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RosaReborn wrote

I like how realistic this text presents situations. It acknowledges that hopes for a pan-global movement of anarchism is unlikely and that other forces may have the advantage. I like how it looks to enable groups of people in fragmented spaces and acknowledges that climate change will effect places differently and thus solutions may need to be adaptable. That being said, to really address the causes of climate change, we must push a unified resistance to the destruction of the environment everywhere. Oil emissions in the USA still harm an autonomous community in South America. Plastic in the ocean still kills fish near Thailand. As someone working in renewable energies, I'd like to see a reduction of consumption across the board and a complete shift to renewable energy and sustainable living. States, including my own, claim to support this but hamper it at every step. Climate refugees may push the state to act but I can only foresee it acting in a reactionary way.

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Uproot wrote

Reducing consumption is not enough. You must completely disconnect your life from it.

We have worked on DIY projects that relied entirely on self-manufactured and recycled materials. For example we have successfully produced PCL (Polycaprolactone) in our lab, a high heat and impact resistance polyester with biodegradable feature. We used it for nearly everything that required durable framework. Another of our project was home-based wall electric battery consisted of throwaway lithium-ion laptop batteries. They are currently powering our lab and hackerspace. When the power goes out, and it did happened, we could sustain with solar or wind based power source, then routed the power to the wall battery panels. We also worked on solar panels that were produced entirely with home-made materials that does not involved toxic rare earth or heavy metal that pollute the environment.

References that our projects were based on here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hejOT7NF72E

https://jehugarcia.com/project-puerto-rico

https://mad-science.wonderhowto.com/how-to/diy-solar-power-make-your-own-diode-based-solar-panels-and-capture-suns-energy-0134833/

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ziq wrote

I agree completely and am also attempting to live in this way.

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zoneReNovator wrote

This sounds really cool. References are good, but I'd be interested to know if you made a record of what you tried anywhere.

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Uproot wrote

We have a repository on 0xacab.org but we'll share all the source codes once it gets to be employed in the area. Keeping minimal activities on the internet for now because of all the doxxing targeting our members and the organizations I'm part of.

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selver wrote (edited )

Not only climate change, but other issues as well. We live in a world with a proliferation of nuclear weapons and all sorts of other ways that groups can really fuck up other parts of the world. Localism is insufficient, each local will always be under constant threat of being destroyed if power is not being similarly fought in other places. The modern world is too small & connected.

Not that I think it's likely possible to do that, but the author doesn't really acknowledge the problem. If you're espousing localism, you sort of need to accept a fully nihilistic position about the hopes of continued survival for radical communities, as you are in a way completely giving up your power to defend what you've built.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'm not sure I'm understanding you here. I think that localism here is assuming that there will be resistance everywhere to some degree and that there will also be communication and organisation between localised groups where it is immediately useful or just desired.

And problems like the possibility of nuclear attack I think are assumed (that is, I think that the people in these localised places will simply live under that threat, though presumably there will still be (state?) actors doing work to prevent it), but I agree that there's room for it to be thought about more.
I guess since I'm living in sub-saharan Africa I think less about direct nuclear attacks since there seems to be little reason to bomb here relative to other places.
I'd be interested in hearing from you a more fleshed out version of what it might look like to have a non-localised approach to this situation.

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ziq wrote (edited )

As someone working in renewable energies,

How much of your work sources local renewable energy? Does the renewable energy industry largely rely on Chinese and Indian heavy-industry manufacturing and destructive bigag biofuels still, or is getting more sustainable?

reduction of consumption

As long as capitalism stays afloat, I don't think that will happen. Capitalism depends on constant growth.

I'd like to pinpoint when the markets hit the point where there's no room left to expand, so the whole system can finally collapse. Any greenwashing bandaids the neoliberals come up with will only prolong the planet's decay, and result in much more catastrophic disasters when the pile of cards does come tumbling down.

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RosaReborn wrote

As long as capitalism stays afloat, I don't think that will happen

Completely agree, there will be robots as functioning CEOs long after humans are dead.

And as to your question about renewables, it's in field of hydrogen storage, specifically hydrolysis of water for energy storage from wind turbines so no foreign influence or resource extraction