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5

GrimWillow wrote

I would dumpster or steal the food. You won't be very healthy on such short cash.

5

ziq wrote (edited )

Assuming it has to last a week?

A week's supply of buckwheat, mushrooms, sweetcorn, tomato paste, paprika, squash, aubergine, taro, cumin and tumeric. Put it all in a pressure cooker with water and set it to the rice setting plus 2 minutes.

1

mofongo wrote

I can't imagine how all that is tasty.

1

Copenhagen_Bram wrote

I think it sounds tasty.

Problem is I don't have a pressure cooker.

3

bloodrose wrote

If you don't have a pressure cooker, you can just cook in a large pot for a longer period of time.

1

noordinaryspider wrote

Those were very popular on WTM (homeschooling site) but I was hesitant because the recommendations were coming from upscale hipster types.

Now I do want one.

Just not enough to cook my kid and sell him to get the money,

;)

The recipe does look good, though, as does the thought of cooking once for a whole week without having to deal with freezing and grumpy kids complaining that we had that yesterday.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

First I'd reconceptualize that as $10 for the supermarket and $19 for the farmstand. If I lived in the city I'd say "produce section" instead of farmstand.

Depending on cooking equipment and facilities, I'd start with the $10 and get rice, flour, potatoes, legumes, etc. with that--something sustaining and nourishing that you can fill up on without worrying too much about running out. I'd do my very best to stay within budget but not beat myself up too much if I had to settle for $17 or $18 instead of the full $19 for the farmstand.

Okay, back in the car, drive, take deep breaths. I'd be polite but honest with the farmstand workers and try to time my trip to coincide with Market and when there would be a lot of leftovers that didn't sell. I'd crack a few jokes about how "Your chickens eat better than my kid!" but respect the farmstand's space and priorities.

If it was the produce section, I'd look at the "marked down for quick sale" bargain bin before even noticing what else was on sale or else check the dumpster first.

Cabbage and beets are usually more bang for the buck nutritionwise than designer hipster veggies. If the $29 was for just me for as long as possible, I'd take the "Meh. It's fuel for bodies, not entertainment" approach but if I were also responsible for small children, seniors, or romantic partner I'd probably say, "I'm not hungry." or "That looks stale." so I could get away with getting a dollar or fifty cents worth of some sort of treat or comfort food for my loved one.

This is assuming that the $29 didn't need to last longer than the produce would survive with the refrigeration/freezing devices that were available under the circumstances.

Obviously it wouldn't last anywhere near as long if you didn't have conventional (rental) housing and some knowledge of the area so this is just a general go-to idea. Meals are great if you do them, but I'm assuming crisis and "Can I have a food too if there is enough?" paradigm.

4

bloodrose wrote

How long does the $29 have to last? How many meals/day? What type of meals?

5

bloodrose wrote

Assuming at least a few days, if not a week:

$1 Rice $1 dry pinto beans $1 onion $1 garlic Cook the dry pinto beans with some onion and garlic (you'll have a ton left over). Cook the rice and mix in the beans. This is your base for quite a few meals.

$5 worth of fresh veggies - carrots, zucchini, corn is in season right now. Steam or cook with some of the leftover onion and garlic in a frying pan with water (or some oil if you have it). That's a lot of dinner and lunch and you still have $20 left. Throw in $1 worth of tortillas to make it into burittos.

$2 cabbage (again, cheap right now) and a $1 bottle of apple cider vinegar, $1 of sugar (unless you can get free sugar from coffee places). Shred a small amount of the cabbage and mix with some of the apple cider vinegar and sugar. Cole slaw and you still have sugar and vinegar left over. $5 potatoes. Bake the potatoes, mix your coleslaw in. This is quite a lot of lunches/dinner. You still have $10 left.

Breakfasts: oatmeal if you're not gluten intolerant is super cheap (like $1-$2). Add sliced bananas and peanut butter for another few dollars.

3

wild_liger wrote (edited )

Oats, Rice, Lentils, Bananas, and a fuck ton of vegetables, fresh or canned, whatever's handy and/or cheaper. Peanut butter, jelly, and bread for filling in the gaps when you don't have time to cook.

That plus last-chance $1 a dozen donuts are pretty much my fucking diet these days, plus whatever else I can scrounge up or mooch off of friends.

Edit: Thought this was on askraddle instead of vegan, maybe bread is a no-go then (or maybe not, I don't pay attention to the ingredients on the bread I buy), sorry about that. Likewise the donuts, unfortunately.

2

Copenhagen_Bram wrote

I hope all these amazing ideas aren't possible because you all live in some wonderful city where things are cheaper than they are here.

2

bloodrose wrote (edited )

My prices are based on a fairly expensive place to live (San Francisco Bay Area) but I don't know where you live so I don't know what prices are where you are.

But I'm also a pretty savvy shopper. I find Asian grocery stores are the cheapest produce and stores like grocery outlet are cheaper for dry goods. I shop at many, many stores.

3

Copenhagen_Bram wrote

I

  • shop at only two stores

  • am just learning how to shop

  • have to be driven by my caseworker if I want to go shopping, and probably can't use his kind services to just go exploring shops

  • we also have an aide who goes shopping for us, who bought me a bottle of house italian dressing (which has milk) from a store which also had plenty of bottles of normal italian dressing (which has no milk).

2

bloodrose wrote

Rice, beans and other dry goods will still be cheap. Your fresh vegetable prices may be higher if you're in a standard Safeway-type grocery store. You may need to get frozen or canned veggies. But a lot of the ideas in this thread are really cheap. :)

1

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

It's very old school, but Frankie Lappe's Diet for a Small Planet has some good info on shopping. The Farm cookbook is also very good for low budget and relatively easy. iirc, it doesn't assume a lot of experience--at the time it was written, a lot of adult men were starting with absolute zero experience after being shooed out of the kitchen for their entire childhoods. The writing isn't condescending, it just doesn't assume you already know a lot of complicated techniques.

I've got kids like that aide and my own set of mobility problems. What has worked best for me is to give them very specific instructions such as, "A bottle of Annie's brand Shiitake and Sesame flavoured salad dressing which is on the top shelf on the right hand side of Aisle 7", or if it was something very important like three bags of flour that had to get me through for a month while all the adult kids were out of town, I'd SMS a picture of the empty package while the kid was at the store.

Only two stores can definitely simplify things as far as keeping track of prices. I'll channel some Amy Dacyzyn (Tightwad Gazette) and veganized Jill Bond (Dinner's in the Freezer) for you when I get a chance. Can you access the stores' webpages or do you have a subscription to a newspaper that has the weekly ads, coupons, sales, etc.?

Great question to get people talking and brainstorming, btw.

1

Acererak wrote

At the surplus grocery store nearby that would get me a ton of rice and beans. Throw in a bottle of oil and a big jar of peanut butter. Would last several weeks.