBI? by zddy

Do you happen to know where to find that report? It sounds very interesting but the only one I can find is from 2010 and is pretty short, not mentioning ant places online where anarchists congregate (unless that's the one you were talking about of course)

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Basil wrote

Last night I had a dream that a flock of medium sized flightless birds were in my yard and a few of them had unintentionally gotten into my house. They seemed quite intelligent, as one of them showed knowledge of how to use a door handle to try to get the others out.

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Basil wrote

Accelerationism like, the idea that if capitalism is progressed enough then it will either foster left wing ideas or collapse in on itself? I don't buy it. These days, the state would protect the corporations in such a way that I think it would simply lead to a strengthening of capitalism, and though that would in turn lead to more left wing ideas, it would also make it more difficult to dispose of when the revolution does eventually come.

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Basil wrote

I had to take a driving lesson yesterday and I broke down and cried like 8 times during it, then once more both before and after. I think I'll just use my bike.

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Basil wrote

I'm pretty ambivalent about voting. On one hand, it won't change anything and you can probably do something better with your time. On the other hand, It can't hurt, especially if you're voting third party, and would you actually do anything enjoyable or useful in those five minutes it took anyways?

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