Submitted by Wafflecakescat in axolotl (edited )

I was at a Canadian department store where I may have concealed in the fitting room. The attendants were pretty on my case about the same amount of hangers not coming out.

I eventually was let go by them and went on the floor and dumped whatever I may have had. I saw a pretty obvious plain clothesed LP guy following me around. He was wearing grey sweatpants, a ball cap, and a grey hoodie. He was pretending to be on his phone but clearly was trailing me around.

He never approached me or apprehended me and I trusted my gut and dumped everything in case he did. Should I be in the clear? I ended up going to the rest of the mall and did other shopping and never saw him again outside of that department store. Passed tons of security guards and no incident. No one followed me to my car or got my plates.

I guess he was just trying to get me to dump? I should be fine?

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howtuffareyou wrote

LPs usually wait until you go near or pass the exit to catch you. They follow you around to see if you snatch anything.

They are really bad at it, but I think they do it purposely to warn you that they are on to you.

Anyway you’re good. Everything you said makes you sound clear

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GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

I don't know if there's a way to be good at hiding the fact that you're LP on the store floor.

It's pretty obvious they're not shoppers. They don't look like a normal customer that's searching for something specific. They wander around from department to department, with no purpose, pretending to be on the phone, and/or manhandling different, unrelated items, but with eyes elsewhere.

At one store where I worked, they didn't even make any effort to look undercover, even though they were in plain clothes. They just stood in some corner, leaning against the wall or some arch, and .... just people-watch. That had to be for deterrent purposes more than anything else.

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deeppurplehazedream wrote

That had to be for deterrent purposes more than anything else.

Hence the title Loss Prevention. It's also a lot more work, time, and expense to catch and prosecute. Remember you can always run for it, but have an escape plan if possible. Theoretically, of course.

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GoodOldWorkingClass wrote

It's also a lot more work, time, and expense to catch and prosecute

True! LP would have to take the time and go to court and testify as a witness on trial date. That's the only basis for a shoplifting case.

The real reason stores aren't keen on prosecuting though is that there's no big money in it for them. All they can be awarded by a court is loss cost which is pretty low and stores find it more convenient to just send the offender a civil demand letter for that amount (usually with a veiled but illegal threat of criminal prosecution). It's not like they're going after an insurance company for hundreds of thousands.

So yea, it makes more sense to prevent loss of merchandise in the first place. I don't buy some former LP's description of their job requirement: which was that they had to recover stolen goods in the amount of at least their hourly rate in order for their position to be justified. I don't think so. It doesn't quite work like that on the sales floor.

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