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4

ziq wrote

And Florida will be completely underwater, so don't expect to move production there. They're already spending a fortune pumping the seawater away to keep the state from sinking.

4

red_pepper wrote

I'm sure they picked strawberries for SEO reasons or something, but really they're the worse example because you can grow them anywhere. You can grow them in a windowsill even. I also highly suggest it - you may not get big berries, but they're intensely flavorful because you can pick them at the peak of ripeness.

It's almonds, wine grapes, walnuts, freestone peaches, and cherries that are more troublesome. Those take a long time to start producing and require much more space than strawberries. I grow wine grapes and live in a forest with all the walnuts I can eat, but there's no way I'll ever be able to grow almonds. The spirit of the title is still correct. In all likelihood, adapting to collapse is going to mean we just can't eat some foods anymore. These days of superabundance are just unsustainable, sadly.

4

ziq wrote (edited )

Where I'm from, strawberries can only grow under shade cloth. It's too hot otherwise. Same goes for tomatoes. And strawberries can only be grown in spring, by early summer no amount of shade cloth will stop them from shutting down.

4

red_pepper wrote

Yeah, being able to go get fresh strawberries any time of year whenever the craving strikes is going to be something we lose as well. Fresh foods will only be available a handful of weeks per year, and only in places they can be grown. That's been the norm for most of human history, but going back to that is going to be hard.