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ziq wrote (edited )

Damn fine praxis, teaching people to be self sufficient and respect the natural world.

Does scouting emphasize collectivist or individualistic traits? You say they're expected to cook their own food, but is it just a couple of kids shouldering all the work for the others, or is each kid really expected to be truly self sufficient and autonomous?

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IamaScoutAMA wrote

Our ideal is to turn children into autonomous and fulfilled adults. The group is a tool to make the individual grow. I personally think the group feeds on individual and vice-versa.

teams have mixed age/competence: there is older one that will do more work than the others, but we try to have them teach the younger ones. Also we give more responsibilities and autonomy to the "good" scouts. By the time the younger kids are old, they are the ones teaching the others.

Another tool is that we can set up a contract between the child and the group in which they decide to learn something by doing something for the group; for example learning knots by making a poster about knots that we can hang up in the group's room; or for a 8-12yo to learn how to speak in front of crowds by organizing a game of soccer and explaining the rules to everyone.

As for the cooking, each team has their own way of doing things: one team did all chores all together, another had a different member do all the chores each day. One team had half the members do the cooking, half do the dishes. Another team chose with a dice roll... Most of the time the kids find some sort of equality without our input.

3

ziq wrote (edited )

This is all great. We need anarcho-scouts, but it sounds like it's already running pretty anarchically in its current form.