[deleted]

Submitted by [deleted] in lobby (edited )

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black_fox wrote

how do they talk about Taiwan, or how is it viewed in the PRC?

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greentea wrote

An anecdote of possible relation: I seem to remember that a few years ago, if you ordered something on Taobao (Chinese amazon) to Taiwan, you had the option to choose "Taiwan" or "Chinese Taipei" as choice of delivery. If you chose the former it was drastically cheaper, as incentive to get Taiwanese people to identify with PRC.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

If you chose the former

Do you mean latter instead of former? Either that or I don't know the significance of the names at all.

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D_Sapph_23 wrote

  1. What kind of Racism do you find in the Mainland?
  2. What are your personal views on the Falun Gong
  3. Are you part of the Social Credit system because according to state propaganda it should be active by now
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greentea wrote

I hope it's ok if I butt in! I've spent the last five years in and out of China, so very interested in this topic!

One one: I agree with Deathdirge about Han chauvinism. I think there's also a bunch of other layers of racism. One source is seen in advertising and media (Wolf Warrior II, that ad where a black man becomes light skinned in the wash are some examples, almost every teen movie I've seen that has a muscle black man who chases the protagonist). I've encountered a lot of hate towards blackness from people on the streets outside big famous city centres. Most Africans I have met outside say Beijing have told me about experiences of verbal and physical harassment. On Chinese forums, I have also widely seen the sentiment that since China gives so much aid to Africa, it should at least benefit from being a colonial power. I think the politically correct narrative is against racism, but I think China is very anti-black. I have also seen an eviction notice targeted only at Africans and seen loads of job ads that specify they're for whites only (I think there are more examples but my mind is a little fuzzy now). On three: There's increasingly been a movement to make sure foreigners also will be affected by social credit. This is primarily being applied to foreign teachers. Also, when I was in China last year, I noticed I - not a teacher - had a Sesame credit score on my Alipay. I think even though its not state owned, it still counts as social credit, because it calculates the score based on criteria that include your online behaviour, social networks, etc.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Thanks for this, it's fucking interesting.

Your conversations are never private.

Including at home?

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[deleted] wrote

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mofongo wrote

I understand why the cover won't prevent recordings, but did you see any clue on your phone that recording were being made, like new files or something?

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[deleted] wrote

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enforcedcompliance wrote

The thread is about China. No one is really saying 'this doesn't happen in the West'.

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cronal wrote

I tried to remove my post after noticing I was replying to the OP.

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LateRevolt wrote

Can you tell us about these aspects that impressed you? Is it true that white people are commonly seem as somewhat superior? What did people think Russia or the Soviet Union? What about third world countries?

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[deleted] wrote

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_caspar_ wrote

also interested in your experience, as I was in Beijing for awhile a few years ago. being white, I was asked a handful of times by strangers if they could take photos with me to post on their social media feed, which I politely declined. I was told by my friend (who is from there and I was hanging with most of the time) that because of the rarity of westerners, its a thing people post to their wechat: a "look what I ran into today!" kind of thing.

I myself never experienced any medical care, but another friend (not chinese) had to go to the hospital while there, and also said it was wildly efficient and cheap. when they took her blood sample, she stuck her arm through a small door in the wall and bam! all tests were done super fast.

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[deleted] wrote

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_caspar_ wrote

yeah, I would see a couple westerners maybe every other day, but mostly around tourist areas. maybe it was more to show off to friends on wechat, cause those asking were pretty young, teens/20s, ha I dont know.

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n_n wrote (edited )

Also I'm interested in their opinions on Vietnam and the past war with them and their opinions on the Soviet Union after the Sino-Soviet split and its fall.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Have you read the Chuang journals? How'd you like them if you did?

Meme in relation to that.

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_caspar_ wrote

great thread. some things I witnessed during my short time in Beijing:

studied for a bit with an art department at a highly respected univ. there, where most of the pedagogy (unsurprisingly) is highly processed based, traditional, not very experimental, and definitely not discussing politics, although there were some younger faculty there that were trying their best to change that. many of the galleries around the city where very similar to what you see in western cities, some works and artists being quite critical, but very implicitly, similar to the small budget films that get made there. many of the students we met didnt drink alcohol or go out much, save for a few. none I had talked to had ever smoked or even seen pot. again, probably not all that surprising, but quite different than your average western art school : ] use of vpns seemed to be fairly abundant, and alot more content is available online than I initially thought, its mostly the large platforms that are blocked (youtube, google, etc), so it becomes a matter of knowing where to look without a search engine.

the wildest thing I saw was probably exploring the outskirts, which is basically an ever expanding ring of city growth, where theres a zone just for construction workers who live there for a number of years until construction is complete, then keeps moving outward. the buildings in this zone really just look like concrete boxes, hardly any stores save for basic things, and food vendors. not hard to imagine, but the scale of it is terrifying.

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MHC wrote

I am outside China, but sometimes meet brainwashed Chinese. How can one resist the nationalism they exude?

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[deleted] wrote

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MHC wrote

I remember a socialist part lecture at a university. Young male Chinese people dominated the audience!

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cronal wrote (edited )

I'm curious about those labor camps... If there are like 15-20 of these camps in a city, then how these are like?

Difference to prisons in, say, the US? Or are these like enclosed buildings where people are thrown to not be ever seen again, and nobody really knows what's happening in there?

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[deleted] wrote

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cronal wrote

Thanks. Kinda what I was expecting from such a terrible regime.

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tremulo wrote (edited )

Ironically... this reads like a regime that most of the regulars of this site would get 120% behind!

If only it'd be more trans-supportive.

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ziq wrote

i don't think you understand the audience for this site

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enforcedcompliance wrote

What are you talking about? They got banned for blatant transphobia so we're basically an authoritarian regime and they should be lucky we're not sending them to a work ca-- I mean re-education center.

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