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tucc wrote

My landlord just bought a new tesla. It feels good to know that the money I send off to him every month contributes to such an honorable cause.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Everytime I eat a plant and there are seeds it just seems so strange not to plant them in the ground.

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FuckCopyright wrote

I've heard that apple seeds can't be replanted or something. I've had a date after my university ran a global week fair, but I regretfully disposed of the date seed (didn't know if I could plant it and I was rather preoccupied with studies).

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toocats wrote

Most fruit trees are actually grafts. You can grow an apple tree from an apple seed from an apple you ate, but it won't grow the same kind of tree that grew the apple you had. It'll grow wild apples (that aren't generally considered palatable).

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ziq wrote (edited )

that's only true if you live where crabapples grow wild.

Where I live there are only dessert apples so both parents of a seed will be good apples. I planted a seed I got from an anna apple I grew and the apples from the seedling are a little smaller but still delicious.

if you do end up with a sour apple, just use it for cider

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masque wrote

How long did it take to go from a seed to actually having apples?

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ziq wrote

3 years

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masque wrote

Wow, that's a lot faster than I expected.

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ziq wrote

it grew in the ground as a volunteer, so there was no transplant shock that would stunt its growth which happens with potted trees

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masque wrote (edited )

I should pretend that my surprise was due to some sort of past experience with potted trees and not due to the vague idea that "trees are big and probably grow slowly."

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Majrelende OP wrote (edited )

As far as I have read, apples are somewhat of an exception— I had tried to sprout the core of a plum (which was overtaken with mould) and read that it can take ten years to fruit.

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ziq wrote

I also have several loquat seedlings that fruited after 3 years, and a nectarine. On the other hand, I have 7 year old avocado seedlings that have yet to set fruit.

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tucc wrote

I tried to plant the seeds from a butternut squash I ate but the seeds never sprouted :(

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I hate my roommates. Like, a lot.

Fortunately, I'm only stuck with them till the 7th.

Too bad early withdrawal from housing incurs a fee of $300. College housing is fucking garbage.

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TLBM wrote (edited )

Where are you going to live after that? Will you have new roommates?

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SomeIconoclast wrote

I'm transferring schools; going to one that's closer to home. It'll come with a whole new set of challenges that I would have had to face anyway, but at least I'll be around a group of people that I'm actually fond of. Last semester, two of these guys kept me up for around 2 hours because they kept talking about about trans people being mentally ill and these walls are thin. The casual homophobia and ableism soured whatever impressions I initially had of them, too.

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Grace wrote

How do people not fall in love with every girl they meet? They're all just so pretty, ah the life of a lonely transbian.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I have to like someone to fall for them, so there's a buffer that excludes pretty much anybody who isn't an anarchist.

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Majrelende OP wrote (edited )

They might be aromantic, or whoever they see may have a terrible personality or beliefs in their opinion.

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Grace wrote

Yeah, i just love how pretty so many girls are

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existential1 wrote

I have no idea what I'm doing in so many aspects of life, yet I'm uncontent with what I have.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

u/black_fox where'd you find out about anarchistlibraries.net? Also, why do you think it's better than the regular library?

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black_fox wrote

clouds i think. i think it’s better because it includes many anarchist library projects and not just one English language one, basically making it a more comprehensive search.

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Majrelende OP wrote (edited )

With winter’s grip loosening, I had decided to start reading more about gardening, so I started Fukuoka’s The Natural Way of Farming. So far, it reads like a long-winded rant.

Seasons pass so quickly once they are almost over.

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existential1 wrote

I love all his stuff. But yes, he is a big rant and hot take kinda guy in his own way. But his rant is towards a more nature-first approach that doesn't accept science as the basis for all knowledge or the primary means of deriving truth.

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bloodrose wrote

Spring is here and we didn't get our winter rains. I noticed the wild mustard growing yesterday. So tomorrow, I'm going to drag my family to a field I know doesn't get sprayed so we can go pick the wild mustard greens. Anyone have ideas for how to cook mustard greens? I was just going to throw them in a smoothie but that feels silly.

