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7

Tequila_Wolf wrote

Unfortunately I haven't made the jump to Linux. I'd like to but it's not currently near the top of my priority list.

7

dele_ted wrote

It's much easier than you might think. Take a look at KDE Neon, my preferred distro, if you want a somewhat easy introduction with lots of room for customization and expansion.

5

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I've installed linux on computers before. Just the emotional energy involved in

  • figuring out which linux I'd want
  • downloading it
  • getting an external drive to put my data on during the interim
  • moving all my files onto an external
  • installing linux
  • downloading and replacing important programs/extensions I need after figuring out which to download where there isn't an equivalent on linux
  • figuring out some basics and troubleshooting some inevitable noob issues

is quite a lot for me.

7

dele_ted wrote

I play some proprietary software games every now and then on my desktop PC at home, running Windows. I don't like it, but i do enjoy playing some games to relax after a tough day.

I run KDE Neon alongside Windows and use that for anything else. My laptop runs KDE Neon too.

7

christobal wrote

My thin client at work.

Besides that I havent left linux for years now.

6

Fossidarity wrote

All the time during work, I'm dying inside a tiny bit every day.

5

art wrote

When I print at the local library those computers and printing kiosks use Windows 7. That's about it unless I'm doing repairs for a friend or family member.

5

selver wrote

Haven't used them in years. Maybe once or twice when I fucked up my laptop and had to download a new iso on someone else's computer.

5

r4tch3t wrote

Most of the time, unfortunately. I have a few things that I just can't translate over to my copy of Debian from Windows.

5

bea wrote (edited )

A few times a month. Mostly when I need to do something and I'm near my dad's laptop or when I want to play games on my desktop (I still haven't got around to installing GNU/Linux onto it, since it gets used only for gaming and is useless for most other stuff)

Edit: I misread the question, sorry.

I only have to use Windows when helping friends and relatives with computers but this happens only a few times a year.

5

ziq wrote

Only when I have to fix something at work. I insist my relatives run linux if they want me to provide tech support.

4

xxi wrote (edited )

At home? Never. If I can't run some piece of software on Debian I rather do other stuff. It's sort of like food places not serving vegetarian/vegan meals or someone using racial slurs, my reaction to that is pretty much "Fuck you." While helping others? When that need arises, I'd say once a month at most.

I saw someone saying that migrating to Linux is cumbersome. Funny thing is that I switched because I felt Windows was too cumbersome to use and I assure you that I'm not trying to exaggerate.

I'm not an hacker by any means, but changing/modifying stuff on Windows is horrible. The reason is that every time you want to do something that Microsoft doesn't want you to change — take theme changes — you either have to rely on stuff that they, or some "sanction vendor" provide. If you want to break away from that you have to rely on workarounds that various independent Windows communities provide. Windows 7 for example didn't really give you the option to remove window decoration in any sane manner. That's easily done in the DE Xfce for example and it's very user friendly.

Another thing is that it's hard to modify which software that run in the background or on startup sufficiently. For example, while testing something you might want to do a soft reboot, logout and login quickly or something like that. That takes like 10-20 seconds on Linux while Windows needs to do full reboots all the time for some reason. Apart from that: I can run my computer for a month without reboots even after installing a ton of new software. It's more or less common practice in Windows to reboot for all kinds of shitty reasons. My experience with MacOS is more or less the same.

With that said, sure it takes some time to get to learn the Linux system but it's not as exotic as it might appear. It sure beats trying to do a backflip while tying your shoe laces in mid-air or having to do workarounds on workarounds every time you need to do something slightly non-standard. Just trying to run low resource system on a shitty computer is more or less impossible on MacOS and Windows, they're clunky as hell. Doesn't matter which version all that I've had to deal with is just very, very cumbersome the moment you don't want to open just Word or a browser.

4

xxi wrote (edited )

And yeah, then there's the part where you don't have to rely capitalist entities to run a computer. Sure, you can use Google Chrome or iTunes if you want to but I very rarely find that it's necessary. I've set up Spotify when I've got people around and we need music, but I don't really use it in my day to day life.

4

TheDevilAndMrJones wrote

Way too often...

Look, I love FLOSS stuff. So much so, that I'm going to get a degree and learn how to program to aid other FLOSS programs. But it simply doesn't work on either of my machines.

On my (non-corebooted) T420, wireless won't work. I need to have wireless to work because, well, it's a laptop. And my college doesn't have just random eithernet ports around campus. WiFi's nice though...

Also, sometimes I just kinda like (read: tolerate) Windows? I do think 10 is the best version out there, since all Windows versions are proprietary and spy on you no matter what you try and do about it, so why not use the latest version, with a bunch of spiffy stuff on it?

Plus, I really like OneNote 2016, and soon coming ON2019. It's a gift from the heavens because I have a small defect in my arm, so I can't write for long periods, but typing doesn't hurt me for the same periods.

Do I like Windows (10 or any edition)? Nope. I can only tolerate it at best. But sometimes I just need something to work, and Windows does that for me at least.

3

bmrgould01 wrote

Pretty much always. Work on windows for most of what I do, some development is done through Linux though. While my gaming is mostly big competitive proprietary games. School is mostly windows, but good amount with Ubuntu.

2

zzuum wrote

I haven't used it in at least 4 years, but I might have to hop onto a campus computer to flash a firmware update to my Sony Xperia X Compact because I can't figure out the linux client. Lol

2

georgia wrote

I'm completely free of it at school thanks to virtualization but I have to use MS at work. It's kind of terrifying since I regularly handle social security numbers but I feel a bit better after downloading Firefox. I wanted to add noscript but I knew people would be super confused.