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Death to the Gregorian calendar-- this one's much more rad en.wikipedia.org

Submitted by jadedctrl in lobby (edited )

Not sure what else to but this beautiful thing, so I guess /f/lobby is where it'll be.

TL;DR this calendar:

  • It works on an 4/5/4 week system
  • (It alternates between 4-week months and 5-week months)
  • Thus it alternates between 28-day months and 35-day months
  • Each month always starts on a Monday
  • (Thus holidays, birthdays, etc. are always on the same week-day)
  • The four quarters of the year are all equal-day and eqal-week
  • Leap year happens every six years
  • (Leap year just turns December, a four-week month, into a five-week month)

Comments

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3

indi wrote

I like the idea of the "leap week" being a week-long holiday when it happens. Once every five years, the entire world goes on a 7-day long, full-on, no-holds-barred bender of drink, drugs, dancing, dirtysex, and drugs, making spring break or the two-four weekend look like an afternoon tea party.

I'm in. Oh, and the fact that the math works out nicely is kinda cool, too.

1

Nonbinary_R_Us wrote

Service industry workers around the world tremble in dread

2

indi wrote

If your bender is striking fear into the hearts of service industry workers, you're doing it wrong.

If your bender is striking fear into the hearts of authorities, authoritarians, establishment voices, religious leaders, and right-wingers in general, you're doing it right.

2

sudo wrote

This looks pretty good - it's much easier to remember than the 30, 31, 28, and occasionally 29 day months of the Gregorian calendar. The only downside I can see for this calendar would be that a month would vary in length much more than in the Gregorian calendar. With the Gregorian calendar, months vary at most by 3 days, so most people think of a month as 30 ± 2 days, which is a fairly standard amount of time. With Symmetry454, however, a month varies at most by 7 days, which is a bit too much variation to still consider a month to be a standard amount of time.

Plus, there's the problem of switching all calendars in the world over to this one. Switching from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar took the entire world about 500 years to do completely, so for a while people would have to say things like "October 25 (November 7, New Style)", which was a giant pain. In programming, there are many different ways to write code (indentation with tabs or spaces, Allman-style braces or braces on the same line, etc.). If I am pair programming with someone else, I'll argue for what style we should program in before we start. But, it's important that we pick one style and stick to it, because a program written in a style I don't like is much better than an inconsistent program written in 2 different styles (half tabs, half spaces, or inconsistent brace placement, etc.). The same applies here - it's much better for the world to use one flawed calendar than for half the countries to use a flawed calendar, and half the countries to use a good one.

So, for any serious proposal to change to this calendar to work (and not make things worse by forcing people to translate dates all the time), it would require all countries in the world to agree to switch to this calendar.

2

jadedctrl wrote (edited )

With Symmetry454, however, a month varies at most by 7 days, which is a bit too much variation to still consider a month to be a standard amount of time.

I hadn't even thought of that, that's a really good point!

Switching to "weeks" or saying "4-month/5-month" or something could be an alternative. Or maybe just keep saying "month" as a measurement while accepting the increased ambiguity that comes with it.
Yea, that's probably the biggest problem inherent with the calendar itself (other than even less overlap with lunar months, I guess-- not that lunar months matter).

Plus, there's the problem of switching all calendars in the world over to this one. [...] If I am pair programming with someone else, I'll argue for what style we should program in before we start. But, it's important that we pick one style and stick to it, because a program written in a style I don't like is much better than an inconsistent program written in 2 different styles (half tabs, half spaces, or inconsistent brace placement, etc.)

It'd be basically the same here. When in Rome, do as the Romans do, so to speak. (Er, not literally, let's not go back to Julian...) Much like if you're talking to people in the USA using imperial or MM-DD-YYYY format, you'd accomodate for people in countries using the opposite calendar. You decide with people you communicate what indentation to use, and you decide with people which calendar to use (unless it's implied by where they live geographically). If you're in country X that uses Gregorian and you're there, you use Gregorian unless otherwise specified, much like how you use MM-DD/DD-MM depending on where you are, unless otherwise specified.
The difference would only matter during intercommunication between countries, and not really in day-to-day, local communication. Yea, if you're writing something you want everyone to understand, no matter what corner of the globe, you'd have to translate or specify you're using Sym454. But you'd also have to translate into UTC or specify your time-zone, or translate into metric, or do any number of related considerations.
It wouldn't be a terrible inconvenience, at least in comparison-- it'd just be another one in the stack, you know?

1

DataPacRat wrote

I'm rather fond of the Tranquility Calendar, myself.

1

jadedctrl wrote

That looks pretty nice-- I like the root on "Houston, Tranquility Base Here. The Eagle Has Landed" and the equal-day months, but the 13-month system makes it impossible to split the year nicely by months... you have to use weeks. That's just weird and annoying, really. And the leap-day "outside" of the months? A tad weird.