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[Week 1]: Suggestion Thread

Submitted by buzz in readingclub (edited )

In your suggestion please:

  • provide the name of the text
  • provide a stable link to access the text
  • give a brief description about the text / what intrests you in the text / why you think this would be good for the group

In general, voting should happen from monday, and end on friday (this is subject to change).

Comments

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7

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'm not sure what people are into, just going to throw out some ideas.

I would be willing to read anything at the resonance anarchist audio distro. They'll all be generally accessible reads that are at least kinda canonical for contemporary mainstream US anarchism.

It's been a while since I've read Fire At Midnight Destruction At Dawn: Sabotage and Social War, and I remember it being a good experience that left me feeling more able to imagine fighting back, so if one is sticking out to me I would suggest that.

If we want to pick stuff focused in indigenous or postcolonial struggles it means a bit more work and less likely that we find an audio version, so perhaps it's not ideal to start our reading there? Depends how enthusiastic people are. I'm happy to read stuff like this. Discourse on Colonialism is about 40 pages and a pleasant read, though ideally you would also read the introduction for relevant background.
Alternatively we could stick with Turtle Island and read 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance which is 70 pages but probably closer to 55 when you take out all the badass design.

Happy to help think through what potential readings to read, and I hope other people make some suggestions!

6

Malle_Yeno wrote (edited )

I would recommend Bookchin's "Anarchism, Marxism, and the Future of the Left -- Interviews and Essay, 1993-1998."

It gives a pretty good run-down of the development of leftist movements from his perspective, and presents the case for Communalism. Although, I'll go ahead and say that the essay "Whither Anarchism?" is just him ripping on other academics and I don't think there's a lot to be gained from the essay.

Edit: Spelling. I think I was a bit too hasty to say that there's nothing to be gained from "Whither Anarchism?" because he does put in some criticisms he has about developments in anarchism, like Anti-Rationalism and Primitivism.

Other things I would recommend would be the works of Simon Springer, like "The Anarchist Roots of Geography" which I'm trying to find the pdf for. The book details the history of anarchism in geography, talks about the need for Public Space in radical democracy, and the importance of agonism (versus antagonism) and integralism. He also makes some criticisms of David Harvey's statism.

If you want other essays by him, you might want to look up "Fuck Neoliberalism" and "Why a Radical Geography Must Be Anarchist." (Neither of which are great book club picks because they're short essays, but it's to give a glimpse into the kind of work he does)

Speaking of Harvey, I'd recommend his "A Brief History of Neoliberalism."

5

leftous wrote

Oh Id love to read more of Springer's work. This is the book you were referring to: https://www.academia.edu/8352688/The_Anarchist_Roots_of_Geography_Toward_Spatial_Emancipation

I only recently heard about him after that hack article attacking him, and read "Fuck Neoliberalism". Good shit.

5

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I gave reading it a try recently and had a hard time staying interested, personally. I've put up a temporary download link here for anybody who doesn't want to deal with academia.edu. First time doing that so let me know if works fine.

There are a handful of other texts by Springer available here: http://aaaaarg.fail/maker/53109593334fe0726920bcfe

We can coordinate getting them to whoever needs them, if people want to read any.

4

Malle_Yeno wrote

This is probably a stupid question, but how do I get files from your second link (the aaaaarg.fail one)? I see a few other works that I think a friend might be interested in.

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

It isn't a stupid question!

There's loads of stuff on aaaaarg, which is an invite-only community. As things stand, u/tnstaec has offered here to forward invites. You'll probably want to PM them with a safe email address for an invite. They aren't online all that often but it should work out?

4

leftous wrote

Actually looks like the academia.edu doesn't have the full text available for free. =_=

Your riseup link also seems to be down

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I've tried it on Tor and with a VPN and both seem to work fine, I'm not sure why it isn't working for you. But maybe I have no idea what I'm doing. Hm.

Clicking the link should send you to a green-backgrounded page with bird silhouettes and the word "Downloading" after a couple words pass, there should be a button at the bottom left saying "Download" that you can click.

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leftous wrote

My bad, I block scripts by default and it required a script to load. It works now that I allowed it. Thanks!

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I've been unable to find the Bookchin book in my usual bookfinding spots. Do you have a link?

4

Malle_Yeno wrote

I don't have a link, and can't seem to find a pdf either. If push comes to shove, I can scan a copy of the book and make a pdf.

5

amongstclouds wrote

Possibly too late, but for later reccomendations: Society of the Spectacle, The Unique and it's Property, The Revolution of Everyday Life, Desert, and Settlers. 💜

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

We can add them to the list for the next week!

Quite brazen of you; Unique is a pretty big book.

5

amongstclouds wrote

I've read it five times haha. Both translations with the newer one being the best and most concise.