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Dumai wrote

having to explain to people why the kibbutzim were bad, actually, reminds me of my dad's take that the only time "socialism" has ever worked was when israel did it

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Why were the kibbutzim bad? Just that they were made by Israel or other things too?

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Dumai wrote

they basically functioned as a means of colonial expropriation both before the founding of the state of israel and after. "return to the soil" (in both senses of the term), place the roots for an agricultural labour force with control over the land. ended up being an important part of the nation-building project, post-1948 you just get stories of israel levelling or depopulating palestinian villages and building kibbutzim where they used to be

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Thank you!

Do you know a good text I could read about this?

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Dumai wrote (edited )

nothin' about the kibbutzim specifically off the top of my head but ilan pappe's 'the ethnic cleansing of palestine' will have some relevant stuff and it might interest u anyway

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Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

Thanks! I'll have a look when I get a chance.

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FuckCopyright wrote

Stomach ache because I've had a couple of strong beers (left with almost no money since I have no source of income - spent most of it on some electronics and some game engine asset to help speed up development for studies). I feel like I deserve to be hurt by alcohol poisoning though.

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bloodrose wrote

Please drink some water. You do not deserve to be hurt. hugs

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Does anybody know of an anarchist critique of economics as a whole? So far as I've been, the discipline is basically rooted in a whole bunch of assumptions that are completely horseshit. I'd love to read more on this so I can properly uh, engage, some economists I've been seeing around.

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onymous wrote

Enemy Combatant had one I remember really liking. It had "Economics" in the title I think. Can't load the Little Black Cart website to look though :/

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

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lastfutures wrote (edited )

I've got one called Too Much of Nothing: An Anthology of Anti-Economic Thought from LBC, it's an Enemy Combatant title. Starts with a ~35 page intro/essay by Birdie Joe Hoakes, then has the following essays:

Sumerian Economics by PLW

Money and Logos by M.D.P

The Price of an Entire World by Massimo Passamani - Not sure if it's what you're looking for, but I liked this one quite a bit

Counterfeiting Sovereignty: Why the State Jealously Guards it's Currency by Don LaCoss

Property and the Unique One

And then in the back there is this list of further reading.

The other anti-economic thing from LBC was the stuff by Jean-Pierre Voyer who was a post-situationist that critiqued Marx and Debord for not going far enough and critiquing political economy itself. Can't really say if his stuff's any good, but the little I have read seems interesting.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Thanks! I'm bummed to see it's not available free at the usual places. Ordering from LBC isn't super convenient this side of the world.

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lastfutures wrote

I looked over the text again. The author comes from an egoist perspective, but brings in other interesting sources as well. I'll try and scan the essay for you sometime soon.

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lastfutures wrote

You might be able to find the other listed essays online somewhere, I haven't checked.

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onymous wrote

Oh that's it that's the one!! Gotta reread/finish reading this now.

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onymous wrote

Nope, although actually that looks kind of amazing...?!

Argh! I don't even know what the essays in it were called, I just remember a green humanoid stenciling on the cover.

I'll update when I find it. This is gonna bug me.

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TLBM wrote

Debt: the first 5000 years, by David graeber? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debt:_The_First_5000_Years

Also, Isn't anprim litterature full of critiques of economics?

Finally, An anarchists FAQ has a few paragraphs on economics. http://anarchism.pageabode.com/afaq/secCcon.html

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Debt: the first 5000 years, by David graeber? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debt:_The_First_5000_Years

This is a bit bigger at texts than I'm going for. Also, based on the page you linked, this is the gist of the critique:

The author claims that debt and credit historically appeared before money, which itself appeared before barter. This is the opposite of the narrative given in standard economics texts dating back to Adam Smith. To support this, he cites numerous historical, ethnographic and archaeological studies. He also claims that the standard economics texts cite no evidence for suggesting that barter came before money, credit and debt, and he has seen no credible reports suggesting such.

But I'm looking for more than some historical claims.

Also, Isn't anprim litterature full of critiques of economics?

I don't know.

Finally, An anarchists FAQ has a few paragraphs on economics. http://anarchism.pageabode.com/afaq/secCcon.html

This looks promising, I will give it a shot when I can. Thanks!

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