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4

surreal wrote

i like this even though i don't fully understand it. like what exactly is 'bicameral'? need to do more meaningful reading.

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amongstclouds wrote (edited )

The basic gist of the theory is that, early humans had developed an 'inner voice' in our head that allows us to form language and critical thinking.

Early humans had no idea what this voice was and assumed it came from outside of themselves. This voice is then presented in the form of 'higher beings'. According to the theory, the dynamic both aided the development of intelligence and reasoning skills, and also explains the importance of religion and spiritual practices in human society.

I personally love the theory and think about it quite a lot in relation to the sudden explosion of domestication by humans around 9000 years ago -- however ignorant it's analysis maybe have been.

PDF Also the wiki article is great.

2

amongstclouds wrote

This 'inner voice' is of course our own conscious thoughts, but how else would early humans know how to explain their own growing sense of agency and critical autonomy?

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rot wrote

this is really interesting

1

rot wrote

the timeline seems weird though. You would assume that after writing systems and nation states developed humans would no longer hear voices like that as they would already be used to thinking to themselves

1

amongstclouds wrote

There is a big time gap between the development of writing and the creation of 'nation state,' the latter of which is a rather fresh creation. About 6000 years between the two.

Seeing as the theory posits the 'breakdown of the bicameral mind,' there was almost 200,000 years of time passing by before this change occurred. Consciousness is a really weird thing that can't be properly pinned down. Even today you'll find thousands of different theories.

2

Tequila_Wolf wrote

This was written by the south african green anarchist Aragorn, if anybody is interested.