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Tequila_Wolf wrote

If somebody can link to articles around this, that would be great. Presently I am skeptical.

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Fossidarity wrote

Dietary source of vitamin B12 intake and vitamin B12 status in female elderly Koreans aged 85 and older living in rural area

On dietary source, 67.3% of dietary vitamin B12 was from meat, eggs and fishes and 30.6% was from plant foods, such as soybean-fermented foods, seaweeds, and kimchi.

Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

However, a fermented soybean-based food called tempe contains a considerable amount of Vitamin B12 (0.7–8.0 μg/100 g)

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In addition, high levels of Vitamin B12 were detected in the commercially available dried shiitake mushroom fruiting bodies (Lentinula edodes), which are used in various vegetarian dishes. The Vitamin B12 contents of dried shiitake mushroom fruiting bodies (100 g dry weight) significantly varied and the average Vitamin B12 value was approximately 5.61 μg

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Various types of edible algae are consumed worldwide as food sources. Dried green laver (Enteromorpha sp.) and purple laver (Porphyra sp.) are the most widely consumed edible algae, and they contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12 (approximately 63.6 μg/100 g dry weight and 32.3 μg/100 g dry weight, respectively)

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A nutritional analysis of six vegan children who had consumed vegan diets including brown rice and dried purple laver (nori) for 4–10 years suggested that the consumption of nori may prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in vegans

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Where is the B12 coming from in the tempeh though? Has to get cobalt from something.

I wonder about the mushrooms and algae and nori too. I doubt any of these foods are available where I live.

I've been told repeatedly that there are no plant sources of B12 outside of not washing the sand off your plants.

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Fossidarity wrote

The element has a medium abundance but natural compounds of cobalt are numerous and small amounts of cobalt compounds are found in most rocks, soils, plants, and animals.

Since B12 is measured in micrograms the bacteria probably don't need much of it. Even tobacco smoke contains cobalt.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote (edited )

Would be nice to have B12 in plant-based food here! I get pretty severe effects from deficiency.

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ziq OP wrote (edited )

If you already have a deficiency, you need treatment, not fortified foods.

Get methylcobalamin injections from a pharmacy. You can get them over the counter in most countries except the US, where they're illegal unless administered by a licensed practitioner.

Inject into your thighs (into a muscle) daily for a week and then monthly until you recover. Make sure to pull back on the needle slightly to make sure you didn't hit a vein. Choose a different injection site each time.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency - 1000 mcg of methylcobalamin injected intramuscularly once daily for up to ten days. Depression - 1 mg of methylcobalamin injected intramuscularly once per week for four weeks. Cognitive Function - 1000 mcg injected daily for five days, followed by a monthly injection of 1000 mcg for five months.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Yeah I've had to resort to that; luckily the symptoms have left.

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h4kn2 wrote

Why can't you just take a B12 supplement?

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