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I honestly haven't expected I'd ever read it. The only thing I've really understood egoism to be is a kind of consciously self-first anti-reification theory. Nobody's really explained it in a way that's made it seem more than that to me, and I'm already into non-reification via poststructuralism. It'd be interesting to finally have some closure on what it is Stirner filled all those pages with, though.

Your comments more than welcome.

4

amongstclouds wrote

Also majority of The Unique book is hilarious. He was openly mocking Hegel and dialectics itself at times.

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amongstclouds wrote (edited )

Tbh, just read Stirners Critics. It's a much more concise breakdown of what Stirner meant written in response obviously to his critics at the time. :)

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Instead of the Unique? You're giving me a lot of reading here!

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amongstclouds wrote (edited )

I have links for days pertaining to better understanding just what Stirner was talking about. I usually tell people to read Stirners Critics before AND after reading the Unique book.

But even just reading Stirners Critics gives a great breakdown.

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote

Haha, you're probably going to have to rally the voters to vote for those because I suspect I won't manage to get to them under other likely circumstances.

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amongstclouds wrote

So much to read and so little time. Haha!

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote

Ain't that the truth.

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amongstclouds wrote

I still have a lot of Foucault and Deleuze to read. The latter scares me a bit. :s

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Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

I enjoy reading Deleuze, he can be pretty tough nut to crack though.

Mostly I think his (ethico-)metaphysics is gamechanging. Philosophy of difference is so cool. I'm yet to find anything better there, but I'm keeping an eye out.

5

RosaReborn wrote

I am definitely committed to whatever text we decide. I am solely a fiction reader so I want to diversify and add some lefty non-fiction, unfortunately I don't have any good suggestions besides some cornerstone classics which I haven't read yet. Perhaps we layout a schedule, rotating things like anti-capital, history/anti-colonialism, ecology, modern politics etc.

Personally I wouldn't mind by starting with the basics, Conquest of Bread, Homage to Catalonia etc. but if people have already read those then going right into things no one has yet read.

4

jadedctrl wrote

Hmm… We'll, we've already got a few non-fiction books, so I'll suggest this: The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin. Apparently, it's a semi-utopian anarchist novel. You can download copies of the e-book here.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

It's a great book, and it's possible to get an audio version of it (along with several other books, from the pirate bay), but it is a big time commitment - the audiobook is 13.5 hours.

4

selver wrote

I'm down for any of Tequila's suggestions.

I can't think of too many short essays right now, maybe some Kevin Carson? Been meaning to reread The Iron Fist behind the Invisible Hand.

2

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'd love it if you made a post explaining what you see in Kevin Carson.

C4SS, "left market anarchism" and mutualism all feel like they're missing the boat to me. But maybe they aren't what I think they are.

3

selver wrote (edited )

Honestly I haven't read all that much from them, but I like the few authors from there that I do read (Carson, Gillis, Wilbur, etc.). I like the way they conceptualize capitalism and the challenges they pose to communists/socialists.

They tend to be more ruthless about the State than many other anarchists. Since they don't blame the market for capitalism they do a good job showing the ways the State is used to create economic privilege for the ruling class, whereas other anarchists can be a bit too forgiving of the state for the sake of anti-capitalism. For example when it comes to regulation.

I think they are generally good at pushing leftists to clarify what they are actually against, and what their form of social/economic organization would practically look like, for example plenty of leftists are content with saying money=capitalism=bad without separating them and explaining what's actually wrong with money, without vague mystifications. They also criticize social capital & collectivism, which are often ignored or even praised by communists. Ie. the tendency to assume numbers/money is bad, human community & informal relationships good, as if the latter doesn't have it's own, arguably worse, problems when it comes to power dynamics.

In general I like them as a challenge to my other influences, especially the other post-left folk.

edit: Also, they completely dismantle the arguments of capitalists better than leftists can, since they are more familiar with market-focused arguments. Ie. demonstrating how right-wingers, ancaps, etc. are in reality anti-competition & anti-market. Whereas leftists tend to get hung up on the definition of capitalism, and thus just talk past capitalists. I have only successfully gotten through to pro-capitalists since reading free-market anarchists.

2

Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

Cool, I appreciate this answer!

Seems like it would be an interesting read. I could always use some sharpening up of those arguments.

2

Tequila_Wolf wrote

New suggestions:

Against Innocence: Race, Gender, & The Politics of Safety - Jackie Wang
Zine available from anarchist audio distro with audio version (1hr21mins), short and definitely worth the read.

The Word For World Is Forest - Ursula Le Guin
Is a novella, one of her better books and short for one (the audiobook is 3 hours), and available from the pirate bay to download. Deals with colonial themes in some quite interesting ways.