Comments

You must log in or register to comment.

4

Cheeks wrote

If you aren't already familiar with html, css, and Javascript, start there. Then you can move on to more advanced languages and concepts. HOW TO THINK LIKE A COMPUTER SCIENTIST, is my typical go to suggestion.

http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/

1

surreal wrote

that book can be too mathy at some parts

1

Cheeks wrote

Well of course, math logic, but not computation. Math logic is just a fundamental part of programming. I'm a high school dropout and horrendously bad at math, specifically computation, but the logic is simple enough to wrap my head around.

2

surreal wrote

I'm a high school dropout and horrendously bad at math, specifically computation

we are not so different, programming made me learn math not the other way around.

i love that book btw

4

jorgesumle wrote

You can read Introduction to programming with Emacs Lisp and you'll also learn how to use an advanced text editor.

-1

Copenhagen_Bram wrote (edited )

advanced text editor

What does Vim have to do with emacs lisp?

edit: whaaah i got downvoted by church of emacs quacks. Someday you shall all pray for mercy to the editor of the beast whose number is vi vi vi.

ah who am i kidding spacemacs is cool

3

selver wrote

Well, what do you want to learn how to do?

1

noordinaryspider wrote

There is no purpose in this endeavor whatsoever other than hoping that I will have greater appreciation for the work of others and that it's a far better use of my time than some of my current leisure activities.

4

selver wrote (edited )

I'd go with /u/Cheeks suggestion then, Python is a great place to start. Very readable syntax, but widely used.

edit: Personally I'd skip the html, css, javascript, unless you want to do web development.

2

jadedctrl wrote (edited )

You should start with Python— it's pretty simple, cuts out of the BS a lot of languages have, and is super-popular, so there's a huge amount of docs/questions online from other beginners if you need it.

I liked Learn Python the Hard Way (here's the PDF)— it really teaches you the language, and takes only about 20 minutes a day (eh, or whenever you have the time).

It doesn't get mathy at all. :D

-1

5_0_4_1_5_8_7 wrote (edited )

It's good but it's not quite right, as the sayin' goes.

First of all use JetBrains and subscribe to talk-python :D

2nd, set up a trello-board or two to track progress and stuff & use dpaste if things go off the page.

At this point you'll be slightly perplexed - but that where subreddits and books come into play ;-)

If you need a hero; Fabrice Bellard is your guy for this year.

Also if you do use freecodecamp.org you shall need to get an anonymous non-geographical github account.

.......

After that, and it is a weekend thing - I would try Alison courses to brush-up on other skills.

Oh and bookmark everything (online)!

perhaps just bookmark linuxjourney (today) and build it up over the course of a season or two.

2

TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote

scheme is simple af (Also cool and not much to remember) but doesn't have that much available resources neither does it have that much real life applications

2

surreal wrote

neither does it have that much real life applications

over there at GNU they love scheme. Guile is pretty much all over their projects. Also the init system of their distro is written in scheme!

0

365degrees wrote

Audacity and GIMP (and also the proprietary AutoCAD, lol) use Lisps as scripting languages.

1

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I'm late to the party. The Racket language is a form of Scheme, and it's got a fair bit of educational materials. The language creators are trying to make it more widely used, but it's not that popular (yet?)

http://racket-lang.org/

I also like GUILE Scheme, which surreal referenced below. But I don't think the introductory material is as newbie-friendly as for Racket.

1

TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote

racket is cool af, I'm currently learning scheme (and programming) thanks to them. Let's hope I persist!

2

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I pay my bills working on Java, but my two favorite languages are Racket and Perl6. I'm not especially good at either, though. I just love the features and syntax for both, even though they're quite different from each other.

Best of luck to you.

1

Cheeks wrote

I've been thinking this over and talked to a couple of friends that I had learned with or had helped learn to program. One of them pointed out a Harvard class we audited together as they had recorded and posted the entire class on youtube.

They class is centered around c and c++ but it was fun and tied a lot of the different languages together and introduces different methodologies, OOP, Functional. A cursory search yielded an edux version of the class so it's now offered as open courseware. Harvard cs50.

1

anarchyinwaitawhile wrote (edited )

I would recommend Ada. It is had a strong, static, and strick type system, it is also very verbose and easy to read. I have spent the last 25 years teaching myself programming languages, C, C++, Pascal, and more, I still believe Ada is the best. There is also GNAT which makes Ada somewhat more accessible.

Ada Programming on Wikibooks provides a good introduction.

Programming in Ada by John Barnes (2012) It skips the newbie stuff—unfortunately anything, Ada does :-(

1

365degrees wrote

The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs is an infamous MIT textbook from 1979 for the course they ran. It's about the dead simple Scheme language. It doesn't talk about much math they don't explain first, and most of it is just to teach developing concepts and methods for prototyping instead of the math itself.

1

surreal wrote

Python all the way, it's the easiest high level language. Download a headfirst python book from TPB, codeacademy used to be nice with an interactive tutorial but most stuff are behind paywalls now. And of course the official tutorial which isn't very mathy but its geeky